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Discussion Starter #1
OK, so I'm sure some of this stuff has been asked/answered a lot, so I'm sorry if I'm repeating things here, but I've really done a lot of reading up on this stuff. The more I read, the more I read conflicting information sometimes, or information specific to enamels, or specific to lacquer, or specific to something else. And I'm a little confused.

Anyways, to take a step back, I have a 2003 Honda Shadow ACE and I'm going to be re-painting my tank (which is in quite good condition, the paint too) and have two new fenders I bought that are already primed with powder coating (just the fenders are, no primer on tank yet).


The aerosol paint materials I have at my disposal now are a can of 2k Eastwood Epoxy Primer (black), some cans of Omni-Pak Lacquer (black color for my base), and a couple cans of 2K Spraymax High Gloss Clear Coat.

So to start with my questions...

The autobody place where I bought some paint said my gas tank had a pretty solid base coat and I didn't need to strip the paint down completely, just to the base and then paint over top. I've gone and sanded a bit far in spots maybe, I don't know. I still have work to do, but in some areas I can see metal (as a newbie I can't post pics yet or I would), although most places it's just paint. Did I go too far? Or should I strip the whole tank down? I hear people talk about how important prep work is, so I don't want to screw this up.


Secondly, I'm wondering about re-applications / flash time / drying... After I apply my primer coats (with whatever proper flash time between) can I then just wait the flash time and jump right into the base color (the lacquer), or should I be letting this stuff dry up for a while and then sand to rough it up, and then apply the base?

Same question after lacquering.. do I need to let it dry completely before applying the clear coat, or is this again a case of waiting for whatever flash time, then jump right into clear coat?


Again, sorry if this has been answered a lot.. I'm really anxious to do this, but at the same time have been reading all sorts of different ways of doing things that has just led to more questions. More questions likely to come after these answers, and thanks for your time!
 

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If it had a good base coat then all you needed to do was to roughen up the surface with some light sanding. This would give the new paint a place to stick.

If you are down to metal then you have gone too far and will need to primer those spots. Then sand that down and feather the edges.

Are you wet or dry sanding?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I think that my initial problem was that the autobody place suggested to start with a 220 (iirc), and then work my way up to 600. I only did the 220, and I did it dry, and it was just stuff from the hardware store (I've since bought better quality sand paper). Since then, I haven't done any more to it yet.

Should I have wet sanded instead and/or started with a higher grit?

Also, at this point would it be worth my while to prime the whole thing (over top of what is there, the bare stuff, and the painted/sanded part)? I have a whole can of 2K epoxy primer with no other use for it, and from what I understand, once activated I only have 48 hours to use it anyways. Or is it wiser just to touch up (with the primer) the spots that I went down to metal with and then feather, as you said? It's only a pretty small area where I went too far, but like I said, I basically have no other use for this whole can.

Thanks for your help!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Oh one more thing, if it matters with my primer question (whether I should prime the whole thing), my bike's former color was red and some black, and new paint is black.
 

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After you get all your problems fixed, primer the entire tank before you paint it. you will find it really hard to get a good paint job without a full primer coating to start with. Small areas, you can feather in with spot priming, but use a good thick coat, and uniformly snad the entire surface before the base primer. I like to think there was a minumum of 2 primer coats on every thing I paint. I usually don't get there, even with about 3 attempts. I like the red oxide because it hides my crpy painting skills, but I will use anything I can get my hands on. If you want a good prostylefinish, you should care about the base... thats it...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys. So that will help answer the one question (what to do with my bungled sanding job).

I'll tackle that bit hopefully this weekend and get my parts to where they're all primed up and slightly roughed and ready for the basecoat which will probably be a week later ish, at which point I'm sure there will be more questions. One I already asked above.. after I apply my basecoat (the aforementioned Omni-Pak lacquer), should I wait for that to fully dry before going on to clear coat, or do I just wait whatever flash time after the last base coat is applied, then do the clear coat?

I understand at some point I'll also need to polish out (possibly wet sand out) orange peel. The order of when this happens confuses me a bit, cause some seemed to do it before clear coating, I think, but seemed like a lot of info out there said apply your 2 (or whatever) coats of clear, THEN polish the orange peel out. Just wondering your recommendations on that.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
So I think I found the answer to my question on another post here in the forum, by markk53 (thank you!)... so here's my plan:

Touch up /w epoxy primer on the spot(s) where I oversanded... wait for that to dry enough for me to sand (looks like 12h, by the specs). I will then sand things uniformly to prepare for the "real" primer coats. I'll then prime the whole tank completely (using bad bike's advice, 2 or 3 coats at least) with flash time between coats. After that's done and dried up, I'll scuff the paint up to prepare for base coat...

