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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As much as vintage Italian motorcycles have sharply increased in value, especially Laverda, Ducati, and others, I've noticed a stagnation and low BB value in many 1980's bikes...notably the Moto Guzzi, and as well, my recent purchase, a Moto Morini. The blue book on these are, IMO, far lower than I would expect or deserved. Some say the '80s bikes have gotten a bad "ugly" reputation. But when you take a good hard look at these bikes, they still say "Italy" all over them. I bought my mint Moto Morini 350 MK2 for almost double what the average blue book retail was. I didn't mind. The bike is gorgeous, as new, and NONE of them were sold in the US...so quite rare. Even the 80's Guzzi LeMans 1000 has a low book value...IMO. Not that I want to ever sell my "prize", but does anyone here see a future pining for these overlooked Italian bikes?

I think the minty ones will grow wings and become quite collectible. What do you say?:confused:
 

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Have patience, Winger. Everything goes up in value eventually. The Moto you have is a #10 bike. All you have to do is sit on it for a few years and you'll make a profit. I can remember back in the 70's and 80's the Guzi's were kind of an 'orphan' bike, in that it took a special kind of rider to like the thing. Are they getting kind of rare? Yes. Will they go up in value? Oh yeah, once people find out they are kind of rare.

Just look at the British bikes as a gauge. BSA 441 Victors', BSA Gold Stars', Royal Enfield (the real ones), some Triumphs, even Nortons could be bought dirt cheap years ago. The prices of these bikes have gone up drastically over the years. And there are lots of them still around, except for the 441 and Royal Interceptor. The value of the 'Pasta' bikes will go up.:wink2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Have patience, Winger. Everything goes up in value eventually. The Moto you have is a #10 bike. All you have to do is sit on it for a few years and you'll make a profit. I can remember back in the 70's and 80's the Guzi's were kind of an 'orphan' bike, in that it took a special kind of rider to like the thing. Are they getting kind of rare? Yes. Will they go up in value? Oh yeah, once people find out they are kind of rare.

Just look at the British bikes as a gauge. BSA 441 Victors', BSA Gold Stars', Royal Enfield (the real ones), some Triumphs, even Nortons could be bought dirt cheap years ago. The prices of these bikes have gone up drastically over the years. And there are lots of them still around, except for the 441 and Royal Interceptor. The value of the 'Pasta' bikes will go up.:wink2:
Ketchboy, I'm pretty much an ALL vintage bike enthusiast. The manufacturers had their own style and grace, as well as specific workmanship, which clearly identified who they were. Many were hand-built. But dayam, now look at, for example, the dirt bikes of today...especially the Japanese big three. You recognize the bike's make by its color before anything else. (Yawn).

To me, the older Brit and "pasta" bikes created some SERIOUS art. The art may have not been as refined as the Japanese bikes, but that's not everything. Nope, don't care if my pasta bike stagnates (I think it won't), because it shouts "look at me". That's all I want for now. BTW...I'm looking at a 1987 Guzzi 1000 MK IV LeMans SE with 5K miles. Very sweet! They sold around 100 of them in the US. Prolly won't be able to afford it though. :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Have patience, Winger. Everything goes up in value eventually. The Moto you have is a #10 bike. All you have to do is sit on it for a few years and you'll make a profit. I can remember back in the 70's and 80's the Guzi's were kind of an 'orphan' bike, in that it took a special kind of rider to like the thing. Are they getting kind of rare? Yes. Will they go up in value? Oh yeah, once people find out they are kind of rare.

Just look at the British bikes as a gauge. BSA 441 Victors', BSA Gold Stars', Royal Enfield (the real ones), some Triumphs, even Nortons could be bought dirt cheap years ago. The prices of these bikes have gone up drastically over the years. And there are lots of them still around, except for the 441 and Royal Interceptor. The value of the 'Pasta' bikes will go up.:wink2:
Ketchboy, I'm pretty much an ALL vintage bike enthusiast. The manufacturers had their own style and grace, as well as specific workmanship, which clearly identified who they were. Many were hand-built. But dayam, now look at, for example, the dirt bikes of today...especially the Japanese big three. You recognize the bike's make by its color before anything else. (Yawn).

