Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 20 of 72 Posts

·
ZAMM Fanatic
Joined
·
2,732 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
A big issues with scooters is life expectancy. I give a cheap Chinese 50cc scooter a year, maybe two. Something will break, a cheap molded hose will crack, and it will lead to the destruction of the bike.

In contrast, I got 12,000 miles out of my 1985 Honda Elite 250 before everything needed replacing --- shocks, brakes, tires, clutch, variator, muffler, instrument panel, speedometer cable, wheel bearings, ..... and that was over 30 years, so some of it was just age, not wear. It's still on the road, albeit with a different owner, and I regularly see 250's for sale, or described in forums with 20,000+ miles.

I picked up a 600cc Silverwing with 10,000, a 2007 model,a nd it's good to go. Someone had already put tires on it, and...basically needs nothing.

So it seems to be directly related to engine size, how long a scoot can POTENTIALLY last, how hard that little motor is being tasked to run. Let's face it, most 50cc's are run flat-out all day long.

So what's your make & mileage expectancy on YOUR scooter.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
943 Posts
I picked up a 1962 Honda C100 50cc last August for a song. It starts and runs beautifully. Don't know how many actual miles it has on it because the speedometer cable has been broken for years and the wiring needs a lot of work. Most of the plastic is in good shape but faded. I plan to restore it to like-new condition. It is in amazingly good shape for being 52 years old and all original parts.
 

·
Greatest Member Ever
Joined
·
662 Posts
As a professional motorcycle mechanic, I concur with Wade's assessment of chinese mopeds. They are cheaply made disposable garbage. Here in Hawaii, they are every where. Typical life span of a moped made in China is 5000 miles at best (and that usually includes a top end rebuild along the way). I have come across 1 or 2 that have made it to 10,000 miles, but that is VERY rare indeed.

One of my shop errand bikes is a 1985 Honda Elite 150 cc scooter. It has 23,000 miles on the clock and is ridden every day. I trust this scooter completely.

Some other brands that aren't too bad:
Kymco (Korean)
Sym DD50 (Taiwan) (uses a Honda Dio motor and japanese carb and electronics).
 

·
Gone.
Joined
·
17,873 Posts
A few years ago when I worked at an Aprillia dealership some guy brought in a 50cc Aprillia scooter that had either 23 or 27 thousand miles on it. I can't remember exactly which but we were all pretty amazed.
 

·
Troublemaker
Joined
·
2,520 Posts
My neighbor has 45,000+ miles on a 650 Burgmann. I don't think it's ever been in the shop for anything more than tires and oil changes.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,559 Posts
Life span

Made in China. One year. I gave away my electric scooter, including all the spares, which was about 2 extra scooters.
Tools made in China. About one year, unless it is a name brand, and then maybe 3 to 5 years.
Meanwhile my 79 XS11 and my 83 XS400 should outlast me. I have spare engines for both, and a spare rear end and shaft, for the XS11.
Can report more next year when I pick up the 200 Vespa.

Unkle Crusty*
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
518 Posts
So what's a good cheap scooter? Something to screw around with? Those Chinese ones are easy enough to get, but I think something that's made so wrong it could never be made right would just annoy me.
 

·
Greatest Member Ever
Joined
·
662 Posts
A few years ago when I worked at an Aprillia dealership some guy brought in a 50cc Aprillia scooter that had either 23 or 27 thousand miles on it. I can't remember exactly which but we were all pretty amazed.
Aprilla makes some nice high-end motorcycles. It wouldn't surprise me that their mopeds are equally well made. Just like Vespa and Piaggio.

One trick I find the chinese manufacturers doing is putting "fake" names on their mopeds. Like "Abruzzi", or "Arilla", or any number of other names that might make a buyer think it's the same quality as an Italian or Japanese built machine.
 

·
Greatest Member Ever
Joined
·
662 Posts
So what's a good cheap scooter? Something to screw around with? Those Chinese ones are easy enough to get, but I think something that's made so wrong it could never be made right would just annoy me.
Bines, You can buy a brand new Sym DD50 for less than $2000. Add about $350 worth of add-on upgrades and you have a Honda Elite quality moped that can hit 60MPH....
 

