Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So I have an 84' kawasaki gpz 550 that Im working on getting it back on the road. A friend of mine helped me today to get the 2 tires off the bike(he took them back to his place to remove the tire from rim) and he said I should look into getting new brake discs. I looked up and found out they are about 100 a piece around. So I have been reading around and found many contradictory stories about resurfacing, some say that there should be absolutely no reason to have to replace brake rotors, others say they can't because they are made of stainless steel.

An ideal situation, I would just get new rotors but that is quite a bit to shell out on rotors. So can you just bring over the discs to a mechanic that resurfaces rotors and it'll be all fine and dandy?

Also, what is the effect of not doing anything to the rotors. When you run your finger perpendicular to direction of spin, you can feel groves within the rotors.

This bike only has 20,000 miles on it as well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,003 Posts
If you can feel the grooves, there probably a big chance they aren't going to be able to be turned. Discs on bikes are thinner than on cars, so there's less that can be machined. If you just put pads on, you'll eat right through the pads in no time and end up spending more money the next time. 20,000 miles, you've gotten your money's worth out of those rotors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
57 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
If you can feel the grooves, there probably a big chance they aren't going to be able to be turned. Discs on bikes are thinner than on cars, so there's less that can be machined. If you just put pads on, you'll eat right through the pads in no time and end up spending more money the next time. 20,000 miles, you've gotten your money's worth out of those rotors.
Thanks for the info, looks like theres no way to cheap out this time :frown:
 

·
Gone.
Joined
·
17,857 Posts
Also, they should have a minimum thickness stamped on them. You could safely turn them down as long as the final result isn't thinner then that minimum thickness. The problem is that on most rotors you don't have very much extra thickness to work with.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top