Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Aging & Worn
Joined
·
4,516 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So why is it that some people don't like the idea of leaving a battery in the bike when it's in winter storage with the tender attached to it?

I have one of those tenders that isn't running constantly. It only runs when the battery needs to be charged. Otherwise it stays in standby mode.


And my really risking anything by leaving it in the unheated garage in the bike like that?

-soupy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,168 Posts
For winter storage you have a few choices. A tender, not a trickle charger, is a viable option. In a heated garage you could periodically charge a battery to recover its charge and prevent a total discharge, not as good as a tender but it will work. For an unheated garage with no tender you are risking the battery itself. A partly or mostly discharged battery can freeze and destroy the case. I have seen it happen on a battery that I removed because it was no longer any good. By spring there was a split right down one corner. A well charged battery will not freeze down to at least -40 degrees. Again, I once lived in a place where those temperatures did happen and we had lots of freezing issues but the batteries never froze.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,145 Posts
I guess it all depends on where you live.

Here last winter the temps dropped below -30C (-22F) more times than I care to remember. Despite my battery being charged & in pretty good shape, I decided it is safer (& so easy) to remove it from the bike & bring it indoors,, why not do that?

I'm a firm believer that starting/idling the bike periodically throughout the winter does more harm than good , so pulling the battery is no problem.

If you'd rather store the battery in the garage with the bike, then just pull the + cables off the battery to eliminate parasitic voltage loss through the long winter months
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
The possible problem with any tender/charger is the voltage output changing with temperature. If the tender isn't rated for the ambient temperature, the voltage may be too low at cold temperatures to charge the battery or it may rise too high. Usually a slight increase is okay because a cold battery requires a higher voltage to charge. Depending on where you live, many chargers or tenders are not rated for winter temperatures in an unheated space.
 

·
Aging & Worn
Joined
·
4,516 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
The possible problem with any tender/charger is the voltage output changing with temperature. If the tender isn't rated for the ambient temperature, the voltage may be too low at cold temperatures to charge the battery or it may rise too high. Usually a slight increase is okay because a cold battery requires a higher voltage to charge. Depending on where you live, many chargers or tenders are not rated for winter temperatures in an unheated space.
Thank you. That's the discussion I was looking for. The competency of the Battery Tender in an unheated, uninsulated garage, with the battery installed, as is my case.

-Soupy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
My battery tender is a HD but I don't know how it will behave when it gets REALLY cold up here - I will test it in February and let you know :wink:

I remove all of the batteries from my other machinery and bring them indoors for the winter where they stay on a 'smart charger' until spring and that has been working well. I seem to get full battery-life out of the batteries that are treated that way. Some batteries stay in the equipment (like the tractor/snow blower) all year long and it seems if I get 1/2 of the expected battery life, I am doing good. I try to remember to top up the batteries once a month if the machine hasn't been used but I sometimes (often?) forget.

Batteries DO NOT like being cold and not fully charged!

P.S. I have tested some "chargers" at -15C (as in an unheated garage up here) and found the output voltage as low as 10 Volts - not nearly enough to keep a battery up!
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
21,203 Posts
There is a difference chargers. I find a Battery Tender Jr. is only good a maintaining a good battery. The battery I have in my tractor just plain will not stay topped off with a Jr. I had to get a charger/maintainer for it. It's their output that is different. You may need one like that for the cold you get. It's something like one if it has to can pump out 2.75 volts and the other has a max of .75 volts. Don't quote me on those values but you get the idea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,638 Posts
I keep mine in the bike and on a tender all the time. I've never had an issue and my garage isn't heated. Granted, we don't get the extreme sub zero temperatures that some areas get, but it was 7 this morning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,429 Posts
Same here in northern Illinois. My unheated garage never gets really cold, like 20 below or colder. I leave my battery in the bike, on the Battery Tender, because getting the battery out of my bike is a real pain. Plus, should a nice day suddenly come about, I can be ready to go for a ride in about a minute. My bike has a power outlet plug that is "hot", i.e., hooked directly to the battery and thus live all of the time. That is where I plug the Battery Tender in for both winter storage and even during nice weather whenever I will not be riding for more than a few days in a row. The Battery Tender, Stabil in the fuel tank, and rags in the exhaust pipe completes my winter storage process.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
Batteries don't like cold. Ever wonder why the batteries in your car always wait till winter time to decide to kick the bucket? Winter time will always tell you how good your battery is. Don't believe me? Take the battery out of your screw gun (I know you have one) and stick it in the freezer for a few days. See how well the charge stays. I've yet to have a battery die on my during the summer, it always waits till the coldest day of the year.....
 

