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Vintage Rider
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Discussion Starter #1
Since I finally got my post count up enough to post pictures, I thought I'd go ahead and post a restoration thread on one of my projects. Guess then we'll see if this forum is interested in build types of threads and original restorations. As an avid collector of vintage Japanese bikes from the '60s up to '75, original restorations is the only kind I do.

This was my third build of last summer, and I was starting to run out of ambition. Probably just normal for my old age. My goal last summer was to start redoing the bikes I had with non oem paint colors or schemes. This little 1964 Sport 50 Honda was another bad color choice by the PO, but since the rest of it was nearly complete and rust free, I went ahead and bought it a few years ago anyway.

Here's what it looked like the day I bought it.


Having found out that the bike was originally white during dis-assembly, I really didn't want another white Honda. So I decided to do this one in the original Columbia Blue which Honda used on a few of their smaller bikes in the early and mid '60s. Not many were sold in that color, (maybe just less were actually shipped in Blue) however it now seems to be the most desired restoration color.
So anyway, I'll spare you the pics of the disassemble and inventorying the needed parts. All the plastic pieces were replaced with NOS in Columbia Blue so they wouldn't have to be painted, just as the original. I found out soon enough that the blue plastic parts were double the price of any other color.:icon_mad:
Here it is, starting from square one, frame only.


And some of the many pieces that had to be painted. I decided to due an extra tank as well.


First thing to do was get the shock absorbers put back into the leading link front suspension


Once the forks and triple tree were put on, the horn and ignition switch is installed. New paint had to be die-grinded in order to get a ground connection to the switch. Magneto ignition is grounded through the switch.


Pulling in the main harness requires two wires to pull with as the harness is wye'd, and needs to come out a hole on each side of the frame.


Handle bars and some cables were installed next, after some switch wiring repair was done.


Adding the center stand, swing arm as well as both rear shocks. Also the coil and rectifier are now installed inside the frame.


After grinding a couple more grounding spots for the bracket and backing plate, the tail light assembly is installed and wired. Bulb was replaced and grounding confirmed.


Rear wheel on, plus speedometer and head light bucket.


The front fender has to go on before the wheel and is mounted to the top shock bolts. Then the front wheel is installed. Now starting to look like a C110:)


Front and rear brake stays and all the little lever's and springs, turns this bike into a "roller"


Just some final electrical testing before going any further.


Head light in and tank installed with chrome side covers and badges in place. New petcock is also installed.


Seat in place now, but waiting on a new side cover latch bolt as well as both passenger pegs. Part's seem slow to get here and hard to find in some cases.


A view from the right side


And maybe the crowning jewel....the damned expensive OEM mudflap to replace the ugly piece of rubber that was hung there before.


I had intended to have this completed by end of Sept for a show. but I got lazy as usual and hadn't even opened up the engine to go through it at that point. Next post I will show you the engine and exhaust system installation and bunch of other odds and ends. I needed to get it to this roller stage so parts wouldn't start to disappear magically as they have done for me before. At my age if I hide stuff, even I can't find it again.:confused:
More to come, as I post the final wrap up of this project.
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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14,300 Posts
That is a good looking restoration
 

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Very nice. I also am curious about your shop, if you care to comment on that.

Looks like you have top flight facilities and tools. And yes,we are interested
 

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Nice job!

I am envious of your shop as well! ;)

Is that a black CB77 in the background? I used to have one (1967) and just picked up a 1967 CA77 Dream to restore.
 

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Vintage Rider
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420 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Very nice. I also am curious about your shop, if you care to comment on that.
I'll comment on my shop later, probably in another thread.

Is that a black CB77 in the background? I used to have one (1967) and just picked up a 1967 CA77 Dream to restore.
Yes, that's a CB77 on the other lift. I've got a restored '67 CA77 as well as a '65 CL77 also in my collection.

