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Hey guys, i have one (i think) very simple question. So i have 2007. yamaha xt660x and so the previous owner used some oil that is replaced as he sad after 7000 km but hi is replacing it after 5000 and he changed it before i bought it from him. And now after 5000 km passed i was checking oil and it was normal color some kind of brown-red somthing like that and it was that color when we checked when we were buying it, so im wondering if its fine to keep that oil until it changes color or it would be better to replace it considering i dont really have money for oil right now, and what type of oil and gradient it could be i forgot, and is it good to replace that oil with some lighter oil that is changed after 2-3000, whats your opinion on this?
 

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You can't tell the quality of the oil by color. That said, 5000km (~3000 miles) is a short interval for modern oils and engines. If you don't have one, find an owner's manual for the recommended oil and interval; that may be as much as 10,000km, depending on use. It will probably say every 12 months, if the distance traveled in one year is less than the change interval.
 

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I'm not sure what you mean by not having the money for an oil change. That's one of the cheapest things you'll do to your bike. If you change the oil yourself (which I recommend everyone should do), it is not so expensive. For example, you can get Shell Rotella T6, one gallon of a full synthetic oil, for about $22.00 US at many locations. An oil filter is about $8.00. It is always good to change the oil real soon on a purchased bike as you don't know what the seller used regardless of what he says. If you need to purchase an oil pan and funnel, those are one time items that you'll use for years. An owner's manual will tell how much to use and what to do or a U-Tube video can show you how it's done.

For most riders, one or two changes per year is usually enough. Compare that to your insurance, license, and other possible costs along with new tires every couple of years. Be sure to log the date and mileage of your work for reference.

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Shell Rotella conventional oil (15-40) has given good oil reports, as has the official Walmart oil. Can not go much less for oil. Unless in extreme conditions filter change every other oil change is acceptable.
The T6 Rotella becomes black looking very quickly.

Going by good test results posted by owners sending oil out for lab tests. Been using Rotella synthetic 30+ years.
 

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So don't ride it then unless you have money to rebuild it somehow. No, it's not that serious but a oil change doesn't have to cost that much. The PO was using expensive stuff most likely but check the owners manual and replace the oil with the minimum quality and change it sooner. But in all honesty you shouldn't be riding the scoot if you can't afford to care for it per the owners manual. That not at you but anyone thinking of getting into the motorcycle riding hobby whether by need or pleasure. That is just something you must account for. Similar to riding gear. Obviously the PO took care of the machine but it is yours to do as you please.
 

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I change halfway through the manual. If I had to change with 6,000 I would change it to 3.
The important thing is to check the level whenever you drive.
When you check, you can see how the oil is. If it is dirty, burned, etc. So you set the right time to change.
 

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Modern gasoline engines don't contaminate the oil too much and modern oils have good oxidation resistance so they will stay çlear and bright', straw coloured. But oil has additives in it that do the work of protecting your engine and these break down - are sacrificial doing their job.

So do maintain regular engine oil changes. My Suzuki Boulevard M50 had oil changes recommended every 8000 km/5000 miles and I changed both oil and filter at 5000 km/3000 miles. Oil change is the cheapest maintenance you can do on your bike. Maybe change your filter every second oil change but that's a small saving. And do check the oil level in the engine from time to time, I know its a pain balancing the bike and getting down to check the oil level, but it only takes a minute and you can ask a friend before you go out on a ride to hold your bike upright and duck down and its done.

As for the oil you need to use in your Yamaha XT660X, from a quick look on the net it seems that an SAE 10W-40 viscosity grade is required. But that's only half the answer, an oil is described by its viscosity AND its performance. So you'll need an oil meeting one of the latest API 'S' service classifications (API SL, SM or SN) which also has wet clutch antislip protection - ie. meets JASO MA or MA2. Lower viscosity grade passenger car motor oils (PCMOs) often contain a friction modifier to provide greater fuel economy and these cause your wet clutch to slip, so the JASO MA / MA2 classification shows the oil is suitable for wet clutch motorbike applications. The Shell Rotella mentioned above is a diesel engine oil (DEO ) and doesn't contain any friction modifier additive so is able to be used in a wet clutch motorbike application.
 

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In case you can't tell, Kiwi Steve is our resident oil expert.
 

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Here in Brazil people have a way of exchanging and 1,000 in 1,000 km because the bikes of 1970 so foresaw in the manual.
Already in 1977 the most sold motorcycle in the market, previous exchange every 1,500 km.
In the year 2000 the motorcycles already anticipated change every 4,000 and today the bikes foresee exchange to the 6,000 km.
People keep trading 1,000 out of 1,000 because neighborhood mechanics say it's the right thing to do.
But people do not think that in a country without a study like Brazil, mechanics learn the trade with their parents, with the grandparents, carrying, an old and outdated knowledge.
The known in Brazil as "neighborhood mechanic" did not follow the evolution of technology.
 

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In 1971 I ran a 350 twin mostly at red line. changed the oil every 800-1000 miles. Kept the engine internals like new.
Oil in the USA/Europe should be a lot better now.
I have heard oil purchased in Central or South American countries can be counterfeit.
Just a caution.
 

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I have heard oil purchased in Central or South American countries can be counterfeit.
And in China, Indonesia, Pakistan, India, many countries in Africa. I solved a problem with a BIG air compressor in a steel works in Indonesia by showing them their so called genuine MOBIL branded compressor oil was in fact a drum of used engine oil in a counterfeit painted drum.
 

