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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi
im looking to buy 250-500cc road motorcycle (no off road)

can u suggest a motorcycle which i will be able to maintenance by my self?
motorcycle with repair guides and videos online like youtube etc.....
videos like replacing enging/gear oil and filters etc.....

i was thinking of honda cbr 250, what do u say?
 

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hi
im looking to buy 250-500cc road motorcycle (no off road)

can u suggest a motorcycle which i will be able to maintenance by my self?
motorcycle with repair guides and videos online like youtube etc.....
videos like replacing enging/gear oil and filters etc.....

i was thinking of honda cbr 250, what do u say?
Really depends on how deep you want to go down that rabbit hole. With the wealth of videos available, I'd say it is really dependent on what tools and equipment you have available or are willing to buy and not so much your motorcycle model. Anyone can easily change all the fluids, adjust levers, or clean/adjust the chain with a minimal set of tools but you can go as far as getting a small lift and changing your own tires, checking and adjusting valves, changing spark plugs, etc. It's really up to you! If you have an idea of what motorcycles you'd like, check for dedicated forums and YT vids and buy it!
 

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Not sure I would buy a bike based on availability of online videos. Just spit balling but if you're motivated and have an OK mechanical aptitude yearly maintenance is possible using a basic tool set and service manual.

As Doc said above - it's a bit of a rabbit hole.

How do you view your mechanical abilities? What was the last thing you fixed yourself?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
im fixing my own toyota yaris 2003
im replacing disc brakes drum brakes, i replace flue enjectors , abs computer, coils, battery, spark plugs etc
im replacing engine oil gear oil break fluid air filter ac filter oil filter
i had MZ 250 and i greased the chain replace oil etc..... ( i sold my 1993 mz)
by the way i am mechanical engineer
 

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would u seggest a bike with high (mechanic) videos and guides online?
I find a few high quality vids much better than many mediocre ones. As cmonSTART noted, you shouldn't necessarily make that your sole criteria. I do find it very helpful though, and have attempted waaaay more maintenance than I would have ever thought of doing without them... with mixed results! :smile_big:
 

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I agree with the above. There are a lot of other things to be considered. Is this the type of bike I want? Is it a good fit? Are you tall? Are you short?

That being said, I think a good place to start looking would be a Kawasaki Ninja 250. There is an abundance of used ones available, they are affordable, a simple machine, and there are lots of videos out there to help you work on them.
 

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Planing to do maintenance yourself you might want to think about how complicated the valve lash adjustment service will be.
Bikes like the Yamaha V-Star 650 have rocker arms so the cams do not have to come out to make adjustments.
I can't remember if the carburetors have to be lifted up on that model in order to remove the plastic head covers or if I'm confusing it with a different model, (the 1100)?
Even so, bikes with rocker arms are less complicated when doing valve lash adjustments than bikes that use what's called 'shim under buckets'.
Bikes with shim under buckets require camshaft removal and shim changes to make adjustments.
Just one of many things to think about...

BTW, 2007 was the last year that the Ninja 250 used rocker arms. Stating in 2008 they went to shim under buckets, same for the Ninja 300.
One advantage of the shim under types is that the adjustment interval is sometimes many thousands of miles longer than the rocker arm types.

Setting the carb synchronization, or throttle body synch, is an easy job on most multi cylinder bikes (but not older Suzy Intruders) although you'll need a special tool for the job.
Carb synch is of course not a service required on single cylinder, and / or, single carb machines.
Stop me before I write a book..:surprise:
 

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cbr 250

Oh Yeah, the CBR 250.

I haven't serviced one that I can remember but it does have rocker arms for the valve actuation.
Looking at the parts diagram I'm not sure what's involved in adjusting valve lash on that particular type of design.
It looks like the kind where you slide the forked rocker arm to the side to access the shim sitting on top of the valve but I don't see the corresponding 'keeper spring' that type usually has.
If you check it out on YouTube.... you can tell me. :wink2:
 

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Japanese bikes from the 1980's are super easy to work on and parts are plentiful and cheap. As a bonus, those 80's bikes are built like tanks and incredibly reliable. Avoid anything that has a computer and fuel injection...makes repairs 10x more difficult.

I have an 83 Honda Nighthawk 550...a 10 and 12mm wrench/socket, screwdriver, pliers and a few allen wrenches and you can disassemble the entire bike. Electronics are super simple and a voltmeter with some basic knowledge can fix any electrical issue.

High tech = High cost to repair....and with so many "High tech" components "Made in China" you're in for some expensive repairs.
 

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The Ninja EX500r series is very popular and I loved the bike personally (Had 4 of them at one time). The major problem you run into with them is only a few things, number one since they don't make them no more, you would be sourcing new parts that is not necessarily Kawasaki, but they did make them from 1987-2009. The other issue like any bike is they tend to be garage queens and the carbs get funky and need to be serviced a lot of times when you acquire them. Last but not least and is limited to the first gen 1987-1994 models is the flywheel blowing apart and there is a mod to fix that my doing minor grinding on a 2nd gen flywheel. I am a fan of the EX500r and fully recommend them as a great bike to start on and stay on and continue to enjoy. They handle highway speeds well, and easy to maintain and there is a large following of that lil 500cc model.
 
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