Back on track with the build.
The messy job of tearing engine down for new seals, gaskets and whatever else needs attention. Engine was leaking alot and had a tendency to jump out of 2nd gear. So needed to address those issues. Doing a quick job on the lift as my engine rebuild table was covered with........well other engines.:icon_mad:
Almost apart here! Then the cleanup....Just no way to make this look pretty:frown:


After putting the engine cases back together, leaving the cast iron parts off makes this a real lightweight and allows me to use one hand and hold it in place as I put the lower bolt in first. Also made sure I have motor well grounded to the frame.


Put stator, neutral switch and drive sprocket in place, as well as case vent. Now to sort out the remaining electrical connections.

Got a little top end work left and then should soon be ready to fire!!!

Next it was time to get the top end on and finish this project!
Here I've slipped the barrel on with new seals in place and arrow on piston pointing down. Honda says point arrow forward, but which way is forward on a horizontal engine??:confused:


Head is torqued down and valve cover installed. The rear foot pegs finally arrived and were put on as well.


Chain cases are always a pita to fit right but finally got them on as well as the left engine cover, shift lever and front foot pegs.


And next up is the carb with cable and exterior oil lines. Then the muffler and it's done!


And finally here it is, my almost new again Honda C110, or every 14yr old's dream bike in 1964:biggrin:


Here's a picture of this model from a '66 dealer brochure for comparison.


After researching original photo's, ad's etc. it appears that the head being aluminum, should have no paint. My original photo appears it was silver, but when I looked at all my other push rod bikes, (C100's, C102, C100T, C105T's, C200 and CT200) all had flat black heads, so without further research I assumed my C110 should also be black. Guess I was a little lax on my research this time! Since originality is always my top priority, I'll be changing that as well as the mounting of my front mud flap, which had also been pointed out should be mounted outside the fender and behind the brace (appears he was correct also).
Here it is with the head back to original as well as front mudflap mounted correctly.

Just some cleanup left and it'll be ready for it's first show.:)

Here it is at a small Car & Bike show last fall, with a couple of my other bikes, (a CA77 and a '68 CL175 Honda's)


Showed it again this spring at a large show, this time with my Yamaha '64 YG1 survivor bike.
 

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American Legion Rider
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Great job. You'll find you are right at home with several other restorers here.:thumbsup:
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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Excellent work, great looking bike
 

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Vintage Rider
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420 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Very VERY nice!! Did you paint the engine case? How did you get it to look like it does?
Yes, I did paint the cases. My favorite choice is Dupli-Color engine enamel w/ ceramic. Cast coat aluminum DE1650. Maybe not the most durable, but baked on or left in the hot sun when it's 90+ degrees out helps a lot. Also good match for Honda's original color.
 

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Female Rider
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9,311 Posts
Wow, great job restoring such a beautiful old guy. You will find that there are a LOT of members who love to see these rebuilds.
 

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Vintage Rider
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420 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Wow, great job restoring such a beautiful old guy. You will find that there are a LOT of members who love to see these rebuilds.
Thanks MONI, I plan to put up quite a few restoration logs on various bikes as long as everyone is interested!:)
 

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Help restoring honda c110

I split the block to replace the kick starter shaft. I put the block back together several times now and did it according to a parts fiche but I can not get the gear selector working. Any suggestions? It seems like when I tighten the case together the drive shaft gets harder to turn and then once tightened it take two hands to turn it. The gear selector is locked up when the two cases are put back together.
 

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We ran into the same issue a couple months ago when replacing the kickstarter shaft on a 66 C110. The new kickstarter was not machined correctly. compare the 2 shafts where they go into the case at the bottom of the shaft. The new one was not machined deep enough which causes the shaft to stick up to far causing the bind. We had to chuck it up in a lathe and turn down the new shaft.

I also have a question.... the intake boot that goes between the carb and intake, does it have holes in it? The new one does not but we are certain the original one did. The engine is running really rich and we cant get it adjusted. We have been through everything and cant figure it out.

Thanks
 

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Some of the spacer blocks had small pipes in them to hook up vacuum gauges if I'm thinking of the same part. Others had a hole that had a cap (allen) bolt in them that a fitting could be screwed into. Then again we could be talking about totall different items.

Mike
 
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