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I restored an 83 Goldwing and brother it wasn't cheap. If the money isn't a problem then the satisfaction can really outweigh the cost.
 

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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #6
I use MNC. Manual Numeric Control. Speed and feed by guess and by sight. And sometimes by smell too. :biggrin:

Been there, done that. Cutmaster VTL's and all the rest. Bridgeports, Grinders, ......you name it, I've used it. Lots of years in Manufacturing before moving into QC. Now 15 years in QC.

Really glad that after all that "real" work, I never lost a finger, or anything. Keeps me playin the guitar!! (lol).

"If you're gonna 'cut water,' ......always use TrimSol!' - SDC

-Soupy
 

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That old Indian could definitely use a ring job. The seat also needs a new cover. It can be done. I did it for my '65 BMW using naugahyde from a local fabric store.
The knuckle head with the knucklehead is not all there. He kicks it 4 or 5 times with no results and in the same video says it started on the first kick cold. Does he believe that sh!t or is he trying to convince us?
 

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Gone.
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He's correct. You have to turn the engine over a few times with the gas on and the ignition off to draw fuel into the cylinders. Then he turns on the ignition and it starts on the first kick.
 

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Left. No, the other left.
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On the top Henderson video, are those the gearshifts on the left of the tank???

He should get Sure from the other thread to do the paint.
 

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Eating GSXRs, Sh***ing CBRs
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...........especially because the parts would be hard to find, and pricey.

Unless of course you could fabricate all the parts you needed to replace, in your garage, on your CNC!

-Soupy
I honestly think this would all the the most fun parts of restoring an old bike. Hunting through the internet, swap meets, bike shows and motorcycle shops for the parts you need. As well as learning to fabricate the parts that you just can't find.
 

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Aging & Worn
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Discussion Starter #12
I honestly think this would all the the most fun parts of restoring an old bike. Hunting through the internet, swap meets, bike shows and motorcycle shops for the parts you need. As well as learning to fabricate the parts that you just can't find.

The "hunt"

The "Quest"

Yeah!

-Soupy
 

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I have been riding bikes off and on since I was 15 and my Dad (the mechanic) rode before me so I have seen a lot of old bikes in original condition rolling down the highway.

When I was working and making $$$$ I always thought I would like to restore a classic bike, something pre-1950 but when I went looking for one I went into shock at the prices, even for a basket-case!

I am retired now and live on a small pension so money is limited but I ran across a 1962 Honda 50 for REAL cheap, found out that all kinds of parts are available inexpensively, both original and re-manufactured, so it's now in my shop. It runs like a top but has a lot of minor issues so it is getting rebuilt over the winter. "Classic" is classic, big or small! :biggrin:

Ya gotta love the Internet when it comes to old bikes! Years ago, finding bits and pieces was next to impossible but now it's a worldwide flea market for old bike parts. I needed a turn signal switch - mine is beyond repair - and found one in another part of the country for $25 - didn't even haggle about the price. In The Old Days it would have taken 3 or 4 days of shop time to fabricate a replacement or years of searching, writing letters, and waiting for replies.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
................... In The Old Days it would have taken 3 or 4 days of shop time to fabricate a replacement or years of searching, writing letters, and waiting for replies.
In the END though.........that's half the fun, when you ride your "piece-meal" bike out in the town, and you get questions about it. You have a TON of tales to tell about how you got it all together!

-Soupy
 

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OK guys, I own a 1965 BMW R-60. The mufflers are shot and it needs a crossover pipe in the worst way. I have done the on-line search for parts and have found that a pair of mufflers will cost me more than I paid for the whole bike back around 1970. What the f**k is up with that?
 

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I have done the on-line search for parts and have found that a pair of mufflers will cost me more than I paid for the whole bike back around 1970. What the f**k is up with that?
It is a supply and demand issue. The harder it is to find something, the more it is going to cost. Same thing with restoring old cars.
 

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It is a supply and demand issue. The harder it is to find something, the more it is going to cost. Same thing with restoring old cars.
^^^^This.....
Plus, when you DO find it, don't haggle the price. It's guaranteed to cost more down the road, and usually when you make up your mind, it's gone.:frown:
 

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MacGuiver fixes

I find it very fun to fix a bike if i can do a repair,and sometimes a crude one at that instead of a restore. Two that come to mind are the ones that would have doubled the cost or more of the CB360.

The retaining screw on the main jet needle got loose,bounced around,and no way to re-thread it to the also battered female thread. Fixed that with a bit of vinyl tubing and and an Allen screw for 80 cents. Also,the brake hydraulic line was plugged beyond repair,so I drilled the banjo bolt and cleared the line with some .030 welding wire. Drilled and tapped the hole and the little machine bolt plus locktite has it fixed for maybe $2.00

The money I saved bought tires for the bike
 
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