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Oil is cheaper than engines. Remember that.
Learn how to do it yourself and it becomes a minor expense, on my bikes an oil change costs less than 2 tanks of gas and I use an expensive oil, I could easily use Rotella or the equivalent ( which are very good oils) and do it for about the cost of a single tank of gas. Look for a source of inexpensive filters.

I usually ride a lot of highway miles, easy service for oil, so on my every day bike I go to the manufacturer's suggested limit of 2500 miles or a bit more and push it to 3000 but that's it, by then the oil is still clear and light but I'm sure the viscosity is starting to break down, the bike shifts noticeably different and it's time for an oil change, and the oil is noticeably thinner at that point. 94,000 miles and still running like a champ.

My other bikes are newer but from the same manufacturer, they use the same oil but have a different transmission and it shears the oil a lot less, the interval is 5000 on those and the oil still feels fine when changed at that spec. So go by the manufacturers suggestion, they know what their engine and transmission is doing to the oil.

Some newer vehicles have a longer interval, my wife's Scout they specify 10,000 miles on their new synthetic lube but we couldn't bring ourselves to leave it in there that long and changed it around 6000, after the break in change at 600. So the oil had 5400 miles, it still felt fine but was looking dirty.
 

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Almost off topic but for some reason this post about used engine oil reminded me of a funny story worth sharing.

I used to have a very frugal (aka cheap ass) coworker who drove a 15 year old car (an old police car that he bought for $500 bucks with about 150,000 miles on it no less) that leaked or or burned a couple of quarts of oil a day. He ran it on the used oil out of the waste drum at work, when I ragged him about being cheap he pointed out that we used very good oil (Rotella) and they changed it by the manufacturers specs on all the equipment, it might look dirty since a lot of it came out of diesel equipment but it surely had a couple of hundred miles left in it. Of course he never changed the oil, it changed itself, I don't know what he did with the filter, probably nothing knowing him. :)
He retired 10 years ago, last time I talked to him he was still driving that car, it was over 400,000 miles and rusting apart but still running. I guess he wasn't too far off with his oil strategy.


And in China, Indonesia, Pakistan, India, many countries in Africa. I solved a problem with a BIG air compressor in a steel works in Indonesia by showing them their so called genuine MOBIL branded compressor oil was in fact a drum of used engine oil in a counterfeit painted drum.
 

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It's the contaminants in the oil that do all the harm and paper filters catch only the largest particles; even the best filters struggle with anything under 30 micron. The oil itself stays good for a VERY long distance...but the dirt is the problem that forces us to change it out.

My solution:

1. Mobile 1 in the USA routinely offers rebates that can drive a quart of oil down 50% in price.

2. I change the cycle oil every 2500 miles.

3. I pour that used oil through a 1/2 micron filter sock. I built a setup so I could pour in the oil and leave it for a long as necessary to filter through that tight sock.

4. I use that perfectly good used/filtered oil in an old car for 3000 miles.

5. I run the oil from that car (now with 5500 miles on it) through a different 1/2 micron sock and use that oil in my lawn equipment.

6. I filter the oil from my lawn equipment and then burn it in my shops used oil heater.

Done this for longer than I can remember...the socks are on ebay and they're cheap...keep pouring oil through them until they're plugged then switch to a new one...takes many, many, gallons of oil to plug a sock.
 

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Yeah, but don't those socks make your feet black and slippery when you put them on? :grin:

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Back in the 70S I switched my parents 63 Toro Snowbird to 20-50 Golden Spectro. Easier starting was the immediate benefit.
Changed the oil when I thought about it 4-6 years?
Still runs well. Only the carb and belts wore.

Would I treat a motor vehicle like that? No.
 

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Back in the 70S I switched my parents 63 Toro Snowbird to 20-50 Golden Spectro. Easier starting was the immediate benefit.
Changed the oil when I thought about it 4-6 years?
Still runs well. Only the carb and belts wore.

Would I treat a motor vehicle like that? No.
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Do you mean you wouldn't wait 4-6 years before changing the oil? Why not? Oil doesn't wear out from age. It wears out from use and contaminates.

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I'd worry a lot about condensation contaminating oil with only occasional usage and a lot of sitting in various temperatures for 5 years. The oil might not be worn out, but it might be 1/2 water.

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Do you mean you wouldn't wait 4-6 years before changing the oil? Why not? Oil doesn't wear out from age. It wears out from use and contaminates.

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I'd worry a lot about condensation contaminating oil with only occasional usage and a lot of sitting in various temperatures for 5 years. The oil might not be worn out, but it might be 1/2 water.
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I've never noticed water in oil containers half full that have been setting around for some time--years even. Where would the new air come from with more moisture if the engine was just setting around? There is only so much humidity in that air and if it condensed, it would probably evaporate back into the air. Or do nothing. The temperature variance day to night wouldn't be very much if it were just setting.

Now I do agree that if the engine was started every two weeks or so (as some people do as they think it's the best way to keep the battery charged), then there would be a whole new set of air conditions in the engine. That would probably contaminate the oil. But I'm thinking like if someone put the bike in storage for 6 months of winter. I don't believe that would do much to increase contaminates like water.

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