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Discussion Starter #1
I'm getting ready to do some maintenance for the end of the riding season, and one of the things on the to-do list is changing out the spark plug.

Is there a real difference in the different types of spark plugs out there? I've got a 2010 Buell Blast, so since it's a single cylinder I'll go with a top dollar spark plug if it actually makes a difference.
 

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The answer, as usual, it 'It depends'. I put iridium plugs in my old '70 CB450, which is known to have a fairly weak spark, and it starts easier, runs smoother. Did the same in my '05 Suzuki, and little difference, they just last longer.

Some brands hold up better than others, but I've yet to find any of those trick ones to work better, and many are worse, than standard plugs. I'm talking about the multiple contact, or other super new type, which make lots of promises.
 

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Female Rider
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We bought a set from our local Yamaha dealer for my old bike. It started stalling out like crazy. Got to the point of being dangerous to ride. Not knowing what the problem was, we tried all kinds of things and nothing helped. Then for some reason Randy decided to put the old NGK plugs back in. Problem totally solved. She still has them. So, Yes, they can make a difference.
 

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ZAMM Fanatic
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NOT using the manufacturer's recommended plug can result in ALL sorts of problems on today's fuel-injected, computer-controlled timing, coil-on-plug AUTOMOBILES. A carbureted bike with a traditional coil probably isn't as sensitive, but why take the chance?
 

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My old gal is a 1985 Yamaha Maxim 700. She has carburetors and it really made a difference with her. The ones we bought were the ones recommended by the Yamaha dealer and more expensive than the NGKs...go figure... :)

Good Luck to you
 

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Getting the gap set correctly is important too. My 4-Runner had a stumble on acceleration. I spent 3 months and $$ trying to resolve it --- new TPS, calibrating the TPS, testing with a borrowed AFM, you name it. One by one I eliminated nearly a dozen possible causes for the stumble.

Whoever worked on it last had gapped the plugs at .044, which was correct for LATER model 4-runners, not this one.

The really maddening part was a great tech I had spoken with at the beginning of the whole ordeal had said, "those 4-runners are REALLY sensitive to having the right plugs set correctly."

Because it didn't misfire at idle (lowest voltage) or under heavy load, which is where spark plugs usually break down, I was SURE it couldn't be plug related.

Bazinga.... :(

Be sure and use the correct kind of spark plug gapper if you want accurate settings. The type with round wires, not the round disk angle ramp variety. It's a go/nogo tool, do not FORCE the wires through the gap. Use the little "pry bars" on the ends of the tool, or lightly tap the electrode against a concrete floor/ bench vise to narrow the gap.

GOOD GAPPER:



BAD GAPPER:


GREAT GAPPER:

[/QUOTE]
 

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I prefer NGK's. I've had issues with AC Delco and I refuse to ever use Champions. The most important thing is the gap. Even if they say they are pregapped, check the gap. I just put spark plugs in my truck friday that where supposedly pregapped, no where close to what my truck called for.
 
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