To me, the older Brit and "pasta" bikes made for some SERIOUS art. The art may have not been as refined as the Japanese bikes, but that's not everything. Nope, don't care if my pasta bike stagnates (I think it won't), because it shouts "look at me". That's all I want for now. BTW...I'm looking at a 1987 Guzzi 1000 MK IV LeMans SE with 5K miles. Very sweet! They sold around 100 of them in the US. Prolly won't be able to afford it though. :(
 

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Absolutely 100% correct, as far as I'm concerned! The older bikes were a piece of art. A lot of work was put into making the machines back then, as apposed to just 'stamping' them out as they do now. One of the biggest regrets I have was selling my 77 Bultaco 360 Pursang a few years ago. I was getting too old to ride that beast the way it should be ridden, so I used it as part trade for another motorcycle. The point is, when I looked at that bike, my heart sang. It is a beautiful bike. Everything is where it's supposed to be with no useless extras. I look at the new dirt bikes today, and feel.....nothing.

These days I'll look at and tinker with my 66 FLH, and have the same feelings. Yeah, it vibrates, parts fall off if you forgot to use Lok tite, it leaks, but it has 'the look'. I'll not make the mistake of getting rid of that one. My son (who turns 50 next year) has told me he will pass it down to his son when it's time, with instructions never to sell it. Now if I could just convince him that the 76 Vespa Rally 250 scooter is like the Harley. I'm sure the younger bikers with their new shiny, fuel injected, ABS, shaft drive, water cooled, computer controlled bikes feel the same way about their rides. Matter of taste, I guess.

I guess we're the same. It's nice that these old bikes have some value. But for us, we are just 'custodians' of a piece of art.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Absolutely 100% correct, as far as I'm concerned! The older bikes were a piece of art. A lot of work was put into making the machines back then, as apposed to just 'stamping' them out as they do now. One of the biggest regrets I have was selling my 77 Bultaco 360 Pursang a few years ago. I was getting too old to ride that beast the way it should be ridden, so I used it as part trade for another motorcycle. The point is, when I looked at that bike, my heart sang. It is a beautiful bike. Everything is where it's supposed to be with no useless extras. I look at the new dirt bikes today, and feel.....nothing.

These days I'll look at and tinker with my 66 FLH, and have the same feelings. Yeah, it vibrates, parts fall off if you forgot to use Lok tite, it leaks, but it has 'the look'. I'll not make the mistake of getting rid of that one. My son (who turns 50 next year) has told me he will pass it down to his son when it's time, with instructions never to sell it. Now if I could just convince him that the 76 Vespa Rally 250 scooter is like the Harley. I'm sure the younger bikers with their new shiny, fuel injected, ABS, shaft drive, water cooled, computer controlled bikes feel the same way about their rides. Matter of taste, I guess.

I guess we're the same. It's nice that these old bikes have some value. But for us, we are just 'custodians' of a piece of art.
I loved the Bultaco! I pined for one when I first began flat track racing, but couldn't afford one. Settled on a new Kawasaki 250 F81M. Then the bike that REALLY got my juices flowing was at a motocross...the old Coffin Tank Maico! The top end of the brute was simply menacing looking. And turns out, that bike was as bad-ass as it looked. Your Bultaco was hand-produced, was it not? Maybe even that Maico?
 

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I've noticed a stagnation and low BB value in many 1980's bikes...notably the Moto Guzzi, and as well, my recent purchase, a Moto Morini.

Hmm.. well I guess give it a couple weeks and if there are no changes use it for burnouts and stunt shows.

Or leave it by the side of the road and I'll remove it for you. (It's a free service..)

:grin:
 
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Actually it was! I had a 250 Pursang and needed parts. I told the OL I had to go get some parts, so I could race the next day. The 'part' I came back with was the 360.:grin: The 360 was a factory racer. I don't know the riders name, but at the end of the season, Bultaco gave him the bike. He didn't want it, so put it in the show room on consignment. I bought it, are you ready for this, for 750 dollars! When I got home, the wife looked at me, looked at the bike, shook her head, and handed me a beer. 45 years later I'm still with her!

Like you, I've ridden all kinds of dirt bikes from Zundapps, Greeves, Huskys, Montessa, to Maico. Zundapp and Greeves you had to manhandle. The husky was like a tractor, point it and go. Montessa was a really nice and delicate machine, and I had no complaints. The Maico? My boss had one that I rode once. Got that? ONCE! Lordy that thing was a Beast! Made my Bull seem like a play toy. LOL. Sure do miss it.:crying:
 
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