Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 54 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am 16 and have always loved motorcycles and have lived on the back of one. I have a moped right now and live in the uk so motorcycles + rain/cold road conditions are never good. driving for 4 months (2k miles). however I have fallen off 2 times. fortunately I am okay and my moped runs fine but has some damaged body panels. both times under 10 mph and because the wheels have slipped in the wet and cold. I think it is because I used my front break too aggressively. but honestly despite being a new rider, is falling off 2 times too many in 4 months? when I am 17 I would like a 125 but if I can't even handle a 50cc in the wet is it best if I give up and get a car (I use my moped everyday to go to school and back). feeling quite **** about falling off twice to be honest. ?
 

·
Registered
2015 BMW K1600GTL & 2008 Harley Davidson Dyna Super Glide Custom
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
I am 16 and have always loved motorcycles and have lived on the back of one. I have a moped right now and live in the uk so motorcycles + rain/cold road conditions are never good. driving for 4 months (2k miles). however I have fallen off 2 times. fortunately I am okay and my moped runs fine but has some damaged body panels. both times under 10 mph and because the wheels have slipped in the wet and cold. I think it is because I used my front break too aggressively. but honestly despite being a new rider, is falling off 2 times too many in 4 months? when I am 17 I would like a 125 but if I can't even handle a 50cc in the wet is it best if I give up and get a car (I use my moped everyday to go to school and back). feeling quite **** about falling off twice to be honest.
1. Check your tires.
2. Are there any riding courses in your area you can take?

Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk
 

·
Moderator - Like a crazy cat lady but with bikes!
Joined
·
1,210 Posts
It's alright, most riders have fallen off once or twice. I've been riding for two seasons now and in those two seasons I covered more distance on two wheels than on four. I've also ridden almost a dozen bikes in that timeframe. Despite all of that, even I have had two crashes. Interestingly, both of them happened riding a scooter/moped. Two wheelers are already hard to control in the wet and to me scooters are perhaps the hardest of the bunch. Not a lot of contact patch and usually very cheap, slippery tires. And forget it if it's a Chinese scooter.

If you haven't already, I'd take a riding course. If you have, give it time. You'll get better as you gain skill and learn from lessons. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
501 Posts
Scooters and mopeds are amazingly less stable than full-on motorcycles, as others have indicated. In addition to the factors mentioned above, it also has to do with the size of the tire - the gyroscopic stability is less because the wheel is smaller in diameter. This also causes smaller road imperfections to influence your stability. Larger tires have less radical curvature and roll over stuff better. All of which is to say, things will get mechanically easier as you progress.

Another factor is your riding conditions. You are a new rider and you are riding in challenging conditions. It seems unsurprising that this leads to more spills, especially at the low speeds at which your stability is minimal.

All of that said, far be it from me to proselytize motorcycles. If you don't feel like riding is for you, then don't. You have nothing to prove and should not feel any obligation to ride if you don't want to.

I probably fell over five or six times when learning my first bike, and it was a 500 in dry conditions and smooth roads. O.O
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,700 Posts
Don't beat yourself up about two get-offs in a few months. When I was first learning, it was almost a daily event. Just get up, dust yourself off, or shake the mud off, get back on and go again. In 40 some years it'll be something you'll laugh about with your buds. :)
 

·
Warning: Mood change in 3... 2... 1...
Joined
·
284 Posts
Did you already pass your CBT? Or are you riding under a provisional license of some sort? As above, I wouldn’t call it quits after a couple minor-ish tumbles but would be looking at why they are happening and fix that before it becomes a major event. Best wishes!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,848 Posts
Make a note of what you think you did wrong. Work on that. Later something else will happen. Work on that. One thing at a time. Go easy on the front brake going slow. Maybe tap the rear brake.

On another note. Even if it is someone else's fault, work on a way to prevent it.

UK
 

·
Very Famous Person
Joined
·
9,873 Posts
--

Sometimes conditions are such that even an experienced rider will crash. I ride 20-25,000 miles every year and yet recently I dumped my bike as I was accelerating hard and ran across some pea gravel in a divider section and my rear wheel spun out from under me. Didn't see the gravel with its lack of traction.

So we all can come upon moments when anyone could dump their bike. An important outcome is if you use the experience to learn from. Not to fear it, but conquer it. Analyze, learn and move on.

--
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
21,729 Posts
So we all can come upon moments when anyone could dump their bike. An important outcome is if you use the experience to learn from. Not to fear it, but conquer it. Analyze, learn and move on.
+1 what Ron said here. Do you know what you did wrong and have you corrected it? That's the key to riding. We are always learning or should be. Low speed maneuvers are harder than high speed anyway. Consider yourself lucky you went down at low speed rather than high. I had my crash at 70mph. It hurts much more. Trust me on that. Learn from those low speed crashes and keep going. The biggest thing in that is to get over your pride issue. You just know everyone and their bother or sister saw you.

By the way, since I don't think anyone suggested what to do in the future, with wet or gravel road conditions and until you gain much more experience, use your rear brake more than front. That's just the opposite of normal riding conditions. But you don't learn how much you can use the front brake in those conditions without trying. It's a total learning experience. It's generally safer to use the rear brake in those conditions.

I have to force myself to use the rear as I'm so used to using the front only. In low speed you have the time. That unfortunately, could have been the cause of my high speed crash in rain too though. That or chopped throttle. Or both. I don't know and no one else does as there were no witnesses. Learn and move on. You'll get it in time. ? ? ?
 

