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Discussion Starter #1
OK I have these two gaping holes in the bottom of my tank. I have no brazing, or welding equipment. How else could I fill these so they do not leak. I'm thinking a heavy mix of j.b.weld should suffice. Any feedback?
 

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ZAMM Fanatic
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If it were mine I'd take it to the best welder in town and let HIM braze it. That's a permanent repair. And much easier to re-do than if you use JB Weld and it doesn't seal the first time.

Can't tell from the picture if it's been brazed on before, if so he can't switch to TIG. it's too late!

Take along whatever plugs/hoses you need to plug all the OTHER openings.

Recommend you fill it with water and using your mouth on the filler opening pressurize the tank to check for leaks before you leave his shop.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanx wade, I'm asking some of my welding friends about brazing it. A couple do it for a living.
 

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Agree with the brazing! Any paste on patch, whether JB weld or whatever, isn't going to last. The last thing you want is to discover a massive leak at that location with a nice hot engine.
 

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find a replacement tank on eBay ... used but in good condition.
buy it and install. that gets you back to riding as fast as possible.

keep your spare tank ... and now that you've got xtra time ... take it to the shop and get their opinion about brazing (or whatever).

it never hurts to have a spare tank in your garage.
at a bare minimum - you'll probably need it if you drop your bike and get some dents. Or alternatively, if you want to do a color change and alter the paint scheme - having that second tank is a big advantage.

so all I'm saying is ... having two tanks for your bike isnt such a bad idea.

dT
 

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DON"T use JB Weld or any such stuff on it. I have an abandoned Honda CX500 that somebody tried to use some epoxy type stuff to patch the tank on. Eventually the gas ate through the patch, but not before it dissolved part of it. It made its way into the carbs and then set up like glue--- pretty well destroyed them. Epoxy is considered a permanent repair, BUT it has a life span. Eventually, and it might take years, it will over cure and fail. I used to do electronics work, and even when components are epoxied into metal heat sinks, we used to heat the epoxy and flake it out from around the components. Brazing or welding are the only reliable ways to fix a tank. You can check with a local radiator shop--- they can usually fix it, then pressure test it for you.
 
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