Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey all,
I am prepping for a bike purchase next Fall and wanted to get advice on jumping to a larger bike. I have been riding a 1980 KZ550C LTD for a few years on and off (3 seasons total) and will ride it all next season as well. My bike is about 465 lbs and 550 cc and i am interested in a Triumph Thunderbird, Victory Highball, or a HD Street bob or similar. My concern is the added weight but mostly the added power. What are your opinions? Am I making too large of a jump? I'm 6'1" and 240 lbs if that makes a difference. I plan on doing some test rides next summer but wanted to get some advice before I get too far in my research. Thanks in advance
 

·
Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
Joined
·
14,300 Posts
Are you having any issues controlling your current bike?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
809 Posts
This is a GREAT question!

I would also ask:

-- how many miles have you put on your current bike in three years?
-- have you had any formal riding courses or training?


Are you having any issues controlling your current bike?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,909 Posts
Squeeze me.

If you have figured out how to squeeze the throttle and the brakes, rather than grabbing big chunks of either, you may be able to move up to a bigger bike. If you are still having scary moments from any event, I would stay with what you have for a while.
My main winter bike is an 84 XS400.

Unkle Crusty*
 

·
Gone
Joined
·
23,907 Posts
None of those motorcycles listed put out a lot of horsepower. I would be more concerned with the weight. If you are comfortable with low speed maneuvers, it shouldn't be a problem after some practice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,168 Posts
I got to a 1300cc, 700+ pound Yamaha directly from a small 500cc Honda twin. The extra 150 or more pounds mean nothing once the bike is rolling. That Highball with the 1731cc, 106/6, engine is heavy but not like my present 900 pound Vision. Be careful writing off the power on it. It does not have the power of a super sport bike but it has plenty to get you in lots of trouble. My 106/6 is giving me 98 HP, 112 ft-lb at the rear wheel and if my bike was as light as the Highball I would have trouble keeping the front wheel on the ground.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
No issues controlling my current bike but I have been wondering if that is due to weight and power or due to practice and experience. I had a couple instances of minor rear wheel skid during emergency braking but got that under control now. I've put roughly 3.5k miles on the bike and did my MSF basic rider course a number of years ago. I've thought about going back for a refresher or taking a different class. Another concern I have is that I'd also be switching riding positions. I'm used to having my feet under me rather than stretched out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
809 Posts
I'm used to having my feet under me rather than stretched out.
This turned out to be huge for me! I just couldn't get used to riding "feet first" on short test rides, so I ended up getting a standard instead of a cruiser. I may have gotten used to it if I'd given it more of a chance, but I didn't want to buy a bike and take a chance that I wouldn't be able to get used to it - or that I might not like it even if I did get used to it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
89 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all for your replies. It seems like the general consensus is to practice low speed maneuvers and get as much road time as I can next season. Has anyone else had issues switching riding positions with a new bike? Anyone found one style to be more comfortable? I've always heard that cruisers are most comfortable and sport bikes the least but I guess it just depends on the person and the bike?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
Moving up in HP/weight is not an issue as long as you give yourself time to adjust to the bigger bike and learn the differences.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,168 Posts
I love the kicked back position on my Vision. The Highball is not as kicked back as my Vision but does not force your feet back up under your seat like some of the other bikes do. It is sort of a compromise on positions. It took me almost 20 miles to move to a stretched out riding position from the cramped position of a "standard" bike. I find it almost painful to go back, even for a short ride.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top