Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
On the old CB360 model Hondas there is a 3-roller clutch. Mine started to slip and sounded like gravel. After researching, I found that there was a removal tool that is essentially a 18mm thread at a 1.5 pitch. These tools can be had for about 8 to 17 dollars plus shipping.

I found a better way. After looking all over for bolts,I found that some Home Depots have them. In any case,I had one shipped free to my local store for a total cost of about 3.50. using an oil filter wrench to steady the rotor, my wrench and the bolt substitute tool popped it off very easily. Score!

Once the beastie was removed, the three mounting screws on the back that fastens the clutch housing to the rotor had backed out and one had been Helicoiled. While it is open,I will install a new roller kit.

My question is which type of Locktite would you use to keep the clutch mounting bolts from backing out or any other advice that you can offer
 

·
Save them all!
Joined
·
4,278 Posts
Clean, dry, and oil free threads, red lock-tite, and then torque to spec.

That's what I would do anyway..
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,647 Posts
My question is which type of Locktite would you use to keep the clutch mounting bolts from backing out or any other advice that you can offer
The original procedure was to use a punch to lock the screw heads, by striking in two places around the edge, locking them in place. Just so you know.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Thanks for the info. The screw that is Helicoiled was hitting the rear and is worn to a knife edge.

So , Wintersol, I assume the divots in the housing is where you strike the screws to lock them in?

Also,I will measure the diameter of the rollers to see how much wear the OEM rollers have. I might have jumped the gun when I ordered that kit.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,647 Posts
On my 450, when a screw backed out, the plate that keeps the rollers properly aligned didn't, and one of the rollers was able to turn sideways, making noise and keeping the clutch from working. The whole thing had to be replaced, due to the damage; luckily, a dealer nearby had the kit on hand. I used LocTite on mine, rather than a punch; pretty sure it was blue, because of the size of the screws. Red would have required time in an oven, if ever they need to come back out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks,it will be Blue then. I did notice remnants of punch marks and they did line up with the divots..........

This is just another thing that the service manual is really thin on information, so people who have been there and done that are a big help in keeping these old beasties going.

On another note, I got a complete engine case gasket kit from Gasket King. for less than 25 bucks and free shipping. They make their own stuff and super fast shipping.If you have something they can scan, they can make a custom gasket even if it is not in their inventory.

Once this bike is running again,I am sure that it will run better than it ever has for me due to very corroded wiring connections that I found by doing voltage drop...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,160 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Together again and tips for re-assembly

1. I used blue locktite AND staked the screw heads. The one screw was not really all that great and the others had worked the threads pretty hard by being loose.
2. Before doing this job, buy the little springs part# 28125-255-020 The springs hold the roller against the clutch. My springs had worn to different lengths and all were shorter than the new replacements.

3. It is probably not necessary to replace the spring caps or the rollers. I measured a new replacement and the old rollers and they all measured .0400. So if you are doing this job, it might pay to do the teardown with the new springs on hand, and it might be done in an evening.

4. The springs, caps, and rollers can be inserted without removing the clutch housing from the stator. I fiddled with mine and used tape to temporarily hold the rollers, but one fell out anyway. It stays clean inside, so why risk screws backing out if they are staying tight at present? It is a good job to do at the bench with a fluffy towel underneath to avoid losing any parts. Mrs Slum does not know that I did it at the kitchen table.;)

5. Take the time to remove the starter gear from behind the assembly [ crankshaft] Once the gear is added to the clutch assembly the rollers can be captured and will not fall out unseen and ruin your day. It is very easy to remove the little clip that holds the gear in place and actually makes assembly very easy.

6. Of course you all realize that the keyway must line up with the rotor-- just make sure that you do not lose the key
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Question On Fork Bearings

I have a Honda Shadow VT600 and had the unnerving experience of having the handle bars lock as I made a city corner. It had happened before at very low speeds, pulling into a gas station and hitting speed bump at 5 mph.
This last time I was in the city and had just gone through some rough road and made a turn and found the handle bars were stuck in the position I needed for the 90 degree turn.

I have tried to get them to stick while at rest without any success. I am guessing it is the bearings in the triple tree. Admittedly the forkshocks are shot and that has probably something to do with this issue.

Has anyone heard of such a thing?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,647 Posts
It certainly sounds like a damaged head bearing, with a serious flat spot. If you can, lift the front wheel and turn the bars from side to side; it should move smoothly, with no sensation of roughness. An alternative is damage to the fork lock, and it is catching when you turn the bars to near the lock position,
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top