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Moderator - Like a crazy cat lady but with bikes!
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60486

A good friend and now future riding buddy is a trike nut. He's been into them forever and now he's finally achieving his dream of owning them.

A few weekends ago he found himself a few states over for some sporting event in Ohio. He decided to check out the oldest Harley dealership in the nation and well, he didn't leave empty handed! This is an amazing Freewheeler with only a thousand miles on the odometer. The previous owner got it wanting to try out trikes, didn't ride it a lot, figured out he didn't like trikes, then sold it. My friend got a new Harley for a steep discount.

Of course I had to ride it! Trikes are definitely a different kind of jam. You don't lean, you turn the bars almost like you would a steering wheel, and everything about balancing just...goes out the window. I see the appeal in these. You can ride them in rougher weather, you can experience a motorcycling experience without having to be in the tip top shape required to be on a two wheeler. It's amazing to be able to ride on ice with street tires without the worry of breaking traction and falling off. You can seemingly spend more time taking in the sights on one of these.

60487


I will say that trikes aren't really my jam (I could definitely roll with a sidecar though) but I most certainly get their appeal. More, I now get the appeal of the bar and shield. This bike is so brand new it smells like it just rolled off the factory floor. And yet, when you're behind the bars it feels like you're behind something vintage. This is a bike that has a key fob, digital odometer, even a reverser! And yet, with that v-twin rumbling between your legs and the classic style, it may as well be a time machine. Even the vibration, that rumble, and that exhaust note (in this case coming from a set of Vance & Hines pipes). I'm beginning to get why folks love Harley-Davidson so much. Thus far, my friend only plans on removing the windscreen. Like me, he likes his bikes naked, even if that means they aren't as fun in rougher weather. :)

I hope to get some more seat time on this monster and flirt some more with trikes. I want to see how a reverse trike like a Can-Am would compare. I'm making a habit of trying out oddball bikes first. I also definitely want to take a ride on a two wheeled ICE Harley...though I fear I may not be able to leave the dealership without it following me home. :D

Likewise, with a little luck I may end up spending a lot of my riding season riding and reviewing bikes from various manufacturers. Only time will tell!
 

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Nightfly
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I understand the love and like of a three-wheeler. And if you're going to buy one, Harley is the only one to own. Oh I know the Honda crowd will disagree and that's fine, but Harley is the only company that actually builds their own.

I'm glad you've found appreciation of the Big V-twin you were straddling, nothing like it. Three wheel riding is definitely different than 2 wheel and takes some getting used to. Me, I would never want a side-car but it may be something you'll gravitate towards..

Don't always believe what your eyes are telling you, that Harley you see with your eyes often will show many limitations. I find too many people love to put Harley down because that's what non-Harley riders are told. Try looking with your understanding and then you'll know how to fly.
 

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Ace Tuner
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I've ridden Honda trikes, can't see me ever owning one. Nothing against a trike or Honda or Harley either for that matter but it's just not me.
A friend and business competitor owns a Can-Am dealership and was offering demo rides one Saturday.
Kinda wish I would have gone for a ride just to see what it was like but people were waiting to ride and some of them were probably going to buy and I knew I wasn't so I didn't want to waist their time.
Maybe next time I'll ride one anyway.

S F
 

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Before I bought my Goldwing I tried a Harley trike and a Can-Am. I found I just didn't care for the experience of a three wheeler. It is very, very different from the feel of riding a motorcycle. Unless I slowed down on turns to a really slow speed I felt like the vehicle was trying to throw me off, since it does not lean. Maybe someday, I thought, when I get too old or frail to hold up a heavy motorcycle when coming to a stop, or when getting it up off of the side stand is just too much for me, then I would consider a trike. But I have since decided that when that time comes (right now at 76 I am still very comfortable handling my 900+ pound 2016 Goldwing motorcycle) I will just buy a MUCH lighter bike, like a sub 400 pound Triumph or Enfield standard, or get an also lighter highway capable scooter (I own a 150cc scooter right now that when I am honest, will admit that sometimes it is more fun to ride than riding a real motorcycle, but at that engine size is not capable of going over about 62 mph). I figure a lightweight motorcycle or scooter will be my fun vehicle after the Goldwing, and maybe up to about age 90. After that I might have to consider a trike or a Miata if I am still on the green side of the grass.
 

