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Troublemaker
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Discussion Starter #1
Harvest is on the roll here and the farmers in my area don't see anything but getting the crops to the elevators. They will pull out in front of cars and motorcycles and not care, so be aware that they are starting fires, dust, and their subsidies are getting on the books for vacation time and new Caddys for the wives!
 

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Thanks for the reminder! I love to ride the back roads, so I see these pretty often.

Harvest is on the roll here and the farmers in my area don't see anything but getting the crops to the elevators. They will pull out in front of cars and motorcycles and not care, so be aware that they are starting fires, dust, and their subsidies are getting on the books for vacation time and new Caddys for the wives!
 

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And watch out at twilight! A combine coming out of the field will be probably covered with dust and, if they don't clean off their tail lights, they can be almost invisible from behind!
 

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Troublemaker
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Discussion Starter #4
And watch out at twilight! A combine coming out of the field will be probably covered with dust and, if they don't clean off their tail lights, they can be almost invisible from behind!
And by that time, they are probably well on their way to being drunk. Some even drive the combine to the bar here.
 

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American Legion Rider
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And by that time, they are probably well on their way to being drunk. Some even drive the combine to the bar here.
Really! Farmers must have changed. Both my grand parents were farmers. One never touched a thing while the other had one beer a day per doctors orders after a stroke. Never did understand that unless it was to try getting weight back on him. I'd be surprised if he was even 115 pounds soaking wet.

Now I would not be surprised if it was farm hands hitting the bars like that. But the real farmer, that sorta surprises me.
 

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At east now, I can see a mile in every direction since the crops are gone.:)

With the land left barren, I can at least see the Dozens of Deer right next to the road, stray BEEVES and the hundreds of big fat Turkeys too!

I do fear the time change though and driving/ riding home from work in the dark because as was mentioned, some of the older farm stuff doesn't have lights!

BUBBA, the main life form in this part of the country, seems to wait until it is absolutely dark before turning on their headlights---probably feel like they are saving the life cycle of their headlight BUBS as they call them.:biggrin:

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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Veteran Member
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Farmers in Nebraska are very different from those in Wisconsin, it would seem. Here they are courteous enough on the roads, most wave as I pass. If they have wide equipment they'll move over or stop to give others room to pass safely. And around here they don't have time to go to the bar when they're in the fields or barns from 4am to 10pm, 7 days a week. If they're a bit sloppy on the roads it's likely that they are just exhausted, not drunk.
 

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Troublemaker
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Discussion Starter #8
Oh, they wave here too, as they are running you off the road! They have hit school busses while blowing stop signs with their semis, head on collisions because they are using the whole road and not just their lane, and blocking highways to unload their combines. They don't care here, and it's all in the name of ethanol. There is no food grown here, all government subsidy crops.

And yes, they are always drinking and tossing cans and bottles out on the highway.
 

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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And yes, they are always drinking and tossing cans and bottles out on the highway.
Reminds me of a cropduster that used to drink while he was spraying crops. His mechanic said he flew better after a few beers. When it came time for annual inspection, they'd clean out a garbage can full of empties out of the belly of the plane.

The pilot never had an accident, is now retired and a wealthy man... go figure!
 

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Shaper Of All Things Metal
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I'm wanting to stick up for Nebraska farmers and always hesitate to paint with a broad brush, but I'm afraid Luvs2Play is pretty much dead on with his assessment. No matter what ag season it is, fertilizing, planting or harvest, they automatically assume the right of way and will run you over to prove the point or at the very least intimidate you.

I'm with Porky on liking the increased visibility with the crops out. Most blind intersections are gone after harvest.
 

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Troublemaker
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Discussion Starter #11
Reminds me of a cropduster that used to drink while he was spraying crops. His mechanic said he flew better after a few beers. When it came time for annual inspection, they'd clean out a garbage can full of empties out of the belly of the plane.

The pilot never had an accident, is now retired and a wealthy man... go figure!
And to think my dad retired as a crop duster with 41 years. He would have one Martini with his dinner at night, and not one drop any other time. I know who you are talking about too. They were friends. Dad always had his annuals done at the same place.

I don't hate farmers, even though I know how they are when the money is almost in their pocket, but they really do have tunnel vision when it comes to their livelihood. I hope they make a lot of money, but I wish they would quit paying $15 to $20K per acre for farm ground. They will not make it back in their lifetime and it makes my taxes go up artifically since I live in the country. The 240 acres across the road from me went for $15K an acre and it has a creek running through it. In order to get one more row in the corn field, they started busting up my shelter belt too. That is going to cost them if they do it again next year, it is still on my property and they know they did wrong, but don't care. They ripped out the property stakes two years ago, I had to have it surveyed again, this time it is logged with the county.
 

