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Discussion Starter #1
Question here. I have a bottle of Sta-bil fuel storage treatment that I've had fornprobably a little over 2 years. Issue is I've kept it in the garage the whole time-been through warm summers and very cold winters (several days of negative temps ). Is this still good to use? I was going to add some to my tank here pretty soon as the Ohio temps are taking a steep dive into the 30s in the next couple of days.
 

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Veteran Member
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Eye gave you the perfect answer. From Sta-Bil's website:

WHAT IS THE SHELF LIFE OF STA-BIL® FUEL STABILIZER?

The shelf life of all STA-BIL® brand products is 2 years after the bottle has been opened, provided it has been tightly capped and stored in a cool, dry place. If the product has not yet been opened, you should use the color of the fluid as an indicator. If the product is still bright red, it is fine to use. If the product has turned to a very dark red (or brown) color, we recommend purchasing a new bottle. It will not harm anything if you use an old bottle of STA-BIL® brand, it just may not be as effective.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
More so than the age of the bottle, I'm concerned that it was stored in varying temperature extremes in the garage. Outside temps were anywhere from probably 90F down to -18F.
 

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The 43rd Poser
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I lived in Northern Michigan for years...

Used that crap once, and had a boat engine not want to start in the spring. I'll never use it again.

Bikes and most boats (except my duck hunting boats) were stowed for 5-6 months every year, and down around 20 below maybe once or twice, -15 pretty regular for a couple weeks, below zero for likely a month, and snow on the ground usually from late October through mid-April.


Merely my experience, and a lot of people love it....

 

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American Legion Rider
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Although I use Pri-G it's basically the same stuff. I wonder just how old the stuff was that you used Safetyman. I've had motors just sitting for 5+ years and they fire right up.

In the OP's case I think it's probably okay to use but I honestly wouldn't expect to get the protection one would expect. Like maybe exactly what happened to you.

If I was going to store my bike I wouldn't use the OP's stuff to be honest. The 2 years and extreme temp swings have affected it. A new bottle isn't that much and might save on headaches later. The stuff is just too questionable.
 

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I suggest you pour some fresh Sta-bil in the old Sta-bil and that should do it:biggrin:

Sam;)
 

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American Legion Rider
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I suggest you pour some fresh Sta-bil in the old Sta-bil and that should do it:biggrin:

Sam;)
Nah, it's Pri-G that makes the claim it can freshen stale fuel. I don't think Sta-Bil makes that claim. One I find impossible to believe either way. So put some Pri-G in there to freshen the Sta-Bil.:coffeescreen:
 

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I lived in Northern Michigan for years...

Used that crap once, and had a boat engine not want to start in the spring. I'll never use it again.
I think given its proven track record, you likely had something else going on, or the treatment did not reach all of the fuel pockets for whatever reason.
 

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I used Sta-Bil before they realized most pump fuel contains ethanol, and my bike ran poorly, until I topped of with fresh fuel enough times to thin out the Sta-Bil. That's when I started using Seafoam. I've since noticed that the Sta-Bil now says it is formulated for E10, but I haven't tried it.

If the OP has the E10 formula, and it hasn't turned color too much, use it - otherwise, it won't hurt your car or truck in small amounts.
 

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Troublemaker
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But Seafoam will if you leave it in too long on a carbed engine. It is a solvent and will eat up rubber after a while. It is great for short time use and running through the system to clean it out.
 

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2007 Yamaha Road Star Silverado 1700
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But Seafoam will if you leave it in too long on a carbed engine. It is a solvent and will eat up rubber after a while. It is great for short time use and running through the system to clean it out.
Technically gasoline is a solvent as well. ;)

In the concentrations they recommend using for stabilizing fuel I doubt you'll notice any issues. Of course, if you dump a bottle or two in your 3 gallon tank and leave it over winter, you might have some issues. ;)
 

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Troublemaker
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True, but who uses the recommended amount of Seafoam? I use a lot more when I use it, but I also burn it out right away. It is said that it will work as a stabilizer too, but I wouldn't myself. It does have good qualities, but mostly for snow blowers as far as I am personally concerned.

The stuff is so great you really have to want to find out what it's made of. They won't list their secret recipe.
 

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Gone.
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I've never had any problems with Sta-bil. A tiller and two generators that get run once a year and no problems with either. I'll use it in a bike too if I think it will be sitting for a couple of months.
 

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Save them all!
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Snake oil IMO.

Shut the fuel off, run the carbs dry, keep it covered. It will start fine after the Winter.

Completely unnecessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I got a new bottle today and treated the full tank. Probably won't get to ride again for sometime. Temps dropped and look like they'll be that way for awhile.
 

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But Seafoam will if you leave it in too long on a carbed engine. It is a solvent and will eat up rubber after a while. It is great for short time use and running through the system to clean it out.
I guess that depends on how old the rubber parts are; newer parts are just fine with Seafoam, Lucas, Techron, etc., because of what they are made from, but older ones, like NOS from the '70s, will degrade. Ethanol does that to them, too, BTW.

The chemicals are all forms of alcohol, with naptha, which don't separate out when 'wet', the way ethanol does, so help keep the ethanol mixed with the real gasoline. GM recommends periodic use of a fuel system cleaner (Techron preferred, of course) for vehicles with in-tank fuel pumps, to keep the screens from clogging and making the pumps overheat.
 
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