·
Female Rider
Joined
·
9,324 Posts
Not sure what you are looking for Bines or what you plan to do with it. I have a 2005 Yamaha Zuma 50cc. Not sure how long it will last but it's still going strong.

It is street legal and no license is needed for it in Missouri. We camp in a state forest a lot and it will haul my husband and myself around. We've ridden it on many dirt and gravel roads and it's gotten us anywhere we tried to go even though on some hills we were down to 10 or 15 mph. That is riding 2 up.

Riding with just myself on it I can do 40 mph unless I'm going up a fairly steep hill. I have ridden it to town and work which is about 4 miles away on blacktop roads. It's lots of fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
My father has a 50cc Tomos Nitro scooter, I think it's 2012/13. He bought it almost brand new, but the catch was it had sat on this dudes lawn for about a year with 30 other scooters. He was a bit crazy. It has like 400 miles now, and the rear indicators have drooped and the pins holding them in broke. Whenever you fill it up, it'll leak out the exhaust if you don't burn some down. It's pegged 100% of the time, due to it doing 30 going downhill with a tailwind. I plan on dumping it on someone some spring time and letting him get a bigger bike.
 

·
Gone.
Joined
·
17,873 Posts
Made in China. One year. I gave away my electric scooter, including all the spares, which was about 2 extra scooters.
Tools made in China. About one year, unless it is a name brand, and then maybe 3 to 5 years.
I agree, and most Chinese tools will last just fine as long as you don't use them too often. :)

On the other hand, I don't know what the Chinese name brands are, but I have a milling machine made in Taiwan in 1983 and it's a reliable and hard working piece of machinery. It's a bit quirky and it's certainly no Bridgeport, but it seems to be a lot better made than many of the import mills that you can buy today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,336 Posts
I had a little Honda Spree 50 in high school...l admit l was pretty goofy looking on it, a 6'3" stick riding a tiny moped. I rode the piss out of it, full throttle at all times. I probably put a couple thousand miles on it and sold it to an old man who rode them around his campground. I actually made $50 on it and l believe it is the only vehicle l have ever sold for more than l paid for it! It got 50 miles a gallon and the tank held half a gallon of gas...the most l ever put in it was 43 cents.

Hey Wade, what kind of mileage do you get on that Silverwing? And what is the attraction? I mean, why have that for your around town bike when you could have a little Ninja or something and get 75 miles an hour?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,559 Posts
Name brand

I agree, and most Chinese tools will last just fine as long as you don't use them too often. :)

On the other hand, I don't know what the Chinese name brands are, but I have a milling machine made in Taiwan in 1983 and it's a reliable and hard working piece of machinery. It's a bit quirky and it's certainly no Bridgeport, but it seems to be a lot better made than many of the import mills that you can buy today.
Up here a major chain store, Canadian Tire has the Mastercraft name on the tools it gets build for them. These last longer than the other made in China stuff they sell. Black & Decker is another brand name. The appeal is the price, as in cheap. But I think it is a false economy. The whole business of US debt being partly foreign financed, in turn being purchased from you and I, by buying Chinese junk. I check everything I buy and will not buy Chinese if possible. They seem incapable of making a decent thermostat. Fortunately there are made in Canada heaters, we can use in the boats. One of my table saws just quit, but it did last about 5 years.
My made in Japan Makita cut off saw is about 20 years old.
I do have some made in Taiwan pieces on my bikes. And clipons Made in Maine.

