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Discussion Starter #1
The fairing and plastic on the 83 VEnture Royale is missing a few connector rings that have inadvertently gotten broken through time, wrenching and accidental mishap...

I am sure that if I put it on the way it is, it will rattle trap down the road, and noone will be able to hear my incredibly great sounding exhaust...

does anyone have any sure ways to fix this horrible thing that happens to plastic fairings when they get old?:mad:(poor old bike...)
 

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Save them all!
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I use fiberglass to back weak areas.. Works great!
 

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Pale Rider
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I've used plumber's ABS Glue, available at any hardware store. It is ABS plastic, suspended in a solvent: when the solvent evaporates, only the solidified ABS plastic is left behind. It is black in color, by the way.

I've used it to repair two Vetter fairings, dating from the 1980's, a Vindicator, and a QuickSilver. I have also used it on the plastic fairing on my 1993 Kawasaki Voyager XII. Works well, inexpensive, easy to apply and use. I also used the plumber's ABS Cleaner, sold next to the Glue: cleans, and prepares, the plastic surface for the Glue. The cost is less than $30 for both cans, Cleaner and Glue. Cheers!
:coffee:
 

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American Legion Rider
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I always thought that stuff would be too brittle to fab new tabs if you couldn't bond it somehow to the piece. Is the cleaner the trick there?
 

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Pale Rider
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I am not sure if the cleaner helps a lot, or only a little. I just used it because they recommended it for pipes -- I figure it has to do something, besides lighten my wallet... :biggrin:

The ABS Glue is as brittle as the ABS plastic, itself. I used it mostly to seal cracks. I also glob it on (inside, where it is not visible), to reinforce the area. It is very liquid, in texture, so you need to contain it, or it will run, badly. I've used masking tape over cracks, on the visible side, applying the ABS Glue on the other side, filling in the void. When dry, the next day, I peel off the tape: leaves a rough finish, which can be sanded, if desired. The natural finish on the Glue, is smooth, and shiny.

For tabs, it would be best to have a mold of some sort. Clay would work: imbed the piece into the clay, then carve the desired shape in the clay, and pour/glob the ABS Glue into the open-face mold -- make sure the plastic edges are clean of clay, so that the Glue can bond with it. The thicker the piece, the better. Layers can be built up, with no issue: let each layer cure fully (24-hours, or more, depending upon thickness), then apply the next layer. Cheers!
:coffee:
 

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Gone.
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If you have a piece of the type of plastic your fairing is made of, and can shape it into something close to the tab you need, (or can mold something of the sort, as mentioned above,) you can use a plastic welder to attach it to the fairing.

I've used the direct-heat type plastic welder many times to attach parts or fix cracks in various hoods and covers and fairings. The most important thing is to make sure you're using the right type of filler rod for the plastic you're working on. I'm no plastic welding expert, but I have learned that it's worth the time to research the materials you're working on! Also a good trick is to imbed some stainless steel screen mesh in the plastic as you work the tool over it.
 

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American Legion Rider
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I've tried plastic welding. It isn't easy. Finding the right plastic rods or donor material is the problem which is basically the root of this thread.
 

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I bought "variety packs" that had several of the most common rod types in them. If I needed a piece of donor material bigger then what I could find by cannibalizing something from the trash I usually could order it from Piedmont Plastics. (Which I was pleased to find also conveniently has a location here in Daytona.) Or look in your Yellow Pages for a local plastics store.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I have been using zinc flashing tape, bonded to the plastic with epoxy, then a layer of fiberglass for stength, and it is working well for the saddlebag repairs. I think the tabs might be a bit tricky, and might require a double zinc, with a layer of glass between them. maybe a couple washers epoxied apart the thickness of the plastic, then drilled out?
 
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