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American Legion Rider
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Nah, just use grease. It sticks so you'll always have lub. Even in 100º temps.











Hope no one actually falls for that.:D
 

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Premium Member
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Oil

I figure if the guys at the factory are smart enough to build the bike, they ought to be smart enough to tell me what oil to use. So I break the cardinal male rule: I read the instructions.
Just loaded up on Hypoid and Molyibdamin and a bunch of other weird named stuff, for my XS1100.

I like the grease idea. Back in the day, seizing two stroke race bikes, was a favorite pastime.

Unkle Crusty*
 

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Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
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Ever heard of Bean Counters Crusty?

They are not going to put something in a vehicle that cost more than something else they can use.
 

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Very Famous Person
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Ever heard of Bean Counters Crusty?

They are not going to put something in a vehicle that cost more than something else they can use.
--

Exactly! Anyone who discounts the money angle and the lawyers' protection warnings are missing the whole story. We have that attitude at its most during the car tire discussions.

--
 

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3,201 Posts
I like synthetics in my bikes, mostly because it is less susceptible to breakdown from heat. Very nice on my air cooled bikes, so I just put it in everything.

That said, some of you may know of Blackstone Laboratories. They are one of the leading engine oil analysis companies. They are very well know in the diesel engine community, but they analyze sampled from everything. Here is what they think.

What's the best oil to use?
Ah, the million dollar question. We are an independent lab, so we don't make recommendations. It has been our experience that oil is oil, and either petroleum or synthetic-based oil will work well for just about any engine.

Come on, you're holding out on me. I should use synthetic, right?
Buddy, you should use whatever you want. Synthetic oil won't guarantee a longer engine life any more than my eating organic food will guarantee I'll live until I'm 90. We here at Blackstone generally use regular petroleum-based oil because honestly, it works just as well for us.

http://www.blackstone-labs.com/faq.php
 

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Premium Member
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Oil

Ever heard of Bean Counters Crusty?

They are not going to put something in a vehicle that cost more than something else they can use.
Possibly, but the stuff that meets the standard described in my Suzuki owners manual, costs a bunch. I am using Rotella synthetic in the Suzuki, and Rotella diesel 15 40 in the Yamahas.
The Yamaha manual does not give me a rating spec. The diesel oil also goes in the boat motor, a small diesel.

Unkle Crusty*
 

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As per my observations synthetic oil is better than mineral/petroleum as wear & tear of engine is less as compared to mineral /petroleum


Sent from my SM-G316HU using Tapatalk
 

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Let me share what oil i am using. i use HDEO or Diesel engine oil for my 2 bikes. i prefer monograde that multi grade. at first, i am kinda nervous and reluctant. but now as per experience that is the best oil i ever tried, no clutch slippage, gear shifting is great. but i live in a tropical country, it is not be suitable in some country.
 

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American Legion Rider
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Mine has an engine???? I thought that twisty thing on the right side was all I had to worry about!:confused::D
 

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You may want to search for the MSDS for that oil; many have very little actual synthetic base in them. Many prefer Rotella T6 5W-40, which is all synthetic, and cheaper than that at WalMart.

In any case, I would still follow the manual change period. There are some synthetics with long-life additive packages, and have been tested to last longer - Amsoil comes to mind, if you want to pay for it. That one makes no such claim. It is the additives, not the base oil, that determine oil life.
 

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I think it is the particulates in oil that cause engine wear more than anything else. Changing it on the recommended schedule is the best policy.
 

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I think it is the particulates in oil that cause engine wear more than anything else. Changing it on the recommended schedule is the best policy.
That, and the corrosive chemicals in the blow-by combustion gasses. The additives keep the particles from clumping together, buffer the chemicals, and have high-pressure lubricants to keep the moving parts from touching, like ZDDP; all of these wear out with use.
 

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Gone.
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Look at it this way: Let's say you use synthetic and because it lasts longer you extend your oil change interval from every 5,000 miles to, say, every 8,000 miles. The oil will last at least that long, so this is a good thing, right?

Well, what you've done is to increase the amount of time your engine is using contaminated oil to provide lubrication. Over the course of 50,000 miles your bike will be running almost 19,000 miles on dirty oil that should have been replaced with clean oil. That's about a 37% increase.

Also, in the extra 3,000 miles you've added between changes the oil keeps getting contaminated so now the oil is even dirtier than when it was when it should have been changed at the 5k mark.

In addition, as the filter element gets dirtier because it was not changed it starts to restrict oil flow more and more. This causes more and more oil to by-pass the filter completely so less and less contaminants are getting scrubbed out of the oil.

This is a kind of a simplistic view of what happens, but you get the idea. The point is that no matter what type of oil you choose to use, it's best to change it at the intervals recommended by the people that designed your engine. Extending your interval may save you a few pennies in maintenance costs but that's not worth the potential costs later on.
 
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