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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm trying to figure out how to match rev downshift. I've just watched some youtube videos but they all seem quite confusing. You:
1. Pull in the clutch and release the throttle
2. (This is where I get confused) Do you change gear then blip the throttle, or blip the throttle then change gear, or can you kinda just mesh the two together and it doesn't matter.
3. Release clutch and get back on the throttle.
 

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American Legion Rider
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Do you have a reason for wanting to match RPM's to speed and gear? Just pull in clutch and down shift and slowly release. Unless you are trying to shift without clutch there really isn't a requirement to match RPMs. Maybe explain what you are after.
 

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Commute Racer
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2,225 Posts
Roll off the throttle and decelerate
Clutch in, click down a gear, blip the throttle, release the clutch

That second line is mostly one movement because it happens so fast, but start out doing it deliberately in that order.
 

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If you are asking this question you are not yet experienced enough to be messing around trying to use engine braking or other sport type riding techniques. First learn to ride properly, then add in engine braking.
 

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Commute Racer
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I don't agree with that logic. If you never learn how to do something, doing more of something else isn't going to bring you closer to learning the original thing. Sure there are steps in th process, but riding for another year or two isn't going to make him suddenly good at this technique if he never tries it.

The OP said he is a noob, but didn't say how new. Rev match downshifting isn't exactly an advanced technique. It's barely intermediate.
 

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Swamp Rat Rider
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Agreed ..

I've never had to blip the throttle to have a motorcycle go into a lower gear. I don't see the point.
Neither do I, downshifting alone will increase your RPM 500-1,000 anyway when go to a lower gear some EFI Models will actually stall when blip throttle making the ECU think you are requiring more fuel when is not needed ..
 

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Neither do I, downshifting alone will increase your RPM 500-1,000 anyway when go to a lower gear some EFI Models will actually stall when blip throttle making the ECU think you are requiring more fuel when is not needed ..
I agree also, the only time you really "need" to blip the throttle is if you're downshifting at too high of an RPM....downshifting when slowing normally don't "need" the blip...a lot of people use that blip to say "Hey, look at me!"
 

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Commute Racer
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On a bike barely louder than a sewing machine, there is no "look at me" factor, even pegging the rev limiter. You may be thinking about the folks "brapping" while sitting at stop lights.
 

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So long
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Downshifting technique depends somewhat on the bike.

If you ride a performance bike with a high compression ratio like mine (13:1), then you should rev match. If you don't it's like dropping an anchor when you let the clutch out!! :eek:

If you ride a cruiser with a low compression engine, it's not so critical. Low compression engines provide less engine braking so slowly releasing the clutch on a downshift is usually good enough to avoid skidding the rear tire or over revving.
 

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American Legion Rider
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But why would a noob be on a high performance bike to begin with? Never mind. EGO!
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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A good rider on a 250 will embarrass a average rider on a lot bigger bike.
 

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Female Rider
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My bike is not a "high performance" bike but if you down shift while going too fast without giving it a little throttle it will bark the rear. A friend of ours loves to ride my bike. He says it is so much lighter than his Goldwing that he can "throw" it around in a curve. He also says he loves the torque it has. Anyway, he downshifted once going a little too fast and it not only barked the tire, it kind of jerked the rear to one side. Could be bad for a noobie to do that.

So, OP, until you get used to your bike try not to downshift at a really high speed. If you are downshifting at a lower speed there shouldn't be a reason to blip the throttle. You will eventually get the feel of your bike and then you will actually feel when to shift. I hope this helps.
 

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Greatest Member Ever
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No offense V8, but in my opinion these "new technologies" like the slipper clutch, ABS and the dumbest one of all, Auto Traction Control (ATC) are not needed on a motorcycle if the rider knows what the hey they are doing. But alas, you can't stop progress. Personally, I think these high tech "advances" is what is responsible for the high rate of accidents Hawaii is experiencing with sport bike riders lately. It gives them false confidence and they start hotdogging as if they're on the racetrack, but they're not. They are riding on normal highways and they push the bike beyond their ability to handle it... end result, they die.
 
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