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Recently picked up an 05 Suzuki S40 for 500$, bone stock until I replaced the broken petcock with a raptor 660. now that I have it able to be run it wont start. I either get a really weak crank of the starter or it just clicks once and turns the lights off on the bike. I would really appreciate some insight. First bike, but work on cars.
 

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Battery? Check it and get a trickle charger. Make sure the battery is good. It make a huge difference on a bike.
 

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re

I had it charged at autozone the other day and had the same problem. and also should I go with li ion or lead acid?
 

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Even the cheapest lead acid battery should start the bike no problem. Did they confirm the battery is good?

If the battery is good the next culprit to check is the battery cables then the starter itself. A bad starter relay could also be the culprit
 

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This was stolen from a Wadenelson Post.

Admins: Maybe we should make this a sticky?

DIAGNOSING NO CRANK

VOLTAGE DROP TESTING STARTING CIRCUITS

Ok, ok, here's the cut and paste requested....

>*ridername* , you need to either diagnose, or have someone diagnose your starter (no crank) problem rather than throwing part$ at it. Sometimes you can get lucky, but most times you'll end up buying $$part$$ you don't need.

Do you know how to use a multi-meter to check voltage? Start by checking the battery. A fully charged battery is essential to all testing. You should have 12.6 volts or more. 12.3 volts is a 50% discharged battery.

You cannot trust ANY electrical testing performed UNLESS the battery is fully charged, so if necessary, stop right now and charge it.

When the bike is running, and above idle, it should show 13.8 volts or above --- alternator output has to be at least 1.2 volts above battery voltage to force it to charge..) (measured at battery terminals)

Loose or corroded battery terminals and main ground strap cause all sorts of problems. Check them, clean them if they're corroded. Tighten them if they're loose. Remove any paint from beneath frame ground connections.

On cars, I have seen what APPEARED to be perfectly pristine battery terminals only to remove the cable and see a layer of white corrosion between the post and the cable. Battery wouldn't charge properly, ordered a brand new $300 "Toyota" battery due to SYMPTOMS of a bad battery

Next, check the voltage at the starter WHILE cranking. It should be above 9.0V

Watching the headlights dim on a car WHILE cranking is a quick and dirty way to assess battery condition.

If it won't crank, then try hotwiring from B+ (battery positive terminal) to the start terminal on the solenoid --- be sure bike is in neutral!) If it cranks, then the problem is in your ignition switch, starter switch, fuses, etc.

If it doesn't crank, you could have a bad solenoid or a bad starter. At that point I usually take the starter off and test it on the bench with a car battery and pair of jumper cables. Or take it down to the auto repair store for testing on their machine.

Some older bikes have external solenoids, some the solenoid is built into the starter itself. ??? True or False, Angel?

Voltage DROPPING is the right technique to determine if your problem is in your starter switch, ignition switch, wiring, fusing, etc.

Put your meter black lead on B-
Put your meter red lead on the start terminal on the solenoid.

Now press the starter switch (ignition must be on, kill switch, neutral, etc...)

Lets say you only see 7 volts. You've got a voltage DROP of 5.6 volts! 7V might not be enough to pull in the solenoid.

So you backtrack, trace the wire from the start terminal back to the starter switch. At the output of the starter switch you test voltage again, and it's STILL only 7 volts.

So the wire from the start switch to the solenoid is ok

Now probe the OTHER side of the start switch --- wait, youve got 12.5 volts!

So your starter switch is worn out, contacts, dirty, whatever, and putting a 5 volt voltage drop in your start circuit.

Take the switch apart, if you can, and see if you can clean the contacts inside it with a wire brush,etc. Reassemble and test.

If it's not the starter switch, then you need to backtrack to the ignition switch, etc. until you find the:

damaged wire
corroded connector
dirty contacts
corroded fuse holder
loose connection..

That's causing the problem. YOu probably need to get on the Internet and download a schematic, so you can see how your starter gets power:

for example, your bike's start circuit may be;

battery to main fuse
main fuse to ignition switch
ignition switch to starter switch
starter switch to neutral safety relay
NS relay to starter solenoid...

If your starter AND starter solenoid aren't getting at least 12.3 volts off a 12.6 battery then you've got to find the cause of the voltage drop.


Angel, I really DONT understand common motorcycle starter relays/solenoids, whether they're car-like, or a relay with multiple inputs (kickstand, run/stop switch), solenoid integral with starter or separate..... I'm clueless how the MAJORITY of bikes wire up their starting circuits so I'm hesitant to dive into telling folks how to diagnose no-cranks UNTIL I learn a bit more in that area.

Maybe I can supply the THEORY on voltage dropping and you could "tune up" the article to cover more practical aspects of common motorcycle relay/solenoid wiring, add some pictures?

then make it a "Diagnosing No Crank" sticky? with some additional review/tuning by Uncle Crusty and a few others?
 

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To be honest, any time that I have had the "click" when trying to start a bike, it's always been the battery. Depending where the bike is located, if a battery has froze, even after charging as soon as a load is applied it dies almost instantly.
Do you know what the condition of the battery was when you purchased the bike?
 

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The battery could be fully charged, but could still have a bad cell in it. My Suzuki is very picky about starting on a battery that is not fully charged.

Another possibility, and I could be off the mark, could be that the timing is off. I don't know if anyone has done any repairs on it that would require having to set the timing again, but if it was set at even a hair off, it will bind up and almost sound like a dead battery (it may eventually start if it's just a hair off, but if it's way off, you won't get that sucker to fire no matter how hard you try).
 

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The battery could be fully charged, but could still have a bad cell in it. My Suzuki is very picky about starting on a battery that is not fully charged.

Another possibility, and I could be off the mark, could be that the timing is off. I don't know if anyone has done any repairs on it that would require having to set the timing again, but if it was set at even a hair off, it will bind up and almost sound like a dead battery (it may eventually start if it's just a hair off, but if it's way off, you won't get that sucker to fire no matter how hard you try).
That's totally a possibility. When I was rebuilding a dirtbike DOHC, if I was off one tooth, the bike was a huge pain to kick over. I could only imagine if it was off any more than that.
Good catch.
 
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