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Discussion Starter #1
What is the best way to take off slowly, say, from a parking spot inside a parking lot. Without stalling obviously. Is there any trick to it worth knowing? Just curious.
Thanks
 

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American Legion Rider
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23,527 Posts
Clutch control and probably more rpm's than you are giving it if your are stalling. Like maybe you aren't giving any. So it's both clutch AND throttle control.
 

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MODERATOR
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Listen to your engine and always keep your hand on the clutch lever being ready to squeeze it in if the rpm's start to go down. If they go up quickly, still be ready to pull the lever in and to let up on the throttle.

I've had lots of those BIG torque bikes and most all will just pull off at an idle.

My Last Goldwing, a 2012 1800 would actually climb the 20 degree slope into my garage at an idle, and I have no doubt that my current ride, my Triumph Rocket 3 Roadster, with over 50% more torque than the GW (163 ft lbs) would easily do the same.

When I bought my first Goldwing, a new 1997 Aspencade, I kept killing the bike on takeoff because I couldn't hear the engine hardly at all as compared to the Harley Electra Glide I also had that was nice and loud!

Sound and feel does the trick for me.

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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The 43rd Poser
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440 Posts
The friction zone is your friend.

If you haven't taken a BRC, sign up for one soon, they spend a lot of time detailing and teaching the answer to your question.
 

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the advice above is all good.
it really just boils down to knowing the clutch on your particular bike. with a little experience you will be able to move the bike very gently ... you just have to find the friction zone for your motorcycle.

dT
 

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ZAMM Fanatic
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2,730 Posts
The Friction Zone is your Friend!

Here's what I suggest (and do!)

Rev the engine a little to avoid stalling. Let the clutch out JUST to the friction zone, where the bike first starts to move. Then pull the clutch back in, let off the throttle and coast until it's time to do it again.

If you've got a high torque motor, or an idle rpm that's set too high, idling across the parking lot is too fast.

What you DON'T want to do is let the clutch all the way out, and then apply brakes to an engine that's already turning as slow as it can go. That's a recipe for stalling the motor.

So you rev a little to avoid stalling, let the clutch out to where it just starts to engage, get rolling, as you slow down rev and let it out again for another short burst of power, until you get to the highway and can let it out and apply throttle.

Suggest you go practice this in an empty parking lot --- keeping the bike rolling just fast enough that you don't need to put a foot down.

Hope this helps!
 

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It is all about the clutch. I can ride my bike, a 950 pounder, away from a stop with the engine just idling. It takes a bit finer clutch control than I usually bother to do but it can be done. Under normal circumstances I will get the engine speed up a bit, to say 1500 RPM, then use the clutch to control my speed until the clutch is all the way out.
 
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