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Okay, so in order to take care of both my motorcycle (2000 Yamaha 1100 Classic) I want to use the best oil, and presumably this is synthetic (or so I have been informed). However, I was also informed that using synthetic in an engine that has been using regular oil can be very bad for it. Is this true?
 

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'NOW THATS THINKIN WITH YOUR DIPSTICK"

I have heard that same thing as well, but I heard it about old cars. Like that 1992 F-150 with 192,000 on the clock, probably shouldn't be switched over to syntetic, oil sludge is probably the only thing keeping that thing runnin. On a bike though thats a 2000, I don't think it would cause you any trouble. However maybe rex or oil doc (aint seen him in a while) will chime in for ya.
 

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NO its not true, its a myth. synthetic is fine after the break in period. On a really old bike you might cause it to leak a bit if you switch to synthetic due to the gaskets unclogging and revealing leaks that were plugged up.
 

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NO its not true, its a myth. synthetic is fine after the break in period. On a really old bike you might cause it to leak a bit if you switch to synthetic due to the gaskets unclogging and revealing leaks that were plugged up.
One comment I found interesting pertaining to synthetics was the one about break-in. The comment made the point that Porsches and Corvettes came with synthetic in them to start with. That even the break-in thing was pretty much fiction too in modern engines. Makes me wonder if it is much of any big deal for the most part.

An interesting show I saw about synthetics comes to mind too. I saw a show where the oil discussed was Synthoil, if I remember right. The guys did vintage car/racer restoration and talked about the oil. In a search I found a Lubro Moly Synthoil, so maybe it was that company. Regardless, what I found interesting was how they used the oil based on their research. With their racing, they ran the oil during races in the cars. After the races they drained the used oil - then used that oil in the transport. When they drained that oil they used it in their lawn mowers and other power equipment. Apparently they were doing the testing and such to justify the useage. The testing apparently showed the oil was still good for each useage.

They also spoke of a customer who had a cooling system issue and more money than brains. He drove a E type Jag with engine temps reaching well over 300 degrees due to a cooling issue (don't remember what it was) and getting hot enough to partly melt spark plug wires, to get home. The guys tore the engine down and found ZERO damage due to the overheating - with 50s or whatever metalurgy that was kind of amazing to me.

That little story and those old "frying pans of oil" cook off commercial from Mobil kind of sold the quality of synthetics to me. Just made sense. I don't run synthetics due to cost, but may just start to do so and double my miles between changes (read as lazy) since most of my riding gets the engine to full operating temps to "cook off" any moisture and junk. At least on the Zephyr, I change the KLX often due to dirty conditions and may not really benefit from the synthetic.

As for high mileage, off topic I know, I remember getting an old C10 Chevy six that had been pretty much abused for the last several years. A friend told me to get the most high detergent 10w40 oil I could get (which was Quaker State back then) and a can of STP. Change the oil, run the truck a bit for warm up, then warm up the STP, put it in the running engine, then go for a long drive to make sure the STP blended in with the oil adequately. Then change the oil within 600-1000 miles. He said the high detergent would "wash out" a fair amount of sludge and deposits. Man, the crud that came out with that initial oil change was wild. Then I went, back then, with Pennzoil 10w40.

Anyone ever messed with this sort of thing currently?

I know most bikes don't seem to suffer from the sludge thing too much, after having done work on my own bikes and having seen a few hundred engine internals at the bike shop. It may be a tribute to the new oils, but it seems those ATVs that get ignored really bad end up actually having that sludge build up. It either speaks of the quality of engine oil blends since the 60s or that bikes don't get quite as much opportunity for sludge build up.
 

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One actual on-topic quality comment - I'd be sure to use a motorcycle oil just to be certain that there was absolutely no risk of any additives that could affect the clutch performance. I personally just don't go along with "hear-say" on that area. I figure quality oil companies KNOW what will/won't work and will provide the proper blend for a motorcycle oil in their motorcycle oil. And I would research the company before going with their product.
 

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Changing to syn. is an excellent thing to do for your bike. Just keep it clean and don't let anyone try to talk you into the 10,000 mi. oil change lunacy.
 

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Switching to synthetic will not harm an engine, even if the engine has many many miles on it. What it can do, however, is clean the engine better and reveal leaks in the engine that had previously been covered with sludge.

I have been using Amsoil 20w50 in both my bikes. One since the first oil change, the other was switched when I bought it with 23K miles on it.
 

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I heard synthetic goes better at high heat, which is great with an air cooled engine, my oil costs me $10 a liter, but I think its worth it given the miles I put on, and long trips in the summer time.

I've also got a 96 ford ranger, I'm thinking about putting synthetic in it, but I dunno.
 

