Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 56 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,070 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So, there I was riding along, minding my own business when this dude decides to tailgate me for 2, 3 miles to the freeway. As he makes his over the white line nutball pass to merge across the bow of the car I was sliding in front of I think, what a jerk and suddenly as he goes by it turns out my left hand is thinking and communicating the same thing.

Oops.

This gentleman takes offense. Slows to about 35 and plants himself on the dotted line blocking both right hand lanes. I slow and backpedal. He is clearly conflicted on what to do. I’m not going to pass him and he’s not willing to go slower. Think about it. He’s a tailgater. He’s probably tailgating and banzaiing lane because he’s late and in a hurry. (Perhaps to church?) We travel down the road a couple of miles before he settles into the right lane going 45. I’m hanging back a good 100 yards. He starts to pull off on an uphill exit and I make a serious mistake–I don’t realize he’s getting off so he can get back on behind me. I should have pulled over at the bottom of the ramp and waited to see what he was going to do and then decided on my course of action.

Oops.

By the time I’m on the other side of the overpass I realize what’s going on and start to really hustle to get to the next exit which is the only one for 4 miles. I watch the mirrors as this guy tries to muscle around another car coming down the ramp but is blocked. It’s very interesting to watch but I need distance. I get on the ponies. Coming up I bail out on the next off ramp because I have to safe harbors I can get to fairly quickly: the State Police Barracks and the local Harley-Davidson dealership. I figure either provide me some kind of back up. As I’m going up the off ramp I can see the light is green and the two left turn lanes are empty and the right hand turn lane is clear as well. Dude is catching up fast and the light is very, very, stale. Taking a page from my 18 year old truck driving days. I slide to the left, and start banging away on my horn as the light goes yellow and stays yellow a very long time. The time for watching the light is over and still banging on the horn I scratch a hard left across the front of three lanes of traffic.

Oops.

Looking in my mirrors I see a flash of white as this muttonhead shoots straight across through the intersection and back down the ramp to rejoin the freeway. I don’t see the entire car just doors and door handles, I believe he was trying to hit me. I placed him in a position where to truly get me he would have to wreck himself and self-preservation took over. Barely. I haven’t been involved with a road rage incident in a long, long time and I’m still surprised by how technical the entire event was. I wasn’t scared-my heart was beating faster-but I was thinking and when I made the first really big tactical error (letting him get behind me) I recognized it immediately. Thinking about it now I realize that flipping this fool off wasn’t the first mistake–not pulling over and letting he around me before I got to the freeway was.

If you’re in the Boise Idaho area and see a POS mid 00s white Chevy Malibu filling up your mirrors–find an excuse to make that right turn and let him go by.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,728 Posts
So, there I was riding along, minding my own business when this dude decides to tailgate me for 2, 3 miles to the freeway. As he makes his over the white line nutball pass to merge across the bow of the car I was sliding in front of I think, what a jerk and suddenly as he goes by it turns out my left hand is thinking and communicating the same thing.

Oops.

This gentleman takes offense. Slows to about 35 and plants himself on the dotted line blocking both right hand lanes. I slow and backpedal. He is clearly conflicted on what to do. I’m not going to pass him and he’s not willing to go slower. Think about it. He’s a tailgater. He’s probably tailgating and banzaiing lane because he’s late and in a hurry. (Perhaps to church?) We travel down the road a couple of miles before he settles into the right lane going 45. I’m hanging back a good 100 yards. He starts to pull off on an uphill exit and I make a serious mistake–I don’t realize he’s getting off so he can get back on behind me. I should have pulled over at the bottom of the ramp and waited to see what he was going to do and then decided on my course of action.

Oops.

By the time I’m on the other side of the overpass I realize what’s going on and start to really hustle to get to the next exit which is the only one for 4 miles. I watch the mirrors as this guy tries to muscle around another car coming down the ramp but is blocked. It’s very interesting to watch but I need distance. I get on the ponies. Coming up I bail out on the next off ramp because I have to safe harbors I can get to fairly quickly: the State Police Barracks and the local Harley-Davidson dealership. I figure either provide me some kind of back up. As I’m going up the off ramp I can see the light is green and the two left turn lanes are empty and the right hand turn lane is clear as well. Dude is catching up fast and the light is very, very, stale. Taking a page from my 18 year old truck driving days. I slide to the left, and start banging away on my horn as the light goes yellow and stays yellow a very long time. The time for watching the light is over and still banging on the horn I scratch a hard left across the front of three lanes of traffic.

Oops.

