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American Legion Rider
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23,527 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
For all you experts out there. I have started painting part of my bike cause it has some buggered up spots. It's a 3 coat process. Base color, gold pearl and the clear.

Question. Do you sand between each layer or only the final clear coat to try blending with the original paint? I tried masking off to and edge for the blend. But I've read y'all sand so wondering now when?

Only if it looks like crap or do you remove the masking on each layer and re-mask. Sorta hate to remove the masking because it was hard to get everything covered just right.

If I don't have ripples I'm wondering why I need to sand but maybe it will become TOO clear as I go.
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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14,300 Posts
^^^translated means:

fine wet sanding :)
 

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American Legion Rider
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23,527 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I got the wet sand paper part. Just seems like each time I'd be sanding and expanding into the old paint and I tried to mask to edges to keep from doing that. Of course I've never used 1000 and 2000 wet sand paper. Maybe it's a non-issue versus the rough I started with.
 

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Premium Member
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5,640 Posts
I used 600 for the primer coats, then 600 to 1000 for the base. For the color and clear, 1000 to 2000. BTW, if you want that deep color look, for the first coat or two of clear, mix in a bit of the color, then finish with a coat or two of just clear.
 

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Secret Agent
2006 Honda CBR1000RR, 2008 Honda CRF230L, 2019 Honda CRF1000L
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2,908 Posts
Depends on the type of paint system you are using.

The days of sanding between coats of paint for an ultra slick paint job are history and were limited to the old lacquer paints.

Today's quality base/clear paints chemically bond to one another and you don't want to sand between coats. If you get trash in it, yes, send the trash out, put a little base over it.

Base/mid/clears work the same way. The midcoats(generally transparent with shades of pearl) is identical chemically to the base coat.

Some colors, such as GM's 434B, a red tri coat, uses a red tinted transparent (no metallic, no pearl) mid coat. This mid coat is also completely different than the base coat and requires its own catalyst. The mid coat goes on glossy, not quite as glossy as the clear.

This setup is similar to the old house of color candy colors .

If you are blending in on existing good paint, use comet and a gray scotch brite pad, wet, and scuff entire panel. This will allow paint to stick. Spray the base over repaired area, keep it as small as possible, but depending on the color your covering, it'll still need a little blending (fanning out from edge of repair, again, to a minimum). The mid coat sprays over the base coated repair area. A let down panel would be beneficial for a noob here. Otherwise, eyeball the new midcoats/base coat and compare to exist original tri coat. The mid coat will need to be blended(fanned) out farther (use light coats with mid coat.

Once base and mid are done, clear entire panel. Don't forget to tack cloth between coats and entire panel before clear(this does NOT apply to midcoats that are used on colors such as the aforementioned GM 434B).

If there's striping you want to retain, use 3m striping masking tape to cover stripes before base coat, remove before clear coat.

For pre paint prep. After panel is scuffed to paint, wash with dawn dish soap and let dry. Before applying any paint, use a paint prep chemical to wipe down the panel so you don't get fish eyes. Tack entire panel before starting to paint.
 

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Secret Agent
2006 Honda CBR1000RR, 2008 Honda CRF230L, 2019 Honda CRF1000L
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2,908 Posts
Jebus, I got sucked in to a 5 year old thread....
 

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Secret Agent
2006 Honda CBR1000RR, 2008 Honda CRF230L, 2019 Honda CRF1000L
Joined
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2,908 Posts
It's part of the 'Recommended Reading'. Everyone falls for it.
 
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