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2020 Kawasaki Versys 1000 SE LT+
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If this is your FIRST motorcycle, I'm going to assume you have little to no previous riding experience. If that is the case, this is jumping into the deep end of the pool. This is a cruiser-style bike, which is not as easy to handle as a standard style bike.... and it's also a pretty large and heavy bike. The standard advice for a new rider is to take the MSF course for a new rider before you buy anything.... then, after you've had a taste of riding and mastered the most basic skills, get a standard style bike no larger than a 650 - fairly light and easy to handle. After a year or so, and 1,000 miles or more, go ahead and buy the bike you want.
 

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Your first bike isn't your last bike. You dont have to buy the bike you want to end up with for your first bike. The DCT will make some things easier but like wwb said, the weight, poor braking ability, and limited lean angle makes that the type of bike that isn't forgiving to minor mistakes. You want lightweight with less than 50lb-ft of torque, and really good front brakes. I always recommend a used FZ6, they're about $3500 and have 100hp, but very little torque so small mistakes with the throttle won't bite you. Also consider that most new riders, if they don't crash, they at least drop the bike in some hilariously stupid mistake while stationary. Its going to sting a lot less if you do that to some 15 year old cheap bike that you're going to get rid of in a year than it is to your brand expensive machine that will require real repairs.
 

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I don't want an automatic transmission on a bike... unless maybe on a touring bike.

For a cruiser, I think it's absolutely necessary to have the full motorcycle experience that includes shifting with left your foot and operating the clutch with your left hand.


But, to answer the OP's question, it looks like $10,000 - $10,500 is the standard price after delivery charges and dealer prep fees. Here in the eastern part of the USA.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If this is your FIRST motorcycle, I'm going to assume you have little to no previous riding experience. If that is the case, this is jumping into the deep end of the pool. This is a cruiser-style bike, which is not as easy to handle as a standard style bike.... and it's also a pretty large and heavy bike. The standard advice for a new rider is to take the MSF course for a new rider before you buy anything.... then, after you've had a taste of riding and mastered the most basic skills, get a standard style bike no larger than a 650 - fairly light and easy to handle. After a year or so, and 1,000 miles or more, go ahead and buy the bike you want.
Thank you for the reply and the advice. I did take the MSF course and do understand what I am getting into. My plan is to spend a great deal of time learning and getting comfortable on my new motorcycle before I go out into everyday riding.
If this is your FIRST motorcycle, I'm going to assume you have little to no previous riding experience. If that is the case, this is jumping into the deep end of the pool. This is a cruiser-style bike, which is not as easy to handle as a standard style bike.... and it's also a pretty large and heavy bike. The standard advice for a new rider is to take the MSF course for a new rider before you buy anything.... then, after you've had a taste of riding and mastered the most basic skills, get a standard style bike no larger than a 650 - fairly light and easy to handle. After a year or so, and 1,000 miles or more, go ahead and buy the bike you want.
Thank you for the advice. This may not be an issue anymore since I can't seem to find a 2022 Rebel. Not much around here other than Harleys
Your first bike isn't your last bike. You dont have to buy the bike you want to end up with for your first bike. The DCT will make some things easier but like wwb said, the weight, poor braking ability, and limited lean angle makes that the type of bike that isn't forgiving to minor mistakes. You want lightweight with less than 50lb-ft of torque, and really good front brakes. I always recommend a used FZ6, they're about $3500 and have 100hp, but very little torque so small mistakes with the throttle won't bite you. Also consider that most new riders, if they don't crash, they at least drop the bike in some hilariously stupid mistake while stationary. Its going to sting a lot less if you do that to some 15 year old cheap bike that you're going to get rid of in a year than it is to your brand expensive machine that will require real repairs.
I don't want an automatic transmission on a bike... unless maybe on a touring bike.

For a cruiser, I think it's absolutely necessary to have the full motorcycle experience that includes shifting with left your foot and operating the clutch with your left hand.


But, to answer the OP's question, it looks like $10,000 - $10,500 is the standard price after delivery charges and dealer prep fees. Here in the eastern part of the USA.
Thank you for the advice. Doesn't seem like I'm going to get a Rebel anyway. None to be found around here.
 

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According to Cycle Trader where you can search for motorcycles by zip code or state, there's 24 1100 DCT Rebels for sale in California at this moment. During the Pandemic, the ability to negotiate has been reduced substantially due to the supply chain woes. Honda's charging $775 for shipping, so I would expect to pay that plus a setup fee, sales taxes and any registration/license fee. It can vary some by dealer. You might get lucky by calling around, but again, there's little wiggle room these days.

