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Discussion Starter #1
How do I remove this sprocket?
I'm new to working on motorized things so I need all the help I can get
 

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From experience, I can tell you, that the Service Manuals are not much help, in the sense that they will say something like: "Remove bolts" but they won't say how, or whatever.

"Life" requires some diving in and trying, on a mechanical level. Starting off with a good set of tools (beyond the tool kit that comes with the bike) is valuable.

I spent a good deal of time being mentored by those around me in my younger years, who knew a thing or two about nuts-n-bolts, and how things logically worked together, in a mechanical sense. Perhaps there is someone around you like that? Someone who has done that sort of thing before, who would be willing to work "with" you, to walk you thru it successfully?

It's really about time, ability and money. Which ones of those do you have or not have? If you don't have the first two, but you have the third, then find a good (someone with a good reputation) repair shop near home, and let THEM do the work.

-Soupy
 

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One thing I have learned in all the years I've been around bikes, if you don't know what you are doing, working on a bike can mean death. If you own a cage and screw up, atleast you have a cage and seatbelt protecting you. If you forget to torque a bolt correctly on a bike, well, it could mean instant death. Nothing wrong with learning how to work on a bike, just have someone with you that knows what they are doing to double check your work.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
From experience, I can tell you, that the Service Manuals are not much help, in the sense that they will say something like: "Remove bolts" but they won't say how, or whatever.

"Life" requires some diving in and trying, on a mechanical level. Starting off with a good set of tools (beyond the tool kit that comes with the bike) is valuable.

I spent a good deal of time being mentored by those around me in my younger years, who knew a thing or two about nuts-n-bolts, and how things logically worked together, in a mechanical sense. Perhaps there is someone around you like that? Someone who has done that sort of thing before, who would be willing to work "with" you, to walk you thru it successfully?

It's really about time, ability and money. Which ones of those do you have or not have? If you don't have the first two, but you have the third, then find a good (someone with a good reputation) repair shop near home, and let THEM do the work.

-Soupy
I have a buncha tool that were left to me. Some I still dont know what they are used for. I just dont have anyone to really show me how to work on things like this so I need to self teach with the help of youtube and internet forums. It is something I want to learn and be able to possibly pass down later in life.

Sadly I dont even have a manual since I got the mini bike back in sixth grade which was some seven years ago. I bought a new chain but need to change the sprocket so it runs smoothly. One way or another I guess ill have to get off.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
One thing I have learned in all the years I've been around bikes, if you don't know what you are doing, working on a bike can mean death. If you own a cage and screw up, atleast you have a cage and seatbelt protecting you. If you forget to torque a bolt correctly on a bike, well, it could mean instant death. Nothing wrong with learning how to work on a bike, just have someone with you that knows what they are doing to double check your work.
Trust me I am all about safety and I am in no way thinking of riding this little death trap anytime soon. I just want to get it into a running and operating position. This little project is more of a moral boost to me to show me I could quite possibly get into something like this once this one is finished.
 

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You have to upload your picture to a photo site, like photobucket, and copy one of the share links into your post.

Also, if you add your location to your profile, you may find someone near you that can assist.
 

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If you wipe it clean, I think you'll see that there is a snap ring that holds it on. Look at the lower left of the output shaft; see the two tabs with holes, and a gap between them? There is a tool that fits into those holes, and works like pliers in reverse, pushing the tips apart. That expands that snap ring, so that it will come out of the thin groove in the output shaft, releasing the sprocket.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If you wipe it clean, I think you'll see that there is a snap ring that holds it on. Look at the lower left of the output shaft; see the two tabs with holes, and a gap between them? There is a tool that fits into those holes, and works like pliers in reverse, pushing the tips apart. That expands that snap ring, so that it will come out of the thin groove in the output shaft, releasing the sprocket.
Ahhhh this makes sense. I knew the tab had to come off I just didnt know what to do afterwards. luckily I have snap ring pliers! haha Hopefully this will be easy to do. Thanks alot
 
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