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How do i get corrosion from a bike in a sandy place (Florida) out of the chrome? Also the paint coating on the tank, not the paint but the finish? (I know, im that much of a noob) How to I repair that? The finish is dried and flaky and looks like it can be lightly sanded off and then refinished.

I tried a search on this topic and it came up with 0 results. Sorry if its redundant.

-Vixxen
 

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It would depend on whether its real chrome or chrome plated. You could try sanding down an area that's not to noticeable and see if it helps, but I have doubts it will work. If you have the dough, and you can get the parts off, they can be proffessionally dipped, but it will cost a pretty penny.

I swear by Mother's Chrome Polish. May not help the corrosion parts, but will shine up the rest really good. In between waxings, a wipe of a cloth shines it back up.
 

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Chrome: Any chrome polish will do. But if the corrosion has eaten through the chrome plating, then the polish will remove the corrosion and expose plain old metal...then it's pay big bucks to have it re-chromed or sand/prime/paint time.

Paint: Dried and flaky...would help to see a picture...but if you want a nice shiny tank, then it sounds like it will need to be thoroughly sanded ( smoothed with body filler and spot putty) then primed and painted.

If you have no experience at body work and painting, then it would be best to find a professional or it will end up looking pretty bad and won't last. It sounds easy to sand it and buy a can of spray paint, but it's much harder than it sounds to get a beautiful finish people will admire rather than laugh at...
 

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Your corrosion isn't from being in a sandy place, it's from the moisture in the air. Especially the salty air in Florida. Corrosion, or rust, is common anywhere salt is used on roads or near oceans.

You very probably have corroded/rusted parts all over the bike. If a particular area is the only one affected, it probably had a starting point like scratches, or some injury to the paint or surface chrome. These points cannot be cured by only treating the surface, but have to be taken down to the bare metal and be re-done completely.

One of the best things for any metal vehicle is to be rinsed after being outside and then stored inside. Leave it out near an ocean and you will get rust.

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A better way to unstick an engine?

I took a day off just to ride with my wife's 2nd cousin,back from his final tour overseas. He showed me his shop taken from a comer in the barn,and some cool ideas on cheap heat and re-purposed items from the trash bin at his work.
He had a 250 old school Triumph that was frozen and we talked about how he got it to become un-stuck. Left outside,the rusty water line was halfway up the engine case covers. Instead of soaking and then pounding it apart,he used an aquarium pump and pumped his witches brew of tranny fluid and solvents through the bike with an aquarium pump. The dirty fluid was captured,filtered,and pumped in a continuous loop until it ran clear. Of course,he changed it for new a few times to keep the solvents active.
He was eventually able to turn the engine without pulling the jugs or anything else. When he gets to the project later,he is starting from a much better place and a much cleaner engine.
 
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