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The best oil will definitely be synthetic, otherwise why would it cost twice as much? If your a apprehensive about switching completely, maybe start with a synthetic blend, then go to full synthetic if you like the results. When I bought my 96 Ram (i know its not a motorcycle, but engines are engines) i put in a synth. blend and when I changed that, it was DARK. I'm assuming all those detergents I paid a little extra for did their job. You could always go the seafoam route, I usually do a 1oz to 1qt ratio when I put it in my oil, seems to work pretty well, but i would only do this to standard oil.
 

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If I may- engines are NOT engines.
Motorcycle engines create much more heat and rev way higher than car engines. Racing engines don't do break-in, they just seat the rings. Big differences there.

I tend to weigh cost vs efficacy. Mostly, I use blends.
 

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Okay, so in order to take care of both my motorcycle (2000 Yamaha 1100 Classic) I want to use the best oil, and presumably this is synthetic (or so I have been informed). However, I was also informed that using synthetic in an engine that has been using regular oil can be very bad for it. Is this true?
No.....its safe to switch to synthetic. You will get tons of different opinion on what oil to use........car vs motorcycle oil.......blend vs full synthetic.....etc.

All I know is I used Rotella T6 synthetic oil in MY motorcycle.....sent a sample in for testing at Blackstone Labs and got a VERY favorable report. I will continue using it. My bike is a 106ci V-twin.....your bike is a 67ci V-twin (1100cc). Id imagine you'd also have favorable results.

The 5w40 synthetic T6 Rotella can be had at WalMart for $20 a gallon....your looking for a blue jug.



http://www.shell.com/home/Framework?siteId=rotella-en&FC2=/rotella-en/html/iwgen/products/zzz_lhn.html&FC3=/rotella-en/html/iwgen/products/t6_detail.html
 

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Having worked in motorcycle shops for right at 25 years I can say that I have never EVER seen an engine failure that could be traced directly to the type of oil that was being used.

Personally, I use SPECTRO brand 10W/40 standard petroleum in my four strokes. The independent shop that I help out in part time since my "retirement" carries only that brand. He has several GoldWing clients that have well over 100K miles with nary a hint of problems.

Oil use comes down to what makes you feel confident. If using a synthetic will ease your mind and make the miles click by better for you (and you can shoulder the additional cost), go for it.

In the interest of full disclosure, I use MOBIL1 5W/30 in my 2001 Camaro SS (41K miles) and MOBIL1 10W/30 in my 1995 Buick LeSabre (137K miles) and change them every 5K (with a Lucas oil treatment additive).
 

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oil slicks on the floor of the shop...

synthetic is alot slipperier than regular oil....

However My unc says he would never put synthetic oil in his engines.
His impression was like this,
Engines are made of metal, thats mostly a natural thing, even aluminum. symthetic oils are made of a bunch of crap the designers threw together,
If you put human crap vs natural metal ...well you see the point.

I thought about this alot...

the very best synthetic is made with advanced polymers that don't heat up,(they will cost about a 100 a quart. and they are designed to remain stable in any enviro that is LESS THAN 6 thousanths.(thats the crank tolerance of a CB750) suppose the stuff goes into an area that is larger than that, and gets whipped up. would it remain stable? I would think no.

IF you are worried about your oil, use a higher grade, with more viscosity.
change from 10-20 to 30 or 30 to 10-40, try a better blend
personally, I like the idea of saving oil. so synthetics look good....
up to you.. un-natural crap or natural goo,,, try some mobile oil, 76 station stuff(gold only please!)
 

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synthetic is alot slipperier than regular oil....

However My unc says he would never put synthetic oil in his engines.
His impression was like this,
Engines are made of metal, thats mostly a natural thing, even aluminum. symthetic oils are made of a bunch of crap the designers threw together,
If you put human crap vs natural metal ...well you see the point.

I thought about this alot...

the very best synthetic is made with advanced polymers that don't heat up,(they will cost about a 100 a quart. and they are designed to remain stable in any enviro that is LESS THAN 6 thousanths.(thats the crank tolerance of a CB750) suppose the stuff goes into an area that is larger than that, and gets whipped up. would it remain stable? I would think no.

IF you are worried about your oil, use a higher grade, with more viscosity.
change from 10-20 to 30 or 30 to 10-40, try a better blend
personally, I like the idea of saving oil. so synthetics look good....
up to you.. un-natural crap or natural goo,,, try some mobile oil, 76 station stuff(gold only please!)

Yeah.....Im not following any of that thinking. Your uncle is clearly entitled to his opinion.....but it makes zero sense to me.
 

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However My unc says he would never put synthetic oil in his engines.
His impression was like this,
Engines are made of metal, thats mostly a natural thing, even aluminum. symthetic oils are made of a bunch of crap the designers threw together,
If you put human crap vs natural metal ...well you see the point.


Think I would have to have a couple shots of Jack to understand your Unc .. :)
 
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