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Discussion Starter #1
So I just moved to Denver, CO and I planned on getting a bike (cruiser or all-rounder) to commute to my office because I'm a stingy ******* and I don't want to buy a 4-wheeled vehicle and pay for all the expensive work that usually entails (and gas, and insurance).

I was about to buy a Honda 919 or an SV650, but then I realized that it snows in Denver, and it can get cold. Is it even worth getting a bike in late August?

How many riding days are there in a typical Colorado winter?

:coffee:
 

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Subversive
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No.

And depending on the bike, the cheaper maintenance thing is a myth... :D

That said, I did it last year around this time and I like riding my bike... :p

I rode her until the white stuff got serious... Then put her in the shop and told them to take their sweet time fixing it... LOL
 

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Subversive
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So, even if I have a garage, and can easily hop on the bus stop outside my house for the bad days, it still ain't worth it?

My point was really........that it's worth it IF it's worth it to YOU....

You noticed I said I got one anyhow right?

I don't know how often it snows there or freezes....

But is this really about savings? Cause if it is AFAIK busses are cheap as all get out...
 

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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If you decide to buy a bike, there is an advantage to purchasing a bike in the Fall. Going into winter dealers are anxious to reduce inventory and will lower prices and even individuals who have been trying to see their bike all summer will get nervous and drop their asking price, sometimes considerably. The worst time to get a good buy is in the Spring.

As for how much you'll get to use it, winters vary widely so it's impossible to predict accurately.
 

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American Legion Rider
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Yep, fall is the best time to purchase. And except for being cold you can ride some times in winter there. Just not as much as I can in Texas. If you have another source to commute, then sure, go for it. Someone who actually lives there will have to say just how many days you can ride even if cold. Heck, when the sun drops, it gets cold even in the summer depending on just where you are there. You'll get used to it. Maybe.:D
 

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How long have you lived in Colorado and Denver? I don't know how to tell you this but---it gets colder than a Witches breast in the mile high city, not to mention ice, snow and the scary black ice!

Sam:biggrin:
 

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I live in Maryland and ride pretty much all year. I'll be throwing on the knobbies around mid-October. If the white stuff gets unbearable, I have to cage it.
 

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We get plenty of snow & ice here, but there are some riding days in all 12 months of the year.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
How long have you lived in Colorado and Denver?...
I'm native, so I know what it's like in general, but I've never ridden a bike through the winter so I wanted to gather some sage advice from this forum.


...Heck, when the sun drops, it gets cold even in the summer depending on just where you are there. You'll get used to it. Maybe.:D
Seeing as I just got back from a couple years in Thailand, facing the cold is gonna be a challenge, but I think I can do it ;)

As far as storing the bike, I plan to have a garage. Unheated, but still a garage. Is this safe, or do I need to park a radiator next to my bike 24/7?!
 

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If you know your own weather then you know more than most of us.
Here, I see temperatures below freezing most days between the middle of December and the end of March but I still ride at least 10 days each month of the year. The key to riding on cold days when there is no snow on the road is being properly dressed. I have a very nice fairing that keeps most of the wind off of me and I own a winter riding jacket that would be comfortable just walking around at 0ºF. On the bike it keeps me warm down to about 20ºF. Without good wind protection your hands will be the hardest thing to keep warm. Until I got my present bike I could only ride down to around 25ºF because no matter what I did I couldn't keep my hands warm below that. One thing I was looking into before I switched bikes was "Hippo Hands". They in essence give you great hand protection but the disadvantage is that you must know your controls by feel since you cannot see the hand grips when they are mounted. The plus is warm hands even when wearing nothing more than simple jersey gloves.
 

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A legend in his own mind
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Parking the bike in an unheated garage will be just fine, I do it every year. Most important is to learn how to winterize it for storage if you won't be riding for a while.
We had some members from Colorado, don't know if their still around, I haven't been on as much either.
 

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The 43rd Poser
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If you're buying a bike to "save money", that's not how this works. That's not how ANY of this works....

If you want one because you WANT one, get it. If you want one to enjoy the days you CAN ride, get it.

Go buy a bike... but KNOW that you are not saving any money. The price of purchase is merely the down payment.
 

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Bikes can save you money, it really depends on your situation. I ride more winter than summer and for me the gas savings are huge. Right now gas is cheap though so there's no one right answer when you're buying something you will have for a while.
 

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If this is a first bike neither one of those is a good place to start. The SV650 is the lesser of two evils for that role, but there are plenty of more sane choices to help the learning curve.
 

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So I just moved to Denver, CO and I planned on getting a bike (cruiser or all-rounder) to commute to my office because I'm a stingy ******* and I don't want to buy a 4-wheeled vehicle and pay for all the expensive work that usually entails (and gas, and insurance).

I was about to buy a Honda 919 or an SV650, but then I realized that it snows in Denver, and it can get cold. Is it even worth getting a bike in late August?

How many riding days are there in a typical Colorado winter?

:coffee:
l cannot speak to the weather in Colorado. But l can tell you this...

Motorcycling is not cheaper than driving a car, in most instances. Gas is cheaper, and insurance can go either way. But you need to replace tires every 5,000 miles, as opposed to every 50,000 for a car. l know, there are only 2 tires on a bike. But by the time you add in the cost of having them mounted and balanced, good tires on a bike cost darn near as much as 4 tires for a car. And you replace them every year.

Maintenance, oil changes, brakes....it all adds up. Shops in my area charge $120 an hour. lt is better if you can do some of it yourself.

Then there is the gear. $500 to get started, usually, and there are always new things to buy. Different everything for all seasons.

Just my opinion.
 

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New tires every 5,000 miles? Not for me. More like 12,000 - 15,000.

There are tires and driving styles that wear tires quickly, but I suggest not buying those tires or driving like that.

My current Metzler Roadtecs have near 5,000 miles and still have lots of life left.
 

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Subversive
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It depends a lot on the bike and the rider.. Bikes can be fairly economical, this is evidenced by their wide spread use by poorer folks in poorer countries.. Not everyone has a $12K bike with cool gear and racing tires... Most folks around these parts are not into bikes for economy in the first place which puts a totally different spin on things...

A nice low cost bike can get you around on the cheap.. But like anything else, it all depends on the details...
 
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