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Discussion Starter #1
I've always got a lot of questions that can be easily answered in one or two posts, so I figure it would be easier to just ask them all in one place.

Here's my first one. What's a good, compact, and idiot proof tire plug kit I could add to my bags?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Dang, that thing's a little pricy, but this is probably one of those things I shouldn't skimp on. Piece of mind is worth an extra twenty dollars or so. That's why I added roadside assistance and trip interruption to my insurance.

I had a whole list of questions I wanted to ask, and for some reason the only one I can remember at the moment is "How the hell do you fill up without dripping gas on your tank?" I think I've managed that twice.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
That's what I've been doing, but there's always that one drop that I can't get rid of. Aaand I just realized I can just run my finger over the end of the nozzle to get rid of it.

You see, this is why I ask questions like this. The brain thing just doesn't want to work until after I've made a fool of myself. :p
 

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I rotate the nozzle to point up before removing it from over the fuel tank opening. That usually works.
Okay, I want to know how you rotate the nozzle first if you don't remove it from the hole to begin with? Huh???:confused: Do you lift and turn the bike upside down?
 

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Okay, I want to know how you rotate the nozzle first if you don't remove it from the hole to begin with? Huh???:confused: Do you lift and turn the bike upside down?
Lift the nozzle out of the fill opening and hold it over the opening. Rotate the nozzle 180 degrees, move it past the tank, and hang it up.

I guess if you were really worried, you could grab a windshield towel and hold that over the end of the nozzle while moving it past the tank.
 

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I figured you meant that but that sure isn't what you said.
 

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That's what I've been doing, but there's always that one drop that I can't get rid of. Aaand I just realized I can just run my finger over the end of the nozzle to get rid of it.

You see, this is why I ask questions like this. The brain thing just doesn't want to work until after I've made a fool of myself. :p
I'm the same way...for some reason l have to think out loud in order to get my thoughts straight ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So I'm going to be changing my brake pads today. My manual says that when cleaning the brake assembly, I should only use alcohol or brake cleaner. The tutorial video I watched says that brake cleaner is too strong and I should use soap and water. Which is it?
 

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I've never heard brake cleaner isn't good to use on brakes. Is that a new thing dealing with ABS brakes or DOT 5 fluid maybe?
 

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Brake cleaner....no worries, no residue either. I would be concerned about leaving residue with soap and water. Though I guess on the rare occasion when I wash the bike that's what I use.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
I've never heard brake cleaner isn't good to use on brakes. Is that a new thing dealing with ABS brakes or DOT 5 fluid maybe?
No, I think the idea is that brake cleaner is for use on the rotor, and that if you use it on the assembly it'll eat at the seals. Here's the video in question.

 

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Discussion Starter #16
Also, is it normal for a bike to be harder to push when it's in gear with the clutch pulled than when it's in neutral?
 

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Brake cleaner is designed to use on all parts of the brake system and will not damage the seals. The guy in the video is confused, or just plain ignorant.
 

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Also, is it normal for a bike to be harder to push when it's in gear with the clutch pulled than when it's in neutral?
Depends on the bike and it's clutch system, as well as how well the clutch is adjusted. With a bike that has some miles on it since it's last clutch service, yes, it can be normal for it to be harder to push then when in neutral. It's not a big deal unless the bike becomes VERY hard to push with the clutch in.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Cool, thanks for the help.

With this particular bike, it's only hard to push if it's been sitting. I assume that's because at that point it's not lubricated. When that happens, I have to rock it back and forth to break it free. But if I've been riding, it's not appreciably harder than neutral.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Okay, please tell me that it is not normal to need a full can of brake cleaner and a couple hours to clean one of the brake caliper assemblies. Please tell me that this is just the result of previous owners not doing any cleaning when they change the brake pads, or that I just haven't learned the essential trick to quick cleaning. I don't think I could do this every time I go through a set of brakes. If this wasn't my first time seriously messing around with the brakes, I would've disassembled the whole thing and just let it sit in a bucket of cleaner overnight. I still didn't manage to remove all the crud caked onto the pistons, only most of it. I didn't even bother with anything else.

The worst part is, I know I'm not going to own this bike long enough to reap the benefits of doing a thorough cleaning, and the next owner probably isn't ever going to know or care.
 
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