·
Aging & Worn
Joined
·
4,516 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Even when the temperatures outside get to -10ºF (which they can here), the worst the thermometer reads in the uninsulated and unheated garage is 20ºF. Why that is, I dunno. I suppose it is because the garage is pretty tight, and has a good roof and good siding on it.

-Soupy
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
21,203 Posts
It's stored heat from the earth radiating through the floor.
 

·
Swamp Rat Rider
Joined
·
1,879 Posts
Lot of good replies here just will add had excellent battery life for years on my Bikes using a Deltran Battery Tender Jr. And plug it in whenever I park it in the Garage ..


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Nightfly
Joined
·
4,240 Posts
Batteries don't like cold. Ever wonder why the batteries in your car always wait till winter time to decide to kick the bucket? Winter time will always tell you how good your battery is. Don't believe me? Take the battery out of your screw gun (I know you have one) and stick it in the freezer for a few days. See how well the charge stays. I've yet to have a battery die on my during the summer, it always waits till the coldest day of the year.....
Disagree... While batteries don't love the cold, they don't like the heat either. I've had a few die when the temps got real hot. So from my personal experience it goes both ways.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,478 Posts
If you'd rather store the battery in the garage with the bike, then just pull the + cables off the battery to eliminate parasitic voltage loss through the long winter months
It's a lot safer to remove the - battery cable; no risk of arcing your tools to the chassis on that side of a battery, and it makes no difference to the battery.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,644 Posts
Batteries.

There is a book called " Living on 12 Volts " It will tell you more than you ever dreamed possible, about batteries.
The exciting thing about removing the battery from a newer bike: Is setting the clock after you put it back in. Now that I have a bit more time to spare, I am trying to make a habit of checking battery volts, and charging if any are getting down to 12.25
Have 2 batteries in the boat, with solar panels and fancy electronics to keep them charged. 1 in each of three bikes, 1 in the truck, 1 in the tractor, and 1 in the rolling condo that is connected to a full time charger.
1 bike battery is also connected to a small charger in the shed.

Unkle Crusty*
 
C

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
Disagree... While batteries don't love the cold, they don't like the heat either. I've had a few die when the temps got real hot. So from my personal experience it goes both ways.
I disagree with you. I will say, batteries do die either way if it is hot or cold. However, they do tend to fail more often when its cold. Being from Minnesota where the temps can get -30 degrees or more I know how batteries can hold up. I pull all my batteries out of eveything except my ATV which I use for snow removal.
 

·
Nightfly
Joined
·
4,240 Posts
I disagree with you. I will say, batteries do die either way if it is hot or cold. However, they do tend to fail more often when its cold. Being from Minnesota where the temps can get -30 degrees or more I know how batteries can hold up. I pull all my batteries out of eveything except my ATV which I use for snow removal.

What the hell are you disagreeing about? I said heat and cold take their toll and so did you. What is your point? But if you want to argue about it do so. It's been proven that summer is the season for major car battery problems. Heat, not cold shortens battery life.. this according to the Car Care Council. Excessive heat and overcharging are the 2 main reasons for shortened battery life. Heat causes battery fluid to evaporate, thus damaging the internal structure of the battery.

True, there are more road service calls in cold weather for dead batteries that cause starting failure. Cold weather diminishes the battery’s output because of sluggish electro-chemical action that gives the battery its power. Also, colder temperatures increase thickness of the engine oil, making the engine harder to turn over. These factors lead to harder starting, and maybe a dead battery, but not the death of the battery as does hot weather. A dead battery can usually be recharged.
 

·
Aging & Worn
Joined
·
4,516 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
As long as the light on the Deltran Battery Tender Jr. continues to glow "green,"...........I'm a happy camper!!


-Soupy
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top