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I recently bought a 1981 honda cb650 custom for a few hundred bucks with 6300 miles. After picking up a new battery I managed to get it fired up for a second or two using starting fluid (I know im bad). it will run/rev up then die second or two after spraying. Leads me to assume I have a fuel delivery issue most likely the carbs (previous owner said the carbs need to be cleaned). My main problem is finding info about cleaning the pilot jets which are pressed in not removable ones.
1: Can I use a screw extractor like method to pull them out?
2: Can I/Has anyone ever removed the pressed pilot jets then drilled hole slightly larger to add thread repair inserts so you can simply put in the adjustable pilot jets that were added to the 1982 (year later) model?

Any advice helps and is much appreciated!
 

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Trying to remove it with a screw extractor is no doubt going to ruin it. You should be able to clean this with it in place. After disassembly of the carbs, at the very least use carb cleaner and compressed air to clean it out. Your hardest part may be the circuit behind the jet anyway, which would have to be cleaned even if the jet were removed. May need to move on to soaking method, or even ultra sonic cleaning. May need to use a guitar string that will fit in the jet to clean it out.
 

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Due to 10% Ethanol fuel, EVERY engine that has sat for any length of time should be suspected of having fuel delivery issues. I've seen carbs with brown jelly-like goop in them, clogging the passages. Fuel filters, petcocks, injectors, and even fuel lines are all vulnerable.

As bpe suggests, cleaning via partial disassembly to remove soft rubber and plastic parts, then soaking for a moderate period of time in carb cleaning solvent. (I use a dip basket into a metal cannister full of carb cleaner. Been using the same solvent for 25 years, stored in a sealed steel can) Then blow out or poke out the passages. (be gentle with poke-out cleaning) Then re-assemble with seals and plastic parts. This method has always worked for me.

This carb cleaning fix-it is an easy source of income to handy folks. People's garages are constantly being re-populated by engine powered devices that have, over the course of a few months, gone from running to non-running condition.

Any motorhead these days knows the way to keep an engine running is to either keep running it, at least every few weeks and keep fresh gas in the tank, at least every few months, or to store it dry and internally fogged with an oil based aerosol.
 

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Great idea! Buy a bike, work in the garage, avoid people and China's corona virus at the same time. Then when this all blows over, you got a bike to enjoy!

When you get the carb all cleaned up, check the petcock too, and since fuel filters and fuel hose aren't that much, price wise, I'd just replace them.
 

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Carbs are known to be issue due to modern full as previously stated. In face I’ve actually got a carb off a 1980DS 250 that is beyond repair due to it. You should be able to clean the jets in place though once you get it running keep crashing gas in it or store it dry
 
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