Looking in my mirrors I see a flash of white as this muttonhead shoots straight across through the intersection and back down the ramp to rejoin the freeway. I don’t see the entire car just doors and door handles, I believe he was trying to hit me. I placed him in a position where to truly get me he would have to wreck himself and self-preservation took over. Barely. I haven’t been involved with a road rage incident in a long, long time and I’m still surprised by how technical the entire event was. I wasn’t scared-my heart was beating faster-but I was thinking and when I made the first really big tactical error (letting him get behind me) I recognized it immediately. Thinking about it now I realize that flipping this fool off wasn’t the first mistake–not pulling over and letting he around me before I got to the freeway was.

If you’re in the Boise Idaho area and see a POS mid 00s white Chevy Malibu filling up your mirrors–find an excuse to make that right turn and let him go by.
Well written, we have more than our fair share of tailgaters here in Jersey.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,010 Posts
I agree with you ... flipping people off is usually not a good idea. esp. if they are behaving somewhat like jerks. it can escalate quickly - which it did in your case. so the old rule of the road still applies ... "give respect, show respect".

once things went downhill ... your choice was either to get as much distance between him and you as possible (which you did ... more or less). or stick it to him. that's pretty much the two choices.

if you're gonna escape. you need to lay on the juice big time, and not be afraid to hit big numbers on your speedometer. I did like your strategy of catching the yellow light late ... but as you discovered, when somebody is mad as h*ll, that isn't always gonna stop them.

some hard braking and U-turns on major streets ... is not a bad plan.
lane splitting comes in real handy for this kinda situation .. even though everybody puts it down.

OR pull your bike over behind something really solid, stop, and be ready for a face-to-face encounter.

Ohhh and BTW ... this encounter you described wouldda' gone down real fast if that white car had followed ME. I have a low tolerance for tailgaters. That's a dangerous action to pull on a bike, and I think of it as being equivalent to attempted vehicular homicide. So I always WAVE those people off in a proactive way - I DONT flip them off - but I leave them with no doubt that they will deal with the friggin' Sons Of Anarchy and Mayhem - if they don't leave more room behind my bike. So far, nobody has pushed it ... when I have waved them off. You need to be convincing :)

dT
 

·
Aging & Worn
Joined
·
4,516 Posts
I had a guy on my tail Friday..........TIGHT on my tail. It was only a two-lane (coming and going) road, so it's not like he had a ton of lanes to choose from.

But.........I was going the speed that is common on that road, and yet he still stayed tucked in tight.

I didn't flip him off or make faces or gestures at him, and eventually he got an opportunity to get by, and took it.

Just wondered inside myself, .........."no matter how much hurry he's in, or for whatever reason; doesn't he realize the danger he puts me in, by hanging on my tail like that?"

-Soupy
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
20,002 Posts
I learned on my first bike(only a 185cc) to just pull to the side of the road and either let them by or have it out with them. A 185cc bike isn't going to outrun anything! And a car is just no match to a bike. It always amazed me how some people get scared if a biker pulls up next to them when they in the car can do so much more harm to the biker. Even if he's a real bad boy with get back whip. There is just no challenge there. And don't even think of gestures in Texas. They think nothing about pulling a gun out. That's another area I think should have a mental exam to get a carry permit. We literally have crazy people carrying guns here! So in Texas, let these tailgaters by at all cost to your pride. PLEASE!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,010 Posts
CaptCrash

well ... if its an isolated incident - then yeah ... just let it go.

BUT you came pretty close on this one. Imagine what would have happened if that guy had caught your bike with is car chase. Not worth thinking about. My guess is that you will think long and hard about this incident. Let us know what you come up with.

dT
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
336 Posts
Yeah some people should not be on the highway,some think since they are bigger with their cage that they have ALL the right of way.And there are some who are narrow minded and don't understand our way of life and think we shouldn't be out there,better to just let it go and pray for the next poor biker that &@$!hole gets behind.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,070 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
CaptCrash

well ... if its an isolated incident - then yeah ... just let it go.

BUT you came pretty close on this one. Imagine what would have happened if that guy had caught your bike with is car chase. Not worth thinking about. My guess is that you will think long and hard about this incident. Let us know what you come up with.

dT
1. Don't create threat.
2. If at all possible keep it in front of you.
3. If it's behind you create seperation.
4. Flee. They may be breaking the law but what fun is it when you're strapped to a board and you shake your fist because "it's his fault".

There's a chapter in "The Elemental Motorcyclist" dedicated to this very subject that details evasion strategies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,010 Posts
Cap Crash ... I'll check out the evasion strategies thing. I have never seen that written down anywhere - specifically for motorcycles. The trick with evasion - besides actually succeeding - is to keep a cool had and NOT get into an accident. If high speeds cause the MC rider to wreck, then the evasion is still a total loss.

