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Discussion Starter #1
Had an odd problem this morning when I wanted to move my bike in my garage. It was quite cold, about 28 degrees, and I am not sure if that had anything to do with the problem. With the bike in Neutral I usually have no problem moving the bike forward or backwards despite the bike weighing over 900 pounds, but today I could barely budge the bike in either direction. When I started the engine and put it into 1st gear, it moved forward as it normally does. And since this Goldwing has a Reverse (which uses the starter to power it) I tried putting it into Reverse, and again, that seemed to work normally. But even after the bike was warmed up, moving it manually was really, really hard to do. I have no idea what might cause this problem. Any suggestions would be very welcome.
 

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Nightfly
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First thing I can think of is brake drag. I've never found colder weather causing difficulties in moving my bike when in neutral. If the bike moves but is just difficult to do so that would tell me it isn't stuck in gear. Take it for a ride, listen for any strange noise, like the caliper dragging of something out of the ordinary. If it is still hard to move around after the ride, put it up on the center stand and turn the back wheel, then get the front wheel off the ground and do the same. Also trying holding the clutch lever in when pushing the bike around. I can't think of anything else, especially if the bike rides without any problems...
 

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Maybe the oil in the transmission was thick due to the cold. You still have to rotate the countershaft and some gears even when the bike is in neutral.
 

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28 degrees is getting pretty cold for oils to move around and that driveshaft grease might be if harder to get moving. I doubt you have a mechanical problem vito, just some cold grease and oils that don’t want to move very much.
 

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You're getting older. Could be old cold bones.... Just messing with you. I know as I have aged, I dont seem to have the same level of strength during the winter as I do when its warm out. Luckily I live in Florida though...LOL.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I called my mechanic and he said if it is a frozen brake caliper that trying to ride the bike the 22 miles to his shop could do some real damage due to overheating the entire brake system. So I guess I call AAA since I have coverage that includes motorcycles, and trust them to properly get my Goldwing to the mechanic.

Just to try, I warmed the bike by running the engine for about 10 minutes, kept the clutch lever pulled in, checked that the tires were not flat, and still could not roll the bike in either direction.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
What makes this strange is that just a few days ago I was out riding without noticing any problems at all. The bike was sitting for just about 3 days unridden when I tried to move it in the garage. The first thing I looked at was the tires because it felt even worse than what a totally flat tire would have felt like when I tried to roll it backwards. I guess I should not be complaining. I've had this Goldwing for over 4 years, and have put 31,000 miles on it without a single mechanical issue. The only thing it has had done to it are oil changes and tire changes.
 

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I think this is where a lift comes in. With the front wheel off the ground, spin it, and there should be very little drag. The rear will have some drag from the drive system, but you should be able to tell if it is excessive.

Or, trailer it to your mechanic, and let him suss it out.
 

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On The Road Again!
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Goldwings have a small pinhole in the bottom of the master cylinder that relieves the pressure
in the system when you release the brakes.
If that small pin hole gets plugged up, when you apply the brakes
they won't release since the pressure stays in the system.
(just in case you'd like to try to fix it yourself)
 

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I didn’t realize it was that hard to move vito. It does sound like a brake issue so hopefully someone here can help get it moving so you can get it to the shop. Good luck. 👍
 

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I've had this Goldwing for over 4 years, and have put 31,000 miles on it without a single mechanical issue. The only thing it has had done to it are oil changes and tire changes.
Just noticed this statement. On my bike that would be a brake fluid flush well over do. Does it have any fluid in the reservoir? Is it possible it now has a bubble of fluid locking the pistons in place? Have you taken the reservoir cap off yet just to see what you got there? And when was the last fluid change done?
 
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Discussion Starter #15
I don't have a lift, and my center stand is a roll on/roll off stand where the rear wheel remains on the ground. So I am unable to try to spin either wheel. My plan now is to use my AAA membership and have the bike loaded on a trailer and taken to my mechanic.I hadn't thought about it, but having a brake fluid change seems worthwhile regardless of whatever is causing the problem.
 

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Draining the fluid, would probably get it rolling, but not stopping. Or levering the pads away from the discs. Nylon or hard wood wedge, should not scratch the discs. UK
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I don't want to take the chance of an unintended lock up of a brake. My one and only serious motorcycle mishap, twenty years ago, was where somehow a piece of gravel became wedged between my brake and the front wheel, and of course this was unknown to me at the time. I went to gently slow down approaching a curve and the front wheel locked up, throwing me off the bike. A few broken ribs and a punctured lung followed that and in the course of treatment a lung infection ensued, I almost died, and spent 31 days in the ICU followed by over two years recuperating. So this time I think having the bike trailered to the mechanic is a safer choice than trying to ride there.
 

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Is it possible to remove the caliper(s) and see if it rolls? Probably hard to get at with all the luggage though. I personally would not trust an AAA person with my bike especially with one that does not roll and would have to be rolled on and off of a roll back, kinda sketchy...
 

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Of course it is possible to remove the calipers, but it can be a fair amount of work, assuming the front. The rear is more work, just to get to it. Plus, without a lift, it can be back-breaking to bend down for it. I vote trailer, and I'm a long-time wrencher.
 

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So this time I think having the bike trailered to the mechanic is a safer choice than trying to ride there.
Oh yeah, I wouldn't ride it at all. Trailer that puppy but it would not surprise me one bit if by the time you get there it rolls free and easy. Just the bouncing around getting there could do that. Then trying to convince the mechanic there was a problem might be a challenge. At that point I think I would just tell him to do a full brake job. Like you said, you don't want to get thrown off ever again and you already stated you are well passed fluid change so maybe pads need replaced anyway. Sure couldn't hurt given the age and mileage.(y)
 
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