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Discussion Starter #1
For all new riders....Please be very cautious when riding in areas where the road is being paved. The uneven road and groves in the road before it's paved is extremely dangerous. The grooves will definatley become a hazard. I'm sure we all have experiened this or will at some point.
 

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We have a bridge that is being redone. It can't be avoided if I need to go to Joe's house. Go across in second gear. If there's cars behind me, I'll pull over before the bridge to let them go across first so I can take my dear sweet time. I try to zig zag a bit to not get caught in the grooves. Put what ticks me off is when that little rock kicks up and hits the bike.....
 

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Grooved pavement can cause reduced traction. It's not too difficult to travel over as long as you relax the elbows and keep the speed to a sane level. A death grip on the handlebars will make the ride more uncomfortable.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Zippy, you are so right. Those little pebbles can do damage to the bike, Knees, ankles and hands.....

Dog, I am definately guilty of the 'deathgrip'.....
 

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The secret to riding over grooves or steel grate bridges is to relax and let the tires wander around a bit. Fighting the motorcycle only wears you out.
 

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Commute Racer
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I was expecting a link to Captain Crash's YouTube page when I clicked here, thinking someone had just discovered it (or got the forwarded email from grandma).
 

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Pegasus trapped in a human body on a motorcycle
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I see no vids from him dealing with road construction. Bummer, cause I would think this is a topic that he would have done.

What gets me is how so many people around here (the city of Waterville) complain about how horrid the roads are. Then, when they do fix the roads, they piss and crotchbleed about the fact that they now have to deal with the road construction goin on.

Sorry to all the complainers where I live, but you HAVE to make a choice! Do you want the roads fixed or not? (Personally, I would rather have them fixed. Beats on the suspension of my truck and bike less that way)

To all new riders experiencing construction, take it easy, be observant, and relax and trust your bike to get you through safely.
 

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Commute Racer
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A rider in my area recently died from changing lanes from the scraped off pavement up onto fresh pavement. He lost control of the bike, and was run over by a truck.
 

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The BIGGEST danger is riding on uneven surfaces, where you need to move from a lower level to a higher level, i.e., where the "new" road surface is an inch or more higher than the yet to be replaced part of the road. If you move to the outside of the lane and then sharply cut over to the new area, crossing where the two lanes meet at as close to a 90 degree angle as possible, you will be fine. If you try to "slide" over, your front tire can get caught against the wall of the higher side and then you will go down. You will be unable to steer the bike right or left and you will crash to the ground. Try your best not to get caught in this type situation.

It can be tempting to want to move from a grooved surface that is difficult and noisy to ride on, over to the newly repaved surface. But if you are traveling at speed it is harder to cut the angle properly so that your front wheel bumps up onto the higher finished surface area. If you can, just put up with a longer ride on the grooved pavement until you are past the road work area. This will put you at far less risk than trying to move over onto the newer and higher surface.

Note that there is much less chance of a problem going from a higher surface to a lower surface, but even there if you try to slide over gently you risk getting your front tire caught against the "wall" of the higher surface. Make the movement sharp instead of gradual.
 

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I don't like the big, flat metal plates they use to temporarily cover holes and trenches. Especially if they're laid at an oblique angle to traffic or if they're wet. The get very slick when wet.
 

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We have a bridge that is being redone. It can't be avoided if I need to go to Joe's house. Go across in second gear. If there's cars behind me, I'll pull over before the bridge to let them go across first so I can take my dear sweet time. I try to zig zag a bit to not get caught in the grooves. Put what ticks me off is when that little rock kicks up and hits the bike.....
Well done Zippy. There is no reason to expect a typical cager to respect what you are going though. That means they will also not understand why you are riding the way you are. Let them go by and then ride the way the road demands sounds just right to me. I often take that approach when I run into road conditions that I don't like. Most cagers have no concept of what we bikers face on day to day obstacles.
 

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I guess there are varying degrees of bad road surface when the road is torn up, but I try to be consistent in my speed -- there have been some surfaces that made me as uncomfortable going too slow as it did going too fast. When you are on the surface for a while, you know when you reach that "sweet spot" for speed.
 

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these types of roads are one of the reasons I like the wider tire on the front of my bike, they have a larger footprint and ride over some of the bad stuff a little better than the narrow tires do
 

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One of the roads I used to learn on was repaved three times this year. After the first time they paved it with recycled asphalt, it was nice and smooth, made for easy riding. One morning I set out on my first out of town ride. I had spent most of the day away, but not all on MC. When I went to go home that evening, they had laid down gravel on the road. They had not one sign up stating loose gravel. I had just started my MC riding. I hit that gravel, got scared a bit, remembered not to touch the front brake, slowed down with the back brake. I turned that bike around and got home another way. I did not have the skill at the time to get over a mile and 1/2 stretch of gravel. There's a few good twisties on this road. I called the town the next morning and gave them hell about not putting up signs. Turns out that it was a really hot summer day and the oil rose up on the roadway turning the new pavement into a skating rink. They laid down the gravel to soak up the oil. They had to do this twice. I avoided this road as much as possible until all the gravel worked into the tar. Then last week, I was driving down it again and they where digging up squares of pavement everywhere, leaving large gaps in the road. If I had hit one of those I swear I would have broke my forks. Once again, the swerving lessons came into play and I had to dodge the squares. I guess it is going to be a good learning road!!!
 

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This road still makes me nervous. You can tell where the cars drive, cause where the tires are the most, it's smooth as a babies butt. It feels to me like my tires just don't grip right on these areas. If I try to ride between the tire lines, I risk hitting the oily spots left behind by cagers. If I ride on the right hand side of the tire mark, you still hit a bit of lose gravel. I just tend to take it easy on this road.
 

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it's always amazed me the "advances" they have made in road construction....several roads around me have been here pretty much untouched (except for a little re-taring every few years) and hold up well...then there are the "new" roads they have put in or replaced the older surface with....you know, the one they have to fix every 6-8 months, have large grooves in them from traffic, start falling apart so soon....

nothing wrong with the 30 year old roads, but hey, we need new ones that last less time and cost more money in maintenance because some a**hat on the city council has a relative that has a road paving company
 

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it's always amazed me the "advances" they have made in road construction....several roads around me have been here pretty much untouched (except for a little re-taring every few years) and hold up well...then there are the "new" roads they have put in or replaced the older surface with....you know, the one they have to fix every 6-8 months, have large grooves in them from traffic, start falling apart so soon....

nothing wrong with the 30 year old roads, but hey, we need new ones that last less time and cost more money in maintenance because some a**hat on the city council has a relative that has a road paving company
A couple weeks ago we rode down a part of the original route 66 in Oklahoma that they swore hasn't been re-paved since at least 1937. Some of it was as smooth and usable as anything you'd find today, which was amazing. (Some of it didn't survive all that well.) I was thinking, "Why can't they make a roads like this, today?"
 

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A couple weeks ago we rode down a part of the original route 66 in Oklahoma that they swore hasn't been re-paved since at least 1937. Some of it was as smooth and usable as anything you'd find today, which was amazing. (Some of it didn't survive all that well.) I was thinking, "Why can't they make a roads like this, today?"
Planned Obsolescence; something our whole economy is based on. Not a new concept. Don't build it too good.
 

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I've been over quite a bit of the chewed up roads, steel sheets, painted roads, huge man hole type covers, sandy roads, rocky roads, etc. but, the above picture of Mackinac Bridge will show you what I consider to be one of the worst. Been over it a few times now and it still makes me nervous.
 
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