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2007 Yamaha Road Star Silverado 1700
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4,672 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I'm looking at picking up another bike, and I came across this 1997 FLHTCI for what I feel to be a pretty decent price.

http://tucson.craigslist.org/mcy/4664857585.html

And, call me crazy, but I'm kind of digging the paint job.

My biggest concern is the mileage. Would I be looking at a top end overhaul shortly after I bought this thing?
 

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I don't think so, 91K isn't that bad as long as the maint. was done, and it had an overhaul at 50K.....I kinda like the paint job too..and if I had the money....you wouldn't be able to buy it, cause I would be there tomorrow with the cash lol

go look at it, take it for a ride and see how you like it...
 

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Aging & Worn
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You know.........if it runs good, you can always tweak any weaknesses it has.

It certainly is (what I would call) a "Theme bike." THAT'S for sure!!

You buy it, you own it...........just check it out real good. I'm not scared by accumulated mileage on a vehicle, but it really depends on maintenance records, and current condition.

If you take a tally on the things you know you will be doing to it, to bring it up to your standards of performance is higher than reasonable.........that's a reason to walk away.

-Soupy
 

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Gone.
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Like Goliath said, if the maintenance was done it won't need any engine overhauling. Which makes me wonder, if the maintenance WAS done, and by a by a Harley mechanic to boot, why did it need a top end job at only 50k miles? I'd ask about that.

I wouldn't be worried about the mileage too much, but you do have to keep in mind that a 17 year old bike with 100k miles, no matter what brand, is going to likely start to have some wear issues. Rubber seals get dry and crack, cables start to abrade, and so forth. Chance are you're going to have to do a little extra now and then to keep her on the road. Me, I like being intimate with my machines and I like projects, so that's not a problem here. The good part is that you'll be able to readily get parts for that bike for the next 50 years or more, so if you decide to keep it forever, you can.

The price seems a little high, but that might be due to this area. It has the older Magnetti Morelli EFI system, so you might want to ask if it's had a fuel controller added, such as a Power Commander or the like. As for the color, well, you're ready for a zombie outbreak for sure.
 

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Like Goliath said, if the maintenance was done it won't need any engine overhauling. Which makes me wonder, if the maintenance WAS done, and by a by a Harley mechanic to boot, why did it need a top end job at only 50k miles? I'd ask about that.
I'm thinking that maybe the first owner didn't do too well with maint. and the second one (the mechanic) had to fix the mistakes?

I bought my first bike brand new, .08 miles on it when I pulled out of the lot, a month later it was back at the dealer getting an oil tube that ran between the cylinders replaced (factory screw up) once in a while a bike will slip through with something just out of tolerance and break faster than usual....but again, like I said, since it was done 50K ago....it should last a while longer now
 

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Oh, I agree. Sometimes chit just happens. It could also be that the previous owner decked the heads or wanted to do some other upgrade that involved taking apart the top end. But since a top end rebuild isn't normal at 50k or 150k I'd still want to ask why it was done.
 

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2007 Yamaha Road Star Silverado 1700
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4,672 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
I just emailed the guy about why the top end was rebuilt at 50K miles. He had no clue why the previous owner (who was the Harley mechanic) did it.

The more I read about the EVO engines the more I'm willing to take a chance on this bike. From what I've read the EVO engines are MUCH easier (and cheaper) to rebuild than the newer Twin Cam engines.
 

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The difference in the cost of a rebuild depends on what parts you have to replace. For example if you have to replace the crankshaft in an Evo it's going to be a lot more expensive then replacing a crank bearing in a Twin Cam. The opposite is true as well.

As for Evo's being easier? They're a little more forgiving for the average ham-handed home mechanic, and they require fewer expensive specialty tools, especially for the balanced motors. There's also a much wider selection of after market (less expensive then OEM) parts available. And if worse comes to worse you can always find a good used Evo engine for lass then 2k.
 
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