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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2007 1300 Yamaha Royal Star Tour Deluxe. Last year, on two separate occasions, I felt the clutch slipping. I read on a Venture forum, (same engine and drive train) these bikes have 2 diaphragm springs in the clutch which were not too strong to start with.
More than one of their members solved the problem by installing a Barnett pressure plate. Now I've read where several people have had problems trying to install the Barnett pressure plate. I would just like to pass on what I experienced.
The pressure plate can be installed in several different positions but only one will work. So I placed my new pressure plate on the clutch and turned it several times. I ended up just trying to guess which was the right position. (Note, I've never worked on any motorcycle clutch/pressure plate assembly before).
So I put all the springs in (6) and ran all the bolts in until they bottomed out as per the instructions. Then I was going to torque all the bolts to spec. But the plate kept turning.
I was about to stick a screwdriver into the clutch basket to keep it from turning when it dawned on me. My clutch lever was out. With the screwdriver, I could wiggle all the clutch plates back and forth.
The lever was out, all this should be solid. I pulled all 6 bolts and springs back out and rotated the pressure plate to the next position. I put two springs and bolts in and ran them all the way down. Everything was solid, the bike was in gear, nothing moved. I was able to finish the job and take a short ride today.
Many of you probably know all this already, but I've never done it before and it turns out, it's not that big a job. It took me about 3 hours but that includes a lunch break and putting up my tools afterwards.
My clutch lever is a bit stiffer than it was before, but I had read that was to be expected. Oh, watching the YouTube videos was a great help also. But the one I watched didn't say anything about getting that new, purple pressure plate on in the wrong position. 馃槉
 

Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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I have the same bike, everything I have read is that it happens around 33k, but once you have done the pressure plate change you are good for a long, long time. I haven't changed mine, don't know if it was done before I got it. My clutch is fairly stiff as is.
 

American Legion Rider
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Have you passed the 33K mark yet Critter? Passed 33K and stiff clutch might mean yours has been done for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I read after changing the pressure plate, should be good for another 50,000-60,000 miles, depending on how you ride.
 

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Have you checked your valves yet? Yamaha wants it done like every 12k or something like that. It is expensive if you have to have it done. Once it is done the first time, you should be good for 30k between checks. Do that and the engine should be good for way over 100k
 

Ace Tuner
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I was thinking that bike calls for a 26,000 mile valve lash check. I could be wrong.
The owners manual will give the spec.
 

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I will have to check my manual, you could be correct. I know it isn't cheap to have done.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I didn't get an owners manual when I bought the bike. I have got a repair manual on a computer disc but without a computer, it's not much good. Daughter is supposed to bring me a laptop so I can take a gander at it.

What I hoped to get across with my experience was don't be afraid to try to repair your bike. Read all you can, search for repair videos on Youtube, and, honestly assess your own skills. If it doesn't look that hard, it may not be and all those bucks you would've paid someone else, stays in your pocket!

All the bikes I've owned over the years and this is the first time I've ever had to work clutch/pressure plate itself.
 

Ace Tuner
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I will have to check my manual, you could be correct. I know it isn't cheap to have done.
I was thinking it had shim-under buckets. I looked at the parts diagram showing shim-over buckets that are used for adjusting valve lash.
The interval probably is more like 12K or so using shim overs.
 

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Talk about conflicting information:

From my Clymer Service manual:
600 miles - check valves and adjust as necessary
4000 miles - check valves and adjust as necessary repeat every 4000 miles

From the owner's handbook
Check and adjust every 26,600 miles

I could dig around for my disk with the Yamaha Service manual, but I am not even sure where to start to look for it. Thought I had a copy on my laptop.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
So stretch your oil changes from 3,000-3,500 to 4,000 and adjust/check valves at the same time. 馃榿

Sounds like a good idea. :-[
 

Ace Tuner
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Talk about conflicting information:

From my Clymer Service manual:
600 miles - check valves and adjust as necessary
4000 miles - check valves and adjust as necessary repeat every 4000 miles

From the owner's handbook
Check and adjust every 26,600 miles

I could dig around for my disk with the Yamaha Service manual, but I am not even sure where to start to look for it. Thought I had a copy on my laptop.
You can not trust a Clymer Service manual.
It is not uncommon for Clymer not to know what they're talking about. Ask me how I know.

When Yamaha says it will go 26,000 miles between adjustments... it will.
Most of the time they don't even need adjustment at 26,000. I've checked several.
Back when Yamaha first came out with the 26,000 mile interval I laughed, no bike can go that long. I was wrong, they'll do it!
 

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Found my online service manual and it says 26.6k as well. My indy mech and shop pulled the plug last winter. I need to find a new mechanic, don't want to take it to a dealer. My son-in-law's father, whom I ride with took his Venture to the Yammy Dealer and $1,200 to check and adjust. Ouch.
 

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That's why I got a service contract for my Indian. It covers every darn thing required. Including parts like the drive belt, air filter, ect. It's been worth every penny. Anything goes wrong and they buy it.
 

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Talk about conflicting information:

From my Clymer Service manual:
600 miles - check valves and adjust as necessary
4000 miles - check valves and adjust as necessary repeat every 4000 miles

From the owner's handbook
Check and adjust every 26,600 miles

I could dig around for my disk with the Yamaha Service manual, but I am not even sure where to start to look for it. Thought I had a copy on my laptop.
My bike mechanic says to adjust the valves only if there are signs they need it (hard starting, noise, etc.). He said most of the time when checking the adjustment he doesnt do enough to matter. 33,000 miles so far without a problem, although that isnt much I admit.
 

Ace Tuner
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There is a lot of stuff to remove and replace in order to get to the cams on that bike but with shim-over buckets you don't even have to remove the camshafts to adjust the lash.
$1200 to adjust valve lash and do a carb sync.... Rip off.

I have to disagree with the mechanic that says not to check 'em till you get hard starting.
Damage could be done by that time when talking about the Japanese machines.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I haven't had the valve clearance checked since I've owned the bike, and with it being more than 10 years old, the dealers don't want to work on it. I need to find an independent mechanic to do it.
I'm sure if I took my 17 year old truck into the dealer, he would work on it for me. (Probably charge me an arm and a leg, but he would work on it!)
 
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