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Discussion Starter #1
Have a friend wanting to sell me this bike as a starter bike. Did the basic course and had my endorsement however never been on a road before. Im 6.2 and 275 pounds and really concerned about buying something that big as a beginners bike.
 

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American Legion Rider
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^^^^ What he said.
 

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^^^^ ditto X 2

It would be a huge mistake (pun intended) to try to learn motorcycling on a massive bike like that. If you're lucky you'll only frustrate yourself trying to learn on such a large ungainly machine. If you're unlucky, well,, let's not go there..
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the answers thats what I thought I think maybe a vstar 950 vulcan 900 on vstar 1100 max for a guy my size... What do you guys think about these ?
 

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Troublemaker
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Those would be perfect choices. As much as it pains me, I hate thinking I need to move up in size and spend more money in a year, but it is the right thing to do. Do yourself a favor though, get a bike that is fuel injected like the Vulcan 900, it is a lot less work should there be a carb problem, not a lot of people that still know how to work on them right unless they work on their own.

The 1900 is a nice bike and a great engine, and if you are serious about riding a lot and learning at a snails pace, you may be okay with it if you paid a lot of attention in the BRC.
 

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One of the problems with beginners buying big bikes is that much of the riding experience (especially low speed riding) will not be as enjoyable as it would be on a lighter, smaller bike.

You may start to dread riding (or at least not enjoy it as much as you should) and that will result in you not riding that much. Then the bike will just sit, and you will find other things to do with your free time. The bike sitting will become unreliable and ANOTHER bike becomes a garage queen for years and years, eventually to be sold off for a fraction of the original investment.

Lots of very low mileage 15-20 year old Harley's out there, because of exactly this.
 

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American Legion Rider
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Yep, all good words. It's rather easy to ride in a straight line. The challenge is low speed parking lot type riding. And there is more of that than you might think.
 

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You can buy a 15-20 year old Harley with low miles for a fraction of it's original cost? Where??

:coffeescreen:
Might depend on what someone would call low mileage. I consider the 38k I have right now on mine low mileage but that amount is high mileage to most.;)
 

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One of the problems with beginners buying big bikes is that much of the riding experience (especially low speed riding) will not be as enjoyable as it would be on a lighter, smaller bike.

You may start to dread riding (or at least not enjoy it as much as you should) and that will result in you not riding that much. Then the bike will just sit, and you will find other things to do with your free time. The bike sitting will become unreliable and ANOTHER bike becomes a garage queen for years and years, eventually to be sold off for a fraction of the original investment.

Lots of very low mileage 15-20 year old Harley's out there, because of exactly this.
I really agree with this. I'm not a big (or strong) guy 5'10" around 160# and started out on a 750 Shadow. At over 500# it's way to heavy for my skill level.

I new I had to get out and practice, but after dropping it twice in the driveway, I was terrified of it. If it wasn't for the fact that I did a straight across trade with a Jeep that wasn't drivable I would have been out money on something I'm not comfortable with yet.

Sent from my HUAWEI H892L using Tapatalk
 

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American Legion Rider
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Heck my 1985 Electra Glide with 66k still hadn't had a rebuild. The evolution engine was the beginning of Harleys coming into the age of engines lasting as far as I'm concerned. Maybe it's just whether or not you change filter and oil on time and not change them for MORE POWER.
 

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Troublemaker
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Why would you want something you can't modify and keep reliable? I love changing things to make my bike different than every other one that comes off the showroom floor, and that includes upgrades to the electronics and the engine.

That said, if you are happy with what you ride, it's you that is all that matters. Just get your ass out and ride, especially living in Texas that has some great all year round riding. Get that odometer to add a 1 to the front!
 

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Gone.
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You can change them to up the power AND keep them reliable. It's just that many people don't have the knowledge or solid advice on how or what to do. They read a few magazine articles, talk to their buddies, read a few webpages, and all of a sudden they're ordering cams and pipes and what-not, and they really have no idea what they're doing.
 

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That's what I was getting at really.
 
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