People can start on larger bikes, but a smaller more nimble bike is more forgiving of the mistakes most make when learning to ride and a better tool to learn the skills that will save you on the road. They're needed more than ever now that a lot of people are on their phones or just generally more distracted. With a heavier more potent motorcycle, in addition to learning the necessary riding skills, you must be concerned about managing the power and weight of a bigger bike, so it raises the learning curve significantly. Kind of like learning to fly on 747.

Plus, the porbablility you're going to drop your new $12,000 Rebel is fairly high. You're better off dropping a used bike that was probably already dropped and you can likely sell for close what you paid for it, than taking a $3,000 depreciation hit cause it was knocked over and there's now a dent in the tank or forget to put the kickstand down, which I have personally done. Welcome and good luck my friend.
 

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2018 Yamaha SVTC
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If this is your FIRST motorcycle, I'm going to assume you have little to no previous riding experience. If that is the case, this is jumping into the deep end of the pool. This is a cruiser-style bike, which is not as easy to handle as a standard style bike.... and it's also a pretty large and heavy bike. The standard advice for a new rider is to take the MSF course for a new rider before you buy anything.... then, after you've had a taste of riding and mastered the most basic skills, get a standard style bike no larger than a 650 - fairly light and easy to handle. After a year or so, and 1,000 miles or more, go ahead and buy the bike you want.
I would agree with this initial recommendation and add that bikes with DCT are very hard to control with slow speed maneuvering even for an experienced rider. This fact is noted by the leading national champion in slow speed riding when attempting to do it on a DCT bike.
Not recommended for a newbie rider.
Also, don’t buy a NEW bike for your 1st bike. Get something that you’re not gonna cry if you drop it because you WILL drop it while learning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
According to Cycle Trader where you can search for motorcycles by zip code or state, there's 24 1100 DCT Rebels for sale in California at this moment. During the Pandemic, the ability to negotiate has been reduced substantially due to the supply chain woes. Honda's charging $775 for shipping, so I would expect to pay that plus a setup fee, sales taxes and any registration/license fee. It can vary some by dealer. You might get lucky by calling around, but again, there's little wiggle room these days.

People can start on larger bikes, but a smaller more nimble bike is more forgiving of the mistakes most make when learning to ride and a better tool to learn the skills that will save you on the road. They're needed more than ever now that a lot of people are on their phones or just generally more distracted. With a heavier more potent motorcycle, in addition to learning the necessary riding skills, you must be concerned about managing the power and weight of a bigger bike, so it raises the learning curve significantly. Kind of like learning to fly on 747.

Plus, the porbablility you're going to drop your new $12,000 Rebel is fairly high. You're better off dropping a used bike that was probably already dropped and you can likely sell for close what you paid for it, than taking a $3,000 depreciation hit cause it was knocked over and there's now a dent in the tank or forget to put the kickstand down, which I have personally done. Welcome and good luck my friend.
Thank you for the advice. In negotiations for a used 500. Hope that will work out better
 

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Thank you for the advice. In negotiations for a used 500. Hope that will work out better
I will ask one thing. What is your height and weight? If you’re a large man you may want to consider as large as a 700cc. I anticipate your riding skills progressing well, and as such in less than a year you’ll find the 500cc too small.
I learned that from my own experience back when I started riding. I bought a NEW 500cc and by years end wished I had gone slightly larger.
Then again I’m 6’3” and at that time weighed 215.
I’m just trying to help you get something properly sized for you.
 

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I'm working towards a 2-bike stable with a 525 pound 1200cc BMW for open road and lowering my 300 pound Suzuki DRZ400 to a reasonable saddle height to be my runaround bike. The 400 thumper has plenty of power, acceleration and torque to serve me on short trips. Anytime I plan to hit the open road for an hour or more, the road-eating BMW will be employed. Starting off with a moderately sized runabout, particularly a used one in good condition [from a dealer if you aren't an experienced biker] gives you a nice get around bike no matter what you end up with as your primary two-wheeler.
 

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Fit is always important on a motorcycle as you're more locked into a single position than you are in a car, so I would go sit on any bike that I was interested in to see how it works for me before spending my herd earned money. I've had motorcycles I liked that were a no-go after sitting on them and others that were outside what I thought would be good for me, but somehow were suitable for me. Everyone's a snowflake too, so what works for me may or may not work for someone else. The best way to find out is to sit on them for yourself.
 
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