Apply my base coat layers (flash time between layers, no sanding). After the last color coat, I will then wet sand with 600 (to remove orange peel). I'll then polish it up to glass like finish. Then lightly scuff it up with a wet sand to prepare for the 2k clear coat, which would be 2 coats, with flash time between.

How's that sound, barring no difficulties? Does it sound like I have the right plan here?
 

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Take your time lay light coats. Start and stop the spray off target. Don't try and paint it all in one sweep
 

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One of the keys to great rattle-can paint jobs is to have both the object being painted AND the cans of paint at 80 degrees or better. Preferably both baking in the sun for an hour or so before spraying. warm works!

Always INITIATE the spraying with the nozzle pointed AWAY from the work piece so the big ugly blobs go into the air and ThEN move the spray pattern towards the piece.

I never found much difference in how LONG I waited between coats, seemed to me that anything over 5 minutes "worked" just about as well as waiting an hour or more.

I've never clear-coated anything, maybe someone here can offer some CC tips.

Of course, turn the can upside down and "clear" the nozzle with pure propellant after each coat.

With proper surface prep and technique a rattle can job can be virtually indistinguishable from a professional job.

CHANGE OF SUBJECT: THREAD DE-RAILER WARNING!

I saw a 2015? Ford Fusion yesterday, yes, a lowly FF, with the most beautiful paint job I have EVER seen on ANY vehicle.

It was black and in direct sun you saw these green sparkles. Absolutely totally beautiful. I would love to have one of MY cars painted with that stuff.

Anyone know what it is, what it's called and how many hundreds of dollars per gallon it costs?

I'll never do it, of course, because my 20-year old cars are all worth far more than the Blue Book valuation the insurance company would give me if someone smashed 'em, and putting $3000 into a paint job would only be that much more I'd lose.

Hmmmm..... maybe the XKE if THAT were to somehow end up in my garage...
 

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Sounds like a pearl job. The pearlizing can just about be any color. A green sparkle wouldn't be too hard to come up with on black.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the tips guys. Starting/stopping off topic is one of those somewhat obvious things, but to have that beaten in my head ahead of time is good, as it's pretty easy to just jump in and do it and forget all the basics. I will take that advice and also not try and do it all in one go!

If anyone can offer any input on CC and orange peel removal process or confirm if what I said above would work, that'd help. Once CC is on, I'm wondering if there will likely be need to do anymore wetsanding/buffing at that point too. Also, wondered about the order of the orange peel removal and clear coating because some advice said spend the time to remove orange peel before CC, some said to do it after.

Thanks again!
 

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IF you prepped it properly and spray even light coats you shouldn't get orange peel or runs.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Oh OK.. I assumed it was just a given I would get orange peel in it unless I was absolutely amazingly good at it. But I will take my time and follow the tips suggested.

Pics later. More bike parts arrived today, so I'm hoping within a couple/few weeks to have my bike all in beautiful bobber form!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
OK, I'm finally about to be able to start this.

On the data sheet for my 2k epoxy primer it says this though:

2-5 minutes flash between coats, depending on temperature.

and also says this:

After 20-30 minutes / 68F (20C) recoatable wet-in-wet.



First, I'm a little difference on "flash" and "recoatable" terminology. Does recoatable just mean if I'm switching to something else I need to wait that time?

Secondly, when it says 2-5 minutes flash, does that mean I want to spray my primer coats within that window? Or is this a minimum time (i.e. do I spray the next coat between 2 and 5 minutes of the last coat, or do I spray it after 5 minutes?).

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Hallelujah! She's done, boys and girls.

I had some troubles along the way, but in the end I think it came out great. Just finished my clear coat tonight.

The one thing that I goofed up along the way was my spray technique, which kind of got me on the color coat. I was spraying across quite quickly and ended up having to apply more coats than I should have. So on what I figured was my final base coat, I messed up by slowing down my sweeping motion too much and getting too close, which led to a run. So I ended up letting that dry, sanded it out and roughed everything up and applied more base coats and then clear tonight.

All said and done, I think it is looking great right now. It's not perfect, but it looks better than what I had before for factory, so I'm happy with that.


Thanks for the advice from everyone. Still have 2 fenders to do, but the tank was really stressing me out even though I could just start over and do it again if I needed to. The fenders I suspect will be a lot easier for me to do.

:71baldboy:
 

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Good job

Some people think that a rattle can paint job is inferior, and mostly it is, but thats due to difficulty in doing a good paint job with a spray can. If you get good paint then its the same paint they make for the sprayers.

Of course robotic painting or dipping would be even better.

I've been doing some painting, I've got it good enough for me, if you inspect the paint job you'll see flaws but if you just stand back and look at it you won't.
 
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