Unfortunately - the jerk in the white car is still out there in ID. Which means that some other MC rider will wind up being in his crosshairs in the future ... sooner or later.

cheers,
dT
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,070 Posts
Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Unfortunately - the jerk in the white car is still out there in ID. Which means that some other MC rider will wind up being in his crosshairs in the future ... sooner or later.

cheers,
dT
Or he went home and Ray Rice'd his wife. Either way at some point his actions are on him. My pop always preached "you can't control how others act, only how you react."

Me? Shouldn't have. Him? Shouldn't have. It's over, respawn, roll on.

The basics:

Every so often I see threads that mention Road Rage and document instances of drivers acting with malice toward bikers. With that in mind I thought I'd take a moment to share some basic security tips that people in TV use to keep Anchors, Reporters, Photographers and other personnel safe. I'm going to apply them to motorcycles and show you some of the risks and rewards of being aware of your surroundings and having an escape plan.

1. Avoid having a predictable pattern. Have at least 3 different routes between your work and home. Alternate routes randomly. If someone is mad at you and knows you'll be on your bike at a specific time in a specific place--you're at risk. If you have an incident on the way to work or home alter your route for the next few days, this gives the other driver time to cool off and forget you. If a driver feels you cut them off at an intersection, feels slighted enough to honk or flip you off, and then sees you the next day? You can become a target of opportunity. It's best to avoid them for a day or two so use an alternate route. Varying your time of departure and arrival can help you avoid the scene of an "incident".

2. If you think you're being followed--"Walk the Box". Make four consecutive right hand turns. Go around the block. It may be a BIG block but there is NO REASON ON EARTH for someone to make 4 rights turns behind you unless they are following you. If they do, then they are following you. You are now a potential target. Behave accordingly (see #3).

3. Once you fear (or know) you're being followed, proceed to a well lit, well populated area. This sounds awful, but place yourself where there are witnesses. Witnesses will help confirm your account of what happens and often serve as good samaritans. Knowing where the local police station, substation or barracks are located is a good thing too. Go the police station parking lot and pull right up to the door. If you're being followed--they'll peel off. IF they follow you into the parking lot, just park it by the door and lay on the horn. Officers will respond. (Come on, there's a bike up on the sidewalk by the front door laying on the horn! They'll come out.) Police Stations tend to be populated 24/7 but be aware that at 2 in the morning in small municipalities you might not have an officer on duty at the station.

4. Keep a log of vehicles you are having trouble with. IF every few days that orange Mazda is giving you the finger? Take note of the model, year, and plate number. Once you're at work or home write up a discription of the driver and a short note of what they're doing. This may sound nuts but you'll have documentation if something happens. (AND you'll realize that you need to vary your route to avoid problems).

You don't need to be a target. IF you're having a problem the best way to behave is classic motorcycle safety--don't place yourself in a bad position. AVOID places where you're having problems!

A couple of final thoughts; first, cars are big! They weight a couple of tons. As a weapon they are profoundly dangerous to motorcyclists and you want to avoid confrontations with them. What's the old saying? "Don't bring a knife to a gunfight"? A car's strength as a weapon are size, weight and low risk of operator injury. A driver running over a rider is at very little risk. YOU, the rider, are extremely vulnerable. Use your head to stay out of bad situations. Don't escalate them. FLEE. You can split lanes, ride up on the sidewalk, out brake, out turn and out acclerate most automobiles. Use this to your advantage. If you need to flee, turn into that parking lot, double back, slip between stopped cars, evade--don't fight.

Yeah, fleeing isn't as glamous as fighting but you can't beat up an SUV with your gloved fists and if a driver decides to park it on you? Even if it's a crime--you're still the one doing the hospital time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,122 Posts
I wonder how a LEO would react when pulling you over for speeding if you said, "I'm speeding to get away from that tailgating maniac in the white pickup who was behind me and who I thought was trying to run me off the road. I couldn't stop and let him passed because then I would just have been a stationary target."
 

·
Aging & Worn
Joined
·
4,516 Posts
Anyone in a car or truck DOES have all the right of way. :biggrin:

Huh?! What Law book YOU readin from??????

I grant you, that in a traffic situation, a car or truck will win in a crash competition between either of them and a motorcycle. I get THAT.

But let's not imply that the motorcycle is not entitled to the same lane as they, or the same access as they. (I don't think SCOOTERS should have the same rights......but that's just "me." lol)


-Soupy
 
1 - 20 of 56 Posts
Top