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Short Fuse
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Very true. If they start out hard, they would tend to compress more quickly and lose their effectiveness. But in reality by that time I probably will not be around anyway.
I've done the boiling water rejuvenation of oil seals for many years - does it work? I don't know, but living in the sticks at the time with no access to new seals, it was a last and only option. I figured that even if the seal only swelled 10% more, then that was 10% better than what I had.

Given the year and quality of your bike, it would not be running special seals that can't be bought from the local seal/bearing shop. I have owned MANY Hondas of different capacities over 50 years and VERY few times found that a seal or bearing was specific to Honda. They are generally generic metric seals and bearings. Honda do not manufacture their seals/bearings - they are outsourced to various companies -NSK, SKF, Timken....and so on.

Get o-rings the size of those currently in your motor and stop focussing on the minutiae that is not important.
 
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it's all about the shape of the groove and how the rubber gets pushed, the o-ring needs to dimensionally fit the groove.
 

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Honda Tiderls, Ural Solos & BMW R60/6
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#1 : O-Rings are not made of natural rubber .

Once the seal is hard that's that ~ yes you can soak it and make it softer but it'll dry right out again as soon as you put it in service where it contacts petroleum products .

Many common Honda seals and O-Rings are still made in China , I prefer to go to a bearing & sea house with the old one (or a N.O.S. hard one) and have the counter guy match it up .

Depending on where you're going to use it a Viton or silicone may be better and longer lasting .

Kudos on keeping n S65 on the road ! .

Pictures please .
 
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I would imagine on a S65 Honda the o-rings were made from rubber,
anything else would be a plastic or polymer
 

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Synthetic rubber, not the natural stuff .
 

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? You know better than this Trials .
 
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I know heat, oxygen or sunlight can be harmful to rubber, that if you want to cure rubber you combine it with sulphur which has almost the same affect and that synthetic rubber like materials come from petroleum, have not been around near as long as natural rubber and modern synthetic polymers are less susceptible to heat, oxygen or sunlight then natural rubber so they tend to have a very good shelf life that would result in more stable dimension retention and this is just one part of a gasket kit for a little 60 year old Honda motor scooter not a hydraulic seal for my 17 ton excavator.
 

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I'm an engineer and I work with various rubber compounds all the time. That is to say I know more about rubber than most people. You can do things to 'trick' it into being softer and working better, short term, but that does not make it 'younger.' Unless you just enjoy taking things apart, I recommend against using anything old enough that it's visibly dried out, hard or cracked. You might get lucky, but if I have something apart I replace all seals even if they look good and I would use only fresh seals and O-rings if I have any choice in the matter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Not sure where you guys are finding these replacement o-rings, but I will check with the parts stores and maybe Ace Hardware.
 

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Not sure where you guys are finding these replacement o-rings, but I will check with the parts stores and maybe Ace Hardware.
Do you realize how many o-rings are used in farm equipment and heavy equipment!
Go to a farm supply, hydraulic or heavy equipment place and show them what you need, tell them you need about 10 of them.
 

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I saw people do that all day long in parts and sometimes it works and sometimes not. The post higher up saying all Honda o-rings were standard sizes was full of it too, they used to give the measurements of all rings and numbers like .9 of a mm, or .3 and the like. On first gen DOHC many rings used were b-stard size. Then you go to farm supply or other and then mix up SAE sizes with metric and again luck, some work and some don't. The pic in post #22 shows why and some rings mismatched will have maybe one arrow on top and bottom or 5 arrows depending on how tight it is. Tighter better to a point. Take typical auto a/c lines now coming from China, using mismatched rings to leak instantly and the brands got a bad name as garbage parts when all that is needed is somebody competent to fit a correct o-ring to seal right.

You measure the groove depth and add .010"ish for compression and you are there; part seals forever.

Most people are absolutely incompetent at picking a correct size o-ring, I cured countless problems concerning them and proper fit to make something work forever. The tenths of a mm. (004") can easily kill you there.

I doubt seriously natural rubber ever widely used on engines, they get too hot. Buna (nitrile) used probably most and a synthetic. What you generally get at auto stores. Widely used by Germany in WWII.
 

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Unlikely my farm supply would mix up metric with imperial, Canada had to learn the metric system long time ago :LOL:
 

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Short Fuse
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The post higher up saying all Honda o-rings were standard sizes was full of it too,
I didn't say ALL. Re-read my post. So you are saying that Honda (and by implication all automotive manufacturers) make every seal and o-ring specific to their application and can only be replaced by the branded one in the company wrapping?

Recently I replaced the steering head bearings and dust seals in my Aprilia Shiver. The factory approved and labelled OEM bearings are $30US each. $60US to replace the set. I pulled the front end and removed the original bearings - and guess what?

They were printed with NSK F202 - made in Mexico. I replaced them with NSK bearings from the local bearing store for $20US and also replaced the dust seals.

I have a fair idea which post is full of it.
 
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I agree ;

Matching O-Rings isn't that difficult, try it some time .

Most hydraulic hose places carry incredible varieties of O-Rings .
 
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Matching it closely is what I am saying to do, don't just expect it to be right or the same without close checking, like the bearing just mentioned, there is more than one bearing too. You have more heat treat for more $ and lesser for half the price and the class of fit and tolerance changes too. Put the cheap wheel bearings in your FWD car and dead in a year or even in 30 minutes, the crummy ones being devoid often of grease BTDT. The cheap one year bearing costs $25 and the better one $50 and same bearing same maker. The better one lasts forever, the lesser may not even go in the hole without cracking. Price is NOT the only thing to consider there and the same bearing number is only the start. I myself remove seals from sealed bearings to grease them again if they are still tight, they last even longer. I was subbing aftermarket bearings 45 years ago. I also use bulk straight heater hose on cars instead of the preformed expensive ones and on two cars I have that alone saves $100 per car. I rebuild the $350 computer alternators with my own at about $50 each and they last longer than any Ford one I've seen yet. Fifty other things there too. I rebuild my own ATX, do my own a/c work and alignment work too.

I might have bought OEM dealer parts maybe twice in thirty years, I sub others for the 'correct' part and am willing to do a little work to make it succeed if needed.
 

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Dead bang on about the bearing and seal quality, that's why I suggest going to a bearing house ~ The nice fellow at King Bearing looked at my 50 year old rear axle bearing ans asked if I wanted a better quality one this led into a discussion of same size bearings with more balls, allowing more weight = longer life in average uses and only a couple dollars more .

Because this was in an old BMC product that uses semi floating hubs I asked and discovered I could also get the better bearing with a single (my preference) or double sealing....

Sine then I've never suffered the common oil soaked brakes that many older British cars do, a win - win ! .

Same thing with O-Rings : I'm a Journeyman Mechanic with closing in on 60 years at it but I know enough to let some guy who handles O-Rings every day to better match them up than I .

It has often been said that the devil lies in the details and I agree .

Others might say 'I'm in a hurry' or 'good enough' ~ that's fine but don't blame the machine later when it quits .

I discovered the hard way that how you get that FWD sealed wheel bearing pack installed has a direct link to how long it lasts, this with nice (!!$!!) German factory parts no less .
 
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