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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone, hope you can help.
I've installed LED indicators on the front of my 2002 CBR600. I still have bulbs on the back.
I understand the need for resistors to trick the bike into thinking a bulb isn't out.
After fitting resistors to the LEDs on the front, they're still hyperflashing. My question is, do i need to fit all 4, even to the bulbs at the back or should I expect the resistors on the front to have done the job.
Thanks in advance.
Rob

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Ok, what size resistors? And, are you sure they are connected to a proper ground as well as the signal wires?
You can probably do without those resistors by just finding an electronic LED flasher to replace your mechanical one.
 

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To avoid using resistors altogether I use LED flashers ($12 at AutoZone) and/or CANBUS LEDs. These LEDs typically have built in resistors designed to fool computers that check light voltage, but they can be used to stop hyperflashing on old school setups.
 

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My first thought was that maybe the ECU needed updated but this bike is before that time. I'm not at all electrically oriented and WintrSol and Miss M are so listen to them. But I thought that maintaining incandescent on the rear would have created that needed draw. Is there some formula to determine the size resistor needed if a person chooses to go that route versus changing the flasher unit?
 

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My first thought was that maybe the ECU needed updated but this bike is before that time. I'm not at all electrically oriented and WintrSol and Miss M are so listen to them. But I thought that maintaining incandescent on the rear would have created that needed draw. Is there some formula to determine the size resistor needed if a person chooses to go that route versus changing the flasher unit?
The fast flashing is to indicate one bulb out, so you need the load, or equivalent, of two bulbs to flash normally. The equivalent resistance can be found by this formula: R = W/V. A typical bulb is about 21W, so R = 21/12, or 1.75 Ohms. Since that is not a standard value, find the next nearest; 1.8 or 2.2 will do. Of course, it will also use the same power, so you need one that can handle over 21W, or it won't last long. You also don't want it to lean against anything that can melt, like a plastic housing. All-in-all, a LED flasher is a much better choice, as long as you deal with the indicator on the dash board.
 

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Thanks. Hopefully that will help others that run into this in the future. That is, if they take the time to do some research first.
 

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Oops - old man brain. It's a bit more involved than that. My equation above gives the current, not the resistance. So, you get I = W/V, then R = V/I, so the actual value of R should be ~6.8 Ohms, which is a standard value. In a single equation, it would be R = V^2/W, or 144/21. Time for another single malt.
 

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WintrSol said:
Oops - old man brain. It's a bit more involved than that. My equation above gives the current, not the resistance. So, you get I = W/V, then R = V/I, so the actual value of R should be ~6.8 Ohms, which is a standard value. In a single equation, it would be R = V^2/W, or 144/21. Time for another single malt.
Now you're talking!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Guys, thanks so much for all of your input. I shall take all that you've said and move forward on this one accordingly. Thanks again.

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