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Same with me, not really into trikes, although that one looks sharp. I've ever owned a sidecar unit, but would love to have one.
 

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I think a sidecar could be fun, but only for low speed riding and very, very slow turns. Turning left requires a real effort, and turning right risks having the outside wheel lifting off the road. I guess if I could afford having a garage full of "bikes", one might be a Ural, but never as my primary ride.
 

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Before I bought my Goldwing I tried a Harley trike and a Can-Am. I found I just didn't care for the experience of a three wheeler. It is very, very different from the feel of riding a motorcycle.
Well you got me @vito by a couple years, but I'm with you on this. You couldn't give me a Harley of any kind or any kind of 3-wheeler, and if you did I wouldn't ride it I would sell it. Don't get me wrong I love Harley's, they just aren't for me. I really like the way some of the older Harley's sit there and idle, 'potato...potato...potato...potato' so slow they sound like they are going to stall out, something like an old diesel tractor!

What I do like about a trike is the riders. Last weekend at a Kawasaki Good Times Demo Tour, I was there trying out some of their bikes, and 2 old gals were at the dealer to try out a Slingshot. Turns out they were partners and had a Harley trike. They didn't like the Slingshot so much but really loved their trike. They were members of a local trike club and road it all over the southwest. That is what I love about trikes, folks who like them are having fun on the open road. So the trike isn't for me, but for some folks the trike is what they need to stay connected and enjoy the wind in their face and if it keeps them going I love that they love it. One thing we all still have in common, we have so far all avoided the rocking chair!!
 

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American Legion Rider
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I think you'll be surprised about a sidecar as well. Both trike and sidecar require completely different techniques. Forget everything you know about leaning and learn to drive them not necessarily ride them. You drive them around corners. Although the sidecar is better in one direction more than the other depend on which side you mount the thing. Has everyone forgot about soupy? Here was an avid rider until he decided to go with a sidecar. When was the last time you saw him here. We all could have learned from him but he just faded away. And it was obvious he was having trouble with the sidecar experience. Or at least it appeared so.

You do have other options. There is a 3 wheel bike that leans but now you have to swallow your pride about the looks of the bike. But you can continue to ride and lean. Or there is a conversion you can add to your bike to make a 3 wheel leaner. Oh, then there are the Landing Gear options. Where a set of almost training wheel like extensions drop down under a set speed. But again you'll have to swallow your pride about the looks. The easy solution is to just hang up your spurs so to speak, just stop riding. Any other solution requires a lot more than you might be willing to give. But it can be done.

I'm honestly not sure which way I'll go. There is already Spyder just waiting for me to get on it and go, sitting in my garage already. But I'm still fighting the need to do it. We all will face it at some point. Sometimes I look back and almost wish I hadn't started riding again after my accident. But I've got almost 8 more years of riding by doing so. Although now I'm facing this decision with the rest of you. There just isn't a really great solution that works extremely easy. Something has to give in all of them.
 

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For a few years I thought the Landing Gear modification was the perfect solution for when I start having problems feeling confident that I can stop the bike without tipping over, but I have never been able to verify how well this system actually works, i.e., how reliable and how well it would function on the camber of a road. In fact, on all the forums that I participate in, and have posed the question, I have yet to see a single response by someone that actually added the Landing Gear system. Going to a lower weight bike certainly seems a better solution than giving up riding totally, as does going to a scooter. I have so much fun on my Honda PCX 150 that sometimes I prefer taking that out for a ride over taking my bells-and-whistles Goldwing. I think that a similar scooter, like the Forza, with 300 cc and the ability to maintain highway speeds, and weighs a fraction of what a "real" motorcycle weighs, is another good alternative. And doing this would keep me on two wheels. Using the maneuverability of two wheels, leaning into turns, etc. is part of the allure of riding, all of which would be lost on the CanAm or a trike. Sure, a trike sort of looks like a motorcycle, but it is something that you drive rather than ride. My ego can handle riding a scooter or a small motorcycle. In any event, I am hoping that these choices are still at least a few years away for me.
 

