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If this picture of Tupac Shakur on a scooter doesn't settle the debate about scooters and manhood, nothing will.

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They say when a man drives a really expensive car or has one of those huge lifted trucks that he's compensating for his fallic inadequacy.

So then what does my cheap, little micro-car say about my adequacy? 馃槣

I've actually been trying to research and study the male personality to figure out why I'm so different. It turns out that the male ego is driven by its insecurity. All men are insecure, but the higher you are in the male social-sexual hierarchy the more insecure you are. The alpha is the most insecure of all and thats why he tries so hard to gain other people's respect and to reach the top.

Its true most men wouldn't be caught dead on a scooter. Their insecure ego dictates that every single thing they do be done in an effort to climb the male social-sexual ladder and become the alpha. Climbing onto the scooter is just not possible for them.

I think I'm the ultra rare sigma male (somehow born without the insecure ego and doesn't respect the hierarchy) so thats why its so bizarre to me to see seemingly every man in the world acting so silly about something like a scooter or 1000 other things every day. Nobody cares what you ride or what you do. You'll be way happier if you just let go of all that social pressure and ego and enjoy life for what it is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #85 ·
I don't know where you came up with the conclusion that "most men wouldn't be caught dead on a scooter ". I think it is a small percentage of men who feel that way, probably the same men who are more enamored of being seen on their Harley than in riding it (just go out on any beautiful day for riding and pass the bars with bunches of Harley's parked in front). These are the men that need to get the approval of others and who strike a pose of being a tough guy by riding, or at least owning a motorcycle. Go to Europe, South America, Asia, Africa and other parts of the world and see millions of men riding scooters of all types. My primary ride now is a motorcycle, albeit a 3 wheeler, but I still love riding my Honda PCX150. If insecure men are too intimated to ride a fun vehicle (a scooter) then those are probably the same men who are scared to death to ever wear a pink shirt.
 

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Full disclosure:

In about 2003, I bought a new Yamaha Zuma, 50cc, 2 stroke Scooter ostensibly for my 15 1/2 year old Son to learn on and to take his Motorcycle DMV riders test on. At the same time, my personal ride was a new 2003 Honda VTX 1800R-Retro. I rode both quite frequently on my daily 10 mile commute to work, where I immediately measured my ah, Manhood and found no discernible difference between 50cc and the 1800cc experience.:eek:

two years ago I had arguably the most VISCIOUS bike around and factually the LARGEST factory engine, my Triumph Rocket 3 Roadster and also had a Suzuki 650 Burgman Scooter and using my left over College Fraternity, 'Pedermeter,' I discovered that no matter what form of transportation I rode or drove, my 'Chubby' remained the same.:cry:

Sam :rofl2:
 

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Full disclosure:

In about 2003, I bought a new Yamaha Zuma, 50cc, 2 stroke Scooter ostensibly for my 15 1/2 year old Son to learn on and to take his Motorcycle DMV riders test on. At the same time, my personal ride was a new 2003 Honda VTX 1800R-Retro. I rode both quite frequently on my daily 10 mile commute to work, where I immediately measured my ah, Manhood and found no discernible difference between 50cc and the 1800cc experience.:eek:

two years ago I had arguably the most VISCIOUS bike around and factually the LARGEST factory engine, my Triumph Rocket 3 Roadster and also had a Suzuki 650 Burgman Scooter and using my left over College Fraternity, 'Pedermeter,' I discovered that no matter what form of transportation I rode or drove, my 'Chubby' remained the same.:cry:

Sam :rofl2:
I agree, but I like to say weird stuff. I attribute that to the metal plate in my head.馃し鈥嶁檪锔
 

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In America at least, riders seem to look down on scooters as less than a motorcycle, rather than just different from a motorcycle. So many who have ridden motorcycles for years or decades, but have never been on a scooter nor do they have any interest in riding one, don't know how much they are short changing themselves. Maybe because I started my love of riding two wheeled motorized vehicles on a scooter, and a pretty capable one, I have never dissed them or those that ride them. But even I have to admit that there is a stigma to the traditional scooter with its tiny engine, tiny wheels, and whose riders do not seem to want to be part of the riding fraternity.

My primary ride is a Honda Goldwing, and while I am getting ready to trade that bike in for something lighter (I am getting older and worry about handling 920 pounds under some circumstances) I do want to have a real motorcycle in my garage for the riding that I cannot do on a scooter. But I also own a Honda PCX150 and riding that scooter is pure fun. I just got back from a 75 minute, 60 mile ride on country roads north of the city where I live. The roads had posted limits of 45 and 55 mph, and my scooter has no trouble keeping up those speeds and typically 10 over the posted speed. While I do not have the power to pass a slow vehicle in a short distance as I can with my Goldwing, the scooter handles these roads just fine and with confidence. And I do this riding while getting between 93 and 105 mpg routinely. In the mile ride home from the gas station where I stopped to refill, the scooter read 135 mpg since fillup!

So if you are a scooterist, don't feel that you are lesser than a motorcyclist. In fact, you may well be having a lot more fun than that rider pushing a heavy bike through slower city traffic that the scooter just zips through. I feel like I have the best of both worlds owning one of each type ride. Ride safe!

Old post I know, but I'm on a scooter now. A small Vespa. It's awesome. I love it. Don't care what anyone thinks. I can putt around all one legged and get my "wind in the hair" fix.
 

