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SOS: Need help with a disappointing product(Rust Converter)!

240 Views 8 Replies 7 Participants Last post by  Offcenter
Dear forum members,
I recently purchased a product Rust Converter that promised incredible results, but unfortunately, it has turned out to be completely ineffective. I am disappointed and a bit lost as to what to do next. I invested time and money into this product, and I am frustrated with the disappointing outcomes. I would like to seek your help and valuable advice. If you have experienced a similar situation, could you please share your experiences and provide guidance on the best course of action?
Perhaps you have tips on obtaining a refund or contacting customer service?
I sincerely thank you in advance for your support.
Your insights and recommendations will be greatly appreciated.
Best regards,
Martis
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I have been using Aquarius Bluesteel rust converting primer, for rusted metal surfaces. Stops rust.
That is what is written on the label. The metal surface has to be rusty, all over rust. It works great.
It does not work on spots of rust. It does not stick to non rusty surfaces.
For metal that is rusty all over, it works. Then I use red oxide, or a finishing coat. Some of the metal bits I just use the rust paint. I can take pics if you like. I am doing the work on my 77 Dodge van, that had been sitting in a field for a long time.
Go to that site and write an appropriate review .

I'm not familiar with what is available in Spain , but , I would think a decent hardware store would be able to sell you something that should work .
I have used a product called Evapo rust works every time.
Yep, if you bought it with your credit card, call your CC company and explain to them what happened and get them to refund you if you don't get a positive response from the seller. I have done it a few times and got refunded. I have also threatened sellers with calling my CC company and they changed their mind and refunded my purchase. They know that CC companies want to keep their clients happy.
With respect to a credit card purchase.
I got some charges to my card that were not authorized by me. The card company did an excellent job of nailing the baddies, crediting my account, and I even got to keep a cheap product that I had actually ordered, for no charge.
When talking with the card company, I asked them if my credit history, paying my bill on time, and the time I had held the card, were all shown to them at their end. It was.
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Most of the brand rust converter are just expensive versions with a fancy label avalable in consumer quantities. It鈥檚 pretty much the same stuff in all of them.
Phosphoric acid.
Which is sold for industry use.

Steel rust as soon as it is exposed to oxygen. Particularly if water is present. Modern primer coatings are applied as soon as bare steel is exposed. often with inert gas and heat. To prevent oxidation starting.

If the coating is damaged oxidation will start. And progress quickly. Pitting occurs where coating breaks down.
oxidzation starts as soon as steel is exposed to air. If paint is applied after oxidation has started, it will not adhere properly and oxidation will reoccur. No

The problem with regular steel, when it oxidizes. The oxide is powdery porous and air gets through so oxidation continues.
The phosphoric acid changes the rust or steel oxide to a hard non porus oxide this change is the best a DIY can probably achieve it will eventually fail.

When the coating fails. The oxidation extends out under the coating. You may notice this as a bubbling effect on Old rusty car.

clean of the rust from damaged area, with wire brush or disk until appears to be bare metal and from about 1/2 in of surrounding area, paint with phosphoric acid. Let dry paint with primer. Repeat primer 4 or 5 coats then up to you if you want to fill and sand. Before top coats.
outside a proper body shop this is as good as it gets.

Don鈥檛 remove any more undamaged coat than you have to.
it will fail again eventually.
Im not a body shop guy.
I did Marine.

I bought a cheep old bike years ago when it was all I could afford. It had been neglected and was quite rusty.
Took it to pieces.
Did as I said above, did鈥檛 bother with filling and sanding. I also oiled or greased every moving part nut and bolt.
Never occurred to me the electrical system is grounded back through the frame.馃榾
Sloved my rusty bike problem.
Never got the lights and indicators working properly again. 馃榾
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With respect to a credit card purchase.
I got some charges to my card that were not authorized by me. The card company did an excellent job of nailing the baddies, crediting my account, and I even got to keep a cheap product that I had actually ordered, for no charge.
When talking with the card company, I asked them if my credit history, paying my bill on time, and the time I had held the card, were all shown to them at their end. It was.
I just found out about the CC card and my credit score. I use one of my CC cards for most of my monthly purchases. I use it so much that I often get to over 1/2 of my credit limit on the card for once month. Then I was paying the charges off at the end of the month. Speaking to a lender, he told me that the credit reporters, check CC balances once a month and if your balance is over 50% of your credit limit, it will negatively affect your credit score. He said this is true even if you pay off the total amount every month. So, this is something to keep in mind if this may apply to you.
Most of the brand rust converter are just expensive versions with a fancy label avalable in consumer quantities. It鈥檚 pretty much the same stuff in all of them.
Phosphoric acid.
Which is sold for industry use.
You beat me to it. I was going to say the same thing.
You can buy a whole gallon of phosphoric acid from Amazon, cheap.
Just dilute with water then spray or brush over all the rust.
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