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Discussion Starter #1
I ride a heavy bike. Its probably close to 800 pounds and I find it comfortable and easy to manuver at speed, but I never forget its heavy. Occasionally when coming to a stop, especially on a curve, I remember how important it is to stop the bike in a fully upright position because I know if I start to really tip, I may not be able to hold it up due to the weight of the bike.

Riding a heavy bike sometimes make me think about how nice it is to ride a really lightweight bike. You can "flick" a lightweight, and not worry about tipping over even in pretty extreme situations, and my mind sometimes moves to thinking about getting such a bike, at least theoretically.

The other day I had a chance to ride a lightweight bike, something I hadn't done in a long time. It was a 250 cc Honda that felt like it was as light as my bicycle. But it was poorly suspended, buzzy, relatively slow, and I woundn't ever consider trying to ride such a bike two-up.

So the theoretical advantages of a light bike met the reality of the advantages of my heavy bike, and I concluded reality outweights theory. I guess if someone comes up with a large engined, low revving powerful bike with great comfort and two-up abiity but only weighs about 350 pounds I will then be in motorcycle nirvana.
 

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Good description of both. The biggest issue I have when getting off my nearly 900lb Valkyrie and hopping onto my old CB450 is when I pull it off the side stand - I have to be careful not to throw the 450 onto its right side.;) With the 450, I don't have to carefully select my parking space on a lot that isn't level, either. Still, once rolling, the Dragon is way more comfortable and nearly as maneuverable, and it can pull a trailer if needed.
 

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American Legion Rider
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You can always go with LandinGear when you get to the point you think holding a heavy bike up might be a concern. Most would never even notice it but if you are too vain it might be a concern.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I keep thinking that the current solution for me is to get a second bike, with the new one being a smaller, lighter bike, or maybe even a scooter (years ago I owned a 150cc Honda scooter and it was more fun to ride than you can imagine. Sometimes I wondered why I bothered with a motorcycle since the scooter was so much fun. Its main limitation was a top speed of about 60 mph but for around town it was unbeatable for convenience and fun.)
 

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Got a good scooter for ya Vito:biggrin:

Sam:coffeescreen:
 

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You can always go with LandinGear when you get to the point you think holding a heavy bike up might be a concern. Most would never even notice it but if you are too vain it might be a concern.
Been looking at that for the future; at $3500 'introductory' price, it's kind of pricey, but lots better, IMO, than a trike kit.
 

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Just finished doing the BRC (15 years in the saddle, but then a 15 years hiatus - it seemed a good move). The bike they gave me was a Suzuki 250 "eliminator" that wouldn't eliminate anything... Joking aside, it was a fun little bike to zip around the range on, and I liked how light it was compared to my 800-lb-ish 1100 cruiser. I sure as heck was happy to do 'the box' on that vs. mine. OTOH, I agree with the OP's point exactly. I have no problem with my larger bike, and even if the 250 is easier to manage in parking-lot maneuvers and/or under 10mph... the other 98% of the time I prefer my big bike's stability and oomph.
 

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Just finished doing the BRC (15 years in the saddle, but then a 15 years hiatus - it seemed a good move). The bike they gave me was a Suzuki 250 "eliminator" that wouldn't eliminate anything... Joking aside, it was a fun little bike to zip around the range on, and I liked how light it was compared to my 800-lb-ish 1100 cruiser. I sure as heck was happy to do 'the box' on that vs. mine. OTOH, I agree with the OP's point exactly. I have no problem with my larger bike, and even if the 250 is easier to manage in parking-lot maneuvers and/or under 10mph... the other 98% of the time I prefer my big bike's stability and oomph.
Having said that... my first bike was a Honda CX500 and I do find myself tempted, especially when one shows up in good shape for cheap, to add a "light runabout" type bike to the stable.

My wife would frikkin' kill me though. She was a pretty good sport about the unannounced arrival of "look what I bought today!" with the first bike... #2 would probably put it over.

Unless it was "look what I bought for you, honey..." Hmmm.
 

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I just went from riding a lightweight (380lb) to a heavier (611lb) motorcycle. The extra 231lbs is noticeable, but so far in a good way. The increased size has increased the comfort for both solo and two up riding. I'll always appreciate the advantages of the lighter bike, but for how I prefer to spend my time riding a bigger and somewhat heavier bike is the ticket.

I can see how 800+lb bikes could present certain challenges. Even with my "middleweight" bike I've learned that some places I could park before without trouble are slightly more difficult now (such as backing the bike up on an incline).
 

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Swamp Rat Rider
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I experience this often when Ride my Victory Cross Country ( 850 lbs ) when Swap to my Scout which is 550 lbs but feels even lighter .. 2 Up is doable, but not using it for that yet as the Suspension is really lacking for doing so but working on that now ..
 

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A heavy bike puts riding in a whole new perspective. Things you can get away with on a small bike just don't fly on a big machine. I've posted this a number of times because I truly believe it's important. Checkout the Ride Like A Pro video, it's with buying. Practice the lessons and your slow speed riding and maneuverability will be great. Best thing I ever did when I stepped up to full touring bike.
 

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Good description of both. The biggest issue I have when getting off my nearly 900lb Valkyrie and hopping onto my old CB450 is when I pull it off the side stand - I have to be careful not to throw the 450 onto its right side.;) With the 450, I don't have to carefully select my parking space on a lot that isn't level, either. Still, once rolling, the Dragon is way more comfortable and nearly as maneuverable, and it can pull a trailer if needed.
That describes my experience the first time I sat on a HD Street in the show room and decided to stand it up. I almost embarrassed myself by dropping it on its right side. My normal ride is over 900 pounds wet.
 
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