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Discussion Starter · #91 ·
The Vespa is certainly capable, and seems very well built. The demo ride I took on a Vespa 300 was very impressive. But I didn't like the set up, with essentially nothing in front of you as you are riding, and everything sort of below your normal field of vision. And where several newer Japanese and German scooters have increased the wheel size, the Vespa still uses the tiny 10" wheels (I think that they are 10"). And Vespa is expensive. When I looked at them back in 2019 they were about $8,000 compared to the $4,000 I paid for a new Honda PCX150. Granted that the Vespa had an engine twice the size of my Honda, but I decided I didn't want to spend that much. Plus I thought my wife would ride the scooter, and the seat of the Vespa is quite high. But there is no doubt that it is a very capable machine. I have never seen one, however, on the Interstate.
 

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The Vespa is certainly capable, and seems very well built. The demo ride I took on a Vespa 300 was very impressive. But I didn't like the set up, with essentially nothing in front of you as you are riding, and everything sort of below your normal field of vision. And where several newer Japanese and German scooters have increased the wheel size, the Vespa still uses the tiny 10" wheels (I think that they are 10"). And Vespa is expensive. When I looked at them back in 2019 they were about $8,000 compared to the $4,000 I paid for a new Honda PCX150. Granted that the Vespa had an engine twice the size of my Honda, but I decided I didn't want to spend that much. Plus I thought my wife would ride the scooter, and the seat of the Vespa is quite high. But there is no doubt that it is a very capable machine. I have never seen one, however, on the Interstate.

This is an OLD Vespa. It was bought in 1990 in Austin, I'll get you specs. It's not fast at all. The guy bought two of these from a company that rented them out to putt around Austin. It's perfect for that. It's also pink and white, but it's so easy going and fun to ride, even if it's slow. Scooters are cool.
 

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What I see as the major difference between scooters and motorcycles is the former having lack of upper frame rigidity and an odd-to-me riding position. Even when I consider high-mpg 2-wheeled runabouts they have the geometry of full frames on their side, large wheels, and a motorcycle riding position. I am also very much a shift-for-myself guy with gear selection not merely being easy for me, but absolutely a necessary part of being in command of my vehicle.

I almost have to force myself to drive my snowplow (Sportsman 570 ATV) on little jaunts around the neighborhood and a long mile to town. It needs exercise, but holds a lot less joy than my DRZ, and I doubt it gets much better fuel economy. I think it is much like riding a scooter - shiftless, happy at low speeds, kind-of okay handling, and provides the open-air feeling of a motorcycle.
 

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When it comes down to it scooter riders we really don't give a F--- what people think. That's what makes us different. We don't need or seek anyones approval. We ride because we love to. We answer to no one, and could give a S--- if someone doesn't like it, or our bikes.

If some ask me why don't I ride a real bike, I tell them 'when they make one, let me know'. Until then,I'm going for a ride.

- Wolf
 

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In my state, scooters or mopeds that have engines of 50cc or less, and can't exceed some fairly low speed limit (45 mph, if memory serves) do not require a class M license.
People can use these things with only a regular driver's license.
If I see a small scooter in traffic, or going slow in a neighborhood's narrow street, I don't know the engine size of that bike at a glance.
I don't know if that person has studied anything about riding on 2 wheels.
So, I'm hesitant to consider that person a real biker.
Of course I'll still treat him or her the same way, with respect on the roads.

I'd like to own a scooter, if it were capable of hauling my heavy butt up the steep hills of my area of north Georgia, in the foothills of the Appalachian mountains.
If that scooter were legal to use on the interstate highways, if my route demanded a short section of superslab for a few exits. I'd want to reach at least 70 mph to keep from being a road hazard.
But off the interstate is where I want to be and try to be when I plan my routes, and I'm fine with doing 45 if that's the speed limit. If the speed limit is 55, then that's what I'll do also.

I test drove a 150cc scooter then, years later, a 200 cc model (both cheap, Chinese made), and they lacked the power to get me up to 55 MPH on even gentle hills.
 

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In my state, scooters or mopeds that have engines of 50cc or less, and can't exceed some fairly low speed limit (45 mph, if memory serves) do not require a class M license.
People can use these things with only a regular driver's license.
If I see a small scooter in traffic, or going slow in a neighborhood's narrow street, I don't know the engine size of that bike at a glance.
I don't know if that person has studied anything about riding on 2 wheels.
So, I'm hesitant to consider that person a real biker.
Of course I'll still treat him or her the same way, with respect on the roads.

I'd like to own a scooter, if it were capable of hauling my heavy butt up the steep hills of my area of north Georgia, in the foothills of the Appalachian mountains.
If that scooter were legal to use on the interstate highways, if my route demanded a short section of superslab for a few exits. I'd want to reach at least 70 mph to keep from being a road hazard.
But off the interstate is where I want to be and try to be when I plan my routes, and I'm fine with doing 45 if that's the speed limit. If the speed limit is 55, then that's what I'll do also.

I test drove a 150cc scooter then, years later, a 200 cc model (both cheap, Chinese made), and they lacked the power to get me up to 55 MPH on even gentle hills.
Scooters can go up to 700ccs with the size and power to accomadate any rider. 150 - 200cc are only in the Sports style range and may be good for city commutes or short day trips. It sounds like you may want a Maxi scooter - 250 - and higher cc range.

Some Chineses models are poorly made and probably not a good example of what's out there. My last bike was 300cc - Kymco Downtown 300i, and capable of going 90 mph. I've ridden her from Philadelphia to the Jersey shore, Pitsuburgh, PA, Ottawa, Ontario Canada and to the Cabot Trail in northern Nova Scotia, Candada. Each ride was on major interstates where I had no problem running with the big boys.

My lastest scooter is the Kymco AK 550. It's a Touring (Maxi) scooter capable of going 112 mph. So far I've ridden from Philly all through New England to the Laconia Motorcycle Rally in New Hampshire and to Ottawa, again back in September.

Check out my motovlog to get a sense of my rides and bikes -


- Wolf
 
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