·
Visionary
Joined
·
3,799 Posts
Don't give up, learn from your mistakes and don't make the same one again. Find some sort of beginner riding course and take it and talk to the instructor about the issues you have had. I commute on my bike so I ride in a lot more bad weather than many others in the US where many of us tend to be fair weather riders (Oh I'll get flamed for that..), and there definitely are some important techniques to learn about riding in cold, wet, or even snowy weather. You also might need better tires, some are downright awful in the rain, others are so good they almost let you ignore the wet roads.
I've been good/lucky and no crashes in a lot of miles/years but 40 years ago when I learned to ride (dirt bikes and 50cc mopeds, then real bikes) I wiped out quite a few times too, it's part of the learning process, learning what NOT to do :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: Retired Guy

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
It's alright, most riders have fallen off once or twice. I've been riding for two seasons now and in those two seasons I covered more distance on two wheels than on four. I've also ridden almost a dozen bikes in that timeframe. Despite all of that, even I have had two crashes. Interestingly, both of them happened riding a scooter/moped. Two wheelers are already hard to control in the wet and to me scooters are perhaps the hardest of the bunch. Not a lot of contact patch and usually very cheap, slippery tires. And forget it if it's a Chinese scooter.

If you haven't already, I'd take a riding course. If you have, give it time. You'll get better as you gain skill and learn from lessons. :)
Ye in the UK we have to pass a course to drive, which basically says you can drive a 2 wheeler safely in the dry and wet and do all the manoeuvres etc etc. It is a Chinese scooter too ?. I am eyeing uo a duke 125 or a r125 if I do get another. so if I stick with it I should hopefully get better!?
 

·
Registered
2015 BMW K1600GTL & 2008 Harley Davidson Dyna Super Glide Custom
Joined
·
1,281 Posts
What should I check for in my tyres and I've already done a course
How are the tread? Any cracks? How old are they?



Sent from my Pixel 3a using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Don't give up, learn from your mistakes and don't make the same one again. Find some sort of beginner riding course and take it and talk to the instructor about the issues you have had. I commute on my bike so I ride in a lot more bad weather than many others in the US where many of us tend to be fair weather riders (Oh I'll get flamed for that..), and there definitely are some important techniques to learn about riding in cold, wet, or even snowy weather. You also might need better tires, some are downright awful in the rain, others are so good they almost let you ignore the wet roads.
I've been good/lucky and no crashes in a lot of miles/years but 40 years ago when I learned to ride (dirt bikes and 50cc mopeds, then real bikes) I wiped out quite a few times too, it's part of the learning process, learning what NOT to do :)
Yes in the UK we have to pass a course which talks about driving in the wet and cold etc etc. So you think its normal and hopefully should get better. Another user commented on Chinese scooters not being best ], mines a Chinese scooter and the tyres area bit sketchy but well within the uk requirements ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Scooters and mopeds are amazingly less stable than full-on motorcycles, as others have indicated. In addition to the factors mentioned above, it also has to do with the size of the tire - the gyroscopic stability is less because the wheel is smaller in diameter. This also causes smaller road imperfections to influence your stability. Larger tires have less radical curvature and roll over stuff better. All of which is to say, things will get mechanically easier as you progress.

Another factor is your riding conditions. You are a new rider and you are riding in challenging conditions. It seems unsurprising that this leads to more spills, especially at the low speeds at which your stability is minimal.

All of that said, far be it from me to proselytize motorcycles. If you don't feel like riding is for you, then don't. You have nothing to prove and should not feel any obligation to ride if you don't want to.

I probably fell over five or six times when learning my first bike, and it was a 500 in dry conditions and smooth roads. O.O
Thank you! makes me feel a lot better, during my commute I go on some awful roads. most roads in the uk seems to be. but hopefully I should get better. I feel like riding is for me as I love the feeling of driving in the summer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
Don't beat yourself up about two get-offs in a few months. When I was first learning, it was almost a daily event. Just get up, dust yourself off, or shake the mud off, get back on and go again. In 40 some years it'll be something you'll laugh about with your buds. :)
:)) makes me feel a lot better
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Did you already pass your CBT? Or are you riding under a provisional license of some sort? As above, I wouldn’t call it quits after a couple minor-ish tumbles but would be looking at why they are happening and fix that before it becomes a major event. Best wishes!
Yes I passed my CBT, ironically I did it in the wet, and after passing your cat you ca drive under a provisional license
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
Make a note of what you think you did wrong. Work on that. Later something else will happen. Work on that. One thing at a time. Go easy on the front brake going slow. Maybe tap the rear brake.

On another note. Even if it is someone else's fault, work on a way to prevent it.

UK
Yes, I have already stated bring that, I am leaving a much bigger gap between myself an the car upfront and braking a lot earlier, driving like a granny. but a safe granny nonetheless
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Thanks!! I drove super carefully today
--

Sometimes conditions are such that even an experienced rider will crash. I ride 20-25,000 miles every year and yet recently I dumped my bike as I was accelerating hard and ran across some pea gravel in a divider section and my rear wheel spun out from under me. Didn't see the gravel with its lack of traction.

So we all can come upon moments when anyone could dump their bike. An important outcome is if you use the experience to learn from. Not to fear it, but conquer it. Analyze, learn and move on.

--
Thank you!! I have been driving super carefully as I was bit tentative but I got into the swing of things and feel much better. ?
 
1 - 20 of 54 Posts
Top