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Don't ever let it get back to my wife, but she has ridden Spyders so long now that she can out corner me on some of the backroad twisties around here. And she could do it without worrying one bit about it. I have to get my game on sometimes to get her off my tail which I can still do but I have to work at it. I've heard others say similar about Spyders. You don't just fall into it though. She's worked hard getting there and we've added several aftermarket suspension goodies but I really think if she wanted to and could bring her game up just a tad, she could take me. Some of that is me slowing down too but a person can make these things get up and move. I hear what you are saying about scooters too vito. I forget that that's an option too. I think Porky would agree with you.
 

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Moderator - Like a crazy cat lady but with bikes!
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Discussion Starter #12
@Miss Mercedes your discription sounds like a perfectly written ad!
That is a nice looking trike.
I wouldn't mind having one, sadly it's not in my budget.
Awe thank you! :)

That's me getting a bit into my writer mood. Amusingly enough, I can be awfully clumsy in speech, but you'd never know in print! :D

I understand the love and like of a three-wheeler. And if you're going to buy one, Harley is the only one to own. Oh I know the Honda crowd will disagree and that's fine, but Harley is the only company that actually builds their own.

I'm glad you've found appreciation of the Big V-twin you were straddling, nothing like it. Three wheel riding is definitely different than 2 wheel and takes some getting used to. Me, I would never want a side-car but it may be something you'll gravitate towards..

Don't always believe what your eyes are telling you, that Harley you see with your eyes often will show many limitations. I find too many people love to put Harley down because that's what non-Harley riders are told. Try looking with your understanding and then you'll know how to fly.
This is why I intentionally seek out as many experiences as possible. Who knows what you'll find when you ignore the clouds of complaints and try something for yourself! :) Does this trike have the best performance numbers or the most powerful engine? Nah. But it had a sort of magic to it that I can't quite put my finger on. And the pipes, the pipes bring out a hooligan in me. It's a delight hearing the v-twin note bounce off buildings as you roll by.

slowed down on turns to a really slow speed I felt like the vehicle was trying to throw me off, since it does not lean. Maybe someday, I thought, when I get too old or frail to hold up a heavy motorcycle when coming to a stop, or when getting it up off of the side stand is just too much for me, then I would consider a trike. But I have since decided that when that time comes (right now at 76 I am still very comfortable handling my 900+ pound 2016 Goldwing motorcycle) I will just buy a MUCH lighter bike, like a sub 400 pound Triumph or Enfield standard, or get an also lighter highway capable scooter (I own a 150cc scooter right now that when I am honest, will admit that sometimes it is more fun to ride than riding a real motorcycle, but at that engine size is not capable of going over about 62 mph).
That's the main reason I couldn't really get into this particular machine. I've ridden old offroad three wheelers in the past and turning the trike induces the same "oh this is about to tip" uneasy feeling. I'm sure it's really planted, but even after more seat time on this thing I've not been able to get past that feeling. I'd be interested in seeing if such feeling is psychological and thus seeing two wheels in front (Can-Am) eases that.

I've thus far only sat on a Can-Am. It feels like straddling a snowmobile or a jetski. It does seem Bombardier is fond of that "not really a motorcycle" feel they gave those machines.

And there's nothing wrong with digging scooters! If I had any winter beater scooters running I'd be rolling on one every single day. They're light, agile, and fun to wring out just to reach the speed limit. :)

If I'm successful in my venture getting into motorcycle reviewing, one of the first I want to shoot for is a Ural. They look absolutely killer and I'd be interested in seeing how they perform offroad.
 

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Nightfly
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We all know Harley does not have the best performance numbers, and that is what I hear all the time by the crowd that base their only condition of owning a bike on just a few criteria. Is it the fastest quickest most powerful bike on the market. The intrinsic value of what other bikes offer seems to be of no importance. Thank god we don't all like the same thing, how boring that would be. But truth sometimes escapes the well-intended. Harley's leak oil, they break down all the time, they don't have longevity. All the crap thrown at them seems to have one thing in common, if you really research Harley, or any bike that has been so accused, you just might learn something. All motorcycles have improved in quality, and those that do not, are no longer around, or on their way out the door. I respect everyone's choice in what they ride, but I don't respect those who are stuck in non-truths.

As the old expression goes, "sometimes it's best to keep mouth closed and thought the fool, then to open it and remove all doubt." I like how you think MM, you're right on the money.
 
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