Motorcycle Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey good people-

A couple of quick questions on the rear tire gearing on a vintage Honda Trail type bike. Why are there two drive gears on the rear and WHY is the one sooooo large? Did the bike come with a chain lengthener that could be attached "out in the field"? It seems the larger gearing would be for rock crawling, but the chain isn't long enough.

Is it an optional drive gear for an accessory while out in the filed? In the same way an old tractor used a belt drive for machinery.

(sample pic of what I'm talking about)
 

Attachments

·
Moderator - Loves All Motorcycles
Joined
·
1,251 Posts
So that's an "overlay sprocket" or what's commonly called a "cheater sprocket". The idea is that you'd use the normal sprocket on the road, but then switch to the overlay (big sprocket) when you go offroad. Bigger sprockets rob your speed, but what you lose in speed you gain in torque.

The impact is basically that the bike can basically climb vertical walls offroad. Then when you're done offroading you go back to the smaller sprocket to get back speed. Not sure if they came with a larger chain, but that was the purpose of the dual rear sprockets. It was an easy way to make a low power bike do better in the sticks. :)
 

·
Vintage Rider
Joined
·
424 Posts
They did come with an extra length of chain and master link which was kept in the tool kit. There are several different types of larger sprockets, some are the overlay style that are kept on a hub carrier when not in use, some are just side by side (dual sprocket) and the chain will run ok at a slight angle as well. In late '67 Honda came out with a sub transmission which only required a flip of the lever to change from high range to low range.
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
26,039 Posts
I was going to say something like that but not so elaborately. But what I didn't know is when delivered new if there was some cool way to switch back and forth between the two sprockets. Some quick link of some kind. Those are some very cool bikes but I've never heard how one switched sprockets. I'd bet when new they had something. I can't imagine selling a bike that could do that and not provide a way to easily do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So that's an "overlay sprocket" or what's commonly called a "cheater sprocket". ... Not sure if they came with a larger chain, but that was the purpose of the dual rear sprockets. It was an easy way to make a low power bike do better in the sticks. :)
Miss Mercedes- Thank you for the response. That's what I thought it was for, but with out the chain or extension kit, not very useful. The bike has storage areas, there would be plenty of room to hold a chain-breaker and a short section of chain.
 

·
Vintage Rider
Joined
·
424 Posts
You won't need a chain breaker, as when your on the large sprocket you have two master links. A small screwdriver will generally pop off the master link clip and it will pull apart easily. Just remember to put the master links clips in the right direction (closed end leading). You will however get chain lube on your hands so some cleaner is nice to have along.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,895 Posts
Above info is correct. Once upon a time you joined the chain with connecting links. There were also half links for a precise fit.
My theory is Honda tested the market in 64 and 65 with the 87 cc push rod motor, and the manual 2 speed, via the extra piece of chain. The farm supply places should have chain in about 10 foot lengths, and connectors. You also need a chain breaker.
They sold a lot of those bikes, well at least two, yours and mine. Enough that they upgraded the systems. An overhead cam motor, conventional forks, and a two speed gear box, behind the four speed.

You do not have the luxury of the newer improvements, but you do have one of the originals, whether it is a 64 or 65.
I am still working on mine. I need parts, like a piston.

UK
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
...They sold a lot of those bikes, well at least two, yours and mine. ...
I am still working on mine. I need parts, like a piston.
Hey UK- This is not my bike, just wondering how this works. However, I have found some unusual parts from these guys. Seems to be a family that found a stock pile of parts from a closed motorcycle shop. Good luck.

w_W_W.ebay.com/str/coopersantiques12?_trksid=p2047675.l2563
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
9,895 Posts
I will check Coopers.
My bike is typical of most Trail 90s. Bashed and bruised. I will get Push Rod running, and mostly leave him B and B'd.

UK
 

·
Vintage Rider
Joined
·
424 Posts
This was the most popular option until the built in sub tranny came along. It could be put on the swing arm of many models. Do a little research and you can find pictures of how it actually works.
Chalopy: Go-Matic!
 

·
American Legion Rider
Joined
·
26,039 Posts
Wow, that's a pretty cool gadget. Probably don't see many with it though.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top