Unkle Crusty*
 

·
On The Road Again!
Joined
·
2,658 Posts
Bines, You can buy a brand new Sym DD50 for less than $2000. Add about $350 worth of add-on upgrades and you have a Honda Elite quality moped that can hit 60MPH....
Sym is a good one. Keep in mind that Sym has been a major parts supplier for Honda for many years. Their quality control is much better than the Chinese crap.
If I could afford it, I'd buy a Symba in a heartbeat.
Meanwhile, I'm riding the heck out of my trusty '77 Honda Trail 90.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,336 Posts
Up here a major chain store, Canadian Tire has the Mastercraft name on the tools it gets build for them. These last longer than the other made in China stuff they sell. Black & Decker is another brand name. The appeal is the price, as in cheap. But I think it is a false economy. The whole business of US debt being partly foreign financed, in turn being purchased from you and I, by buying Chinese junk. I check everything I buy and will not buy Chinese if possible. They seem incapable of making a decent thermostat. Fortunately there are made in Canada heaters, we can use in the boats. One of my table saws just quit, but it did last about 5 years.
My made in Japan Makita cut off saw is about 20 years old.
I do have some made in Taiwan pieces on my bikes. And clipons Made in Maine.

Unkle Crusty*
Canadian Tire! This brings back memories of a Summer l stayed on my aunt & uncle's farm on the Ontario peninsula. "Everyone, in the car, we're going to Canadian Tire" bellowed uncle Harold. "What's Canadian Tire?" l asked. I had been there a few weeks and they had developed this little game, where every time l asked what something was they thought it was fun to mess with me. So the whole way into Hanover l was told that it was a huge monument, the largest tractor tire in Canada, that it was actually called Canadian TIRED and that it was a drugstore for sleeping pills, on and on and on until we finally got there and l found that it was basically a Sears :)
 

·
Gone.
Joined
·
17,873 Posts
I didn't know that Mastercraft was Chinese made. I've seen that name around here or there but didn't know anything about them. Most of my tools are American made but I have purchased some import stuff in my younger years then up-graded as I could afford to.
 

·
MODERATOR
Joined
·
6,504 Posts
I love scooters and have had a few and still have a 2013 Kymco Xciting 500RI ABS, a 2006 Suzuki Burgman 650 and have had a few more, all purchased new:

A Yamaha Zuma 50cc 2 stroke, a Honda 250 Reflex ABS, an Aprilia Atlantic 500, a Burgman 650 (2003), a Burgman 650 (2007), a Yamaha T-max 500, two Yamaha Zuma 125's and my 2012 Goldwing, maybe not a scooter:biggrin:

I tend not to keep any bike or scooter more than a few years and rarely put more than 5 to 6,000 miles on them. They all have been absolutely trouble free and never saw the service dept of a dealer.

Scooters at least for me, bring back the fun in riding and put a big smile on my face.:coffeescreen:

Sam:icon_cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,133 Posts
After my double knee replacement surgery I bought a Honda Silverwing 600. I rode it exclusively for 3 years and put just short of 15,000 miles on it before trading it in on a motorcycle. Never had a single issue with it in those miles. I replaced a few tires, did the oil changes, and that's about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
Something like 95% of ALL scooters in the world, and virtually ALL 50cc & 150cc scooters are made in the same two factories in China, no matter who's name is on them. The only difference is in the specs the distributers require. They all use the Honda GY6 engine. That includes Honda, Suzuki, and Yamaha (in the 50cc & 150cc sizes.) The only difference in the Chinese "brands" is the bodywork.Go to ScootDawg.com. They have a downloadable guide to setting them up yourself--- the same things a decent dealer is supposed to do. Most scooter shops don't do the prep. The difference in reliability is set-up. When you get one new, you have to remove the bodywork, replace the fuel lines, and seal all the electrical connections, among other things. I had to drain oil out of the carb and cylinder on mine--- I think they dipped it like a sheep! The Chinese scooters are the most prevalent vehicles in the world. Yeah, you see a lot of them broken down, but they sell literally MILLIONS of them. It's similar to the HD's perceived reliability effect: most break downs on the road are HDs in this country; most BIKES are HDs in this country. I got my wife one in a crate several years ago, and did the prep myself. Zero issues. She rode it a couple of summers, then quit riding, so we're going to donate it to the local PBS radio station. My only complaint is the gel cell batteries cost $110 a pop.
 
1 - 20 of 72 Posts
Top