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I can completely understand your frustration. I just hate to see individual people generalized into one large group. There is another group of people all of us in this forum know that often get lumped together as jerks or whatever because of how some of them are. ;)
 

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Charlie Tango Xray
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They don't bother me. If one pulls in front of me, I go around them. I know what its like to work long hours, with limited sleep, and a small window of opportunity to get a job finished. So I might have a little extra empathy. Besides, isn't moving into farm country and complaining about farm equipment, the same as moving near an airport and whining about the planes?
On another note, I love sleeping with the windows cracked open, listening to the sound of the harvester's hydro drive working the fields near our house. Theres something relaxing about it. But if they ever put a loud exhaust on that thing and start reving the engine at the end of every pass.......:p
 

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Troublemaker
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Discussion Starter #15
They don't bother me. If one pulls in front of me, I go around them. I know what its like to work long hours, with limited sleep, and a small window of opportunity to get a job finished. So I might have a little extra empathy. Besides, isn't moving into farm country and complaining about farm equipment, the same as moving near an airport and whining about the planes?
On another note, I love sleeping with the windows cracked open, listening to the sound of the harvester's hydro drive working the fields near our house. Theres something relaxing about it. But if they ever put a loud exhaust on that thing and start reving the engine at the end of every pass.......:p
So, you don't mind when tired people are driving on the roads and not paying attention to you? Them being in the fields doesn't bother anyone, killing kids in school busses does. Or killing people waiting for a train to cross, forgot to look up while he was texting, took the top end of a guy right off along with the cab of his pickup.

They work hard for a few weeks a year, it's what they elect to do for a living. That is great, nobody has a problem with that, but driving tired is no different than driving drunk, except that most drunks at least have their eyes open. We can't open our windows here at night, so there is no way to hear them in the fields, the dust is so thick that sometimes there are wrecks on the highway because of it. At least now they did make them liable for causing accidents because of visibility.

I'm all for the farmers, said it before, but at the very least, they could have respect for others on the roads. Here, they don't give you time to just go around them all the time, usually they will look at you and still pull right out in front of you, and living on a highway means that there is usually traffic to keep you from just going wherever you want.
 

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Charlie Tango Xray
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I'm seeing a different breed of farmer than you. The ones around here are polite hard working people. If the road is narrow, they pull off the road to let traffic pass. And they try to move equipment when the traffic is light. I'm on the county board and I don't think I've heard about any major accidents caused by farm equipment around here in the last 20 years. But if someone purposely tried to hit you with a large machine, have them arrested.
Most farmers have multiple jobs though out the year. The guy that leases part of my land for corn, also runs a construction business. He excavated, installed the septic, poured the cement and put up my pole building/shop. But like with everything from bikers to forum posters, the bad ones are the only ones that ever get noticed.
 

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Troublemaker
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Discussion Starter #17
Your farmers are definitely a different breed. Farming here isn't a sideline, it's a business. Most of them farm thousands of acres, not a couple hundred.

They drive semis and have fleets of them, a lot of them have no license for it and the only time they even have them safety checked is if the State Patrol stops them. The truck yard here is full of impounded semis, they just go buy another one and hope they don't get stopped again. It was a 17 year old driving a semi grain truck that broadsided a school bus, He had days of experience driving and blew through a stop sign. They don't worry about tires, if it starts to shred, they just speed up and get it to throw off, don't care if it kills someone, just get it off.

They don't cover their loads either, there is corn and beans everywhere, and when you get sandblasted with it, the paint leaves, the windshield gets busted and it really hurts when you are on the bike. They don't take the 15 seconds it takes to roll the cover over it because that takes time at the elevator, and they want to get there before their neighbor does so they don't have to wait.

I have worked for them all of my life, like I said somewhere else, my father was a farmer/crop sprayer for 41 years. Only difference was we didn't have the monster equipment and tractor trailer rigs. We didn't have an air conditioned cab until after I got out of the Army, but then I only got to play when I came back up from Kansas on vacation.
 

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American Legion Rider
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One of the differences I've notice from California farmers and those in the mid-west, is where they farm in relation to the roads. Out there you can get a 16 wheeler the long way parked between the road and the crops. Here you are lucky if you can get a pickup parked between the road and the crop. I've seen crops completely covering stop signs even. Guess that extra few bushels of corn, wheat or soybeans is worth more than human lives. Well, that's my observation on it anyway.
 

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Charlie Tango Xray
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Yesterday was probably one of the last beautiful days to ride around here. High 70s, not a cloud in the sky. Everyone and their brothers were out riding. Even the HD guys were waving.:p Every pit stop was packed. We did hear some complaining about being inconvenienced by the farmers moving equipment on a Sunday. "Couldn't they take just one day off so we could ride?" :mad:
At the same time, they were loosening their belts and stuffing their faces with huge greezy cheeseburgers with fries on the side. Made from cattle and spuds raised by farmers. Cattle fed on crops raised by farmers. Quite possibly one of the farmers that inconvenienced them on their ride into town. And don't get me started about where hops and barley comes from. This is America, and we Americans gotta eat. But if you really want to hit the farmers where it hurts.... Stop eating.:p
I bet they'd prefer to be out riding on a Sunday too.;)
:71baldboy:
 

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Veteran Member
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Farming in WI is also business, with the proliferation of corporate farms killing off the family farms. But up here even the corporate farm employees are pretty good people. With some exceptions, obviously, like you find in any profession or group of people. If Nebraska farmers really are all jerks, maybe it's just the difference in people between the two states? :p
 
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