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That's a bike I never found interesting until recently. Made from 1961-67 it put Honda on the map & lead to bigger & faster bikes. Performance, reliability & price were hard to beat. I was just getting interested in minibikes when these disappeared so I barely remember them. I soon became obsessed with the new Honda CB350 which looked so much more modern. I remember seeing those frumpy looking CB77 in magazines & thinking they were from the 50s. The bike that Ward Cleaver might ride. But for their time they were quite advanced mechanically if not visually. I wouldn't have owned a Honda Nighthawk 650 & NC700X had the CB77 never happened first. It lead the way for Honda & others to some extent. It was the beginning of an era that continues today.
 

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I put quite a few miles on my CB77 305 Super Hawk, riding over 100 miles to visit my then girlfriend (now wife). Smooth running for a twin, and powerful enough for Interstate speeds (then 70mph here).
 

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I had a CB72-250cc and the CB77-305cc Superhawk at one time and just a few observations:

The engine design was technologically far superior to any of the larger big British bikes and the 305cc version would wipe the streets with stock 650-750cc 'Limey' junk,' that were like lawnmowers in comparison. The Brit bikes though beautiful, were very unreliable and their break downs even when new were legendary. OIL leaks? Amal carbs that actually were made to overflow the float bowl right on top of the hot engine and dribble all over everything. Lucas electronic's and Bosch stuff was supposedly supplied right from Satan himself. OH and did I mention how SLOW a typical 650 BSA-Triumph- etc was??? They also vibrated terribly. They were normally 3 to 4 times as expensive as the lowly CB77 that took probably 90% of their sales.

You couldn't even tell that the little twin was running, it was so smooth.

Then when the Honda CB750 hit the streets, it was 'game over' for the Brit's bikes.

Then when the Goldwing 1000 hit the streets, the world had a new paradigm shift to contend with.

At the time, Harley's were still being assembled with ballpeen hammers and visegrips:)

Sam:poop:
 

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I raced flat track (Amateur) with a late 1960's 305 Scrambler in the late 70's. Me and my father stripped it down, changed the sprockets, shortened the rear fender. I was not competitive at all on that bike but it was a lot of fun as I remember.
 
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