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Frankly, Night riding scares the crap out of me. Mainly because oncoming traffic blinds me as too looking far down the road to avoid any hazards or animals. Driving a car or truck is different because if you hit a deer or big tire or cinder brick in the road, it prolly isn't going to kill you.
Am I the only one??
 

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Frankly, Night riding scares the crap out of me. Mainly because oncoming traffic blinds me as too looking far down the road to avoid any hazards or animals. Driving a car or truck is different because if you hit a deer or big tire or cinder brick in the road, it prolly isn't going to kill you.
Am I the only one??
I live in Vegas, so there are times for short rides that are fine as it's lit up here, even in the suburbs, like daylight. I'll also come home from a long trip as it's getting dark, it's fairly safe on our freeway. However, two lane roads, outside of the city I try to avoid. There are a lot of big animals here in the rural areas, such as wild horses, sheep, burro etc. Too dangerous.


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First if no cars are traveling my direction, I slow down considerably. More time to react to anything roadwise. It also buys your eyes time to readjust from oncoming headlight. However if cars are traveling my direction, I pull up tighter on their tails. Not too close but too far. A car can protect you from a variety of circumstances, that would otherwise be yours to contend with.
These techniques have served me quite well. I don't believe that I could count all the times I avoided real problems, this way.
 

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When I have good bike lighting (higher output/auxiliary/whatever) I prefer to separate myself from the cars so i can run the flame-throwers and not bother other vehicles, but if I have to run standard low-beams, I'm with scooterduder -- let the bigger vehicles run interference... but it is for sure you have to maintain a good alertness at night... no more alert than daytime than daytime defensive riding, but a different kind when watching for critters... I've ridden a gazillion miles at night, but it is certainly an acquired taste...
 

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I can only tell you how I feel about it.
Riding in the city, not a big problem, I can see quite well in a built up area with street lights.
The bike I rode many years ago had a 6 volt electrical system and a virtually useless headlight. I didn’t like riding rural roads at night, I just couldn’t see very well.

I have ridden this bike at night, I go a bit slower. It’s got a very good headlight.
Maybe it’s due to living in a rural area. I am very used to driving at night. On narrow dark roads with lots of wildlife.
So long as my head light is good and I can see. I’m feel ok.
Actually there are some things I like about riding at night. particularly when it’s small twisty roads.
You know when on coming traffic is coming before you see it.
Dusk and dawn are when I find it hardest to spot critters. Also tends to be when they come out.
Other thing I like about night, I do see more critters. I am probably strange but I enjoy seeing critters.
I can spot them, eyes glow, scan the shoulders and watch your speed. If you think you see something roll of the throttle and be ready to stop. Odds are good it will step, run or even jump out in front of you. If you spot one there one there’s often another. Particularly if it’s female.

I’ve only hit an animal once, I was riding home from work on my push bike, my light died. It was a very dark night I was going down a step hill quite slowly, I only knew where the road was because I could see the sky above the trees,
I hit a critter and almost went over the bars,
No clue what it was, it was mighty pissed off, it growled and hissed and took off into the woods, I never did see it.m:)
 

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I used to ride every morning in the dark and 50% of the time in fog. It was unnerving to start with but necessity overcomes a lot. I lost count on how many owls I dodged. Those things are huge when they pull up right at your windshield. Another rider wasn’t as lucky as I was and hit one. Took him right out and into the hospital. So yes, it’s dangerous on yet another level of riding. I always figured if it was my time, so be it and didn’t worry about it. Did my best to avoid critters but it really clears your mind off the little things that might be going crazy in your life. Refreshing I guess would be a way to look at it.
 

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I will not ride at night and haven't for many years. I live in a rural area with lots of deer and other critters that are out at night. I also don't like not being able to clearly see the road surface for stuff like gravel, sand and oil. If I lived in a city I might not have a problem with night riding.
 

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I don't even like driving a car at night, where I lived it was country and you never knew when a deer would pop up. Now where I live, still country but but not as open and absolutely no reaction time for the deer
 

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Nightfly
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Deer in this area are a huge problem especially in rutting season. There are certain roads that riders who live here know not to ride after the sun goes down. But there are always those times when it is necessary and that is when you must be on high alert. Going fast on back country roads around here at night is hazardous to your health. they can easily take you out or worse...
 

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Ace Tuner
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I used to do all night rides when my eyes were younger. I knew some areas where traffic would be light, not many deer and there are stretches where a guy can tuck in and let the throttle hand 'slip a little'. Lol (For miles).
Then in the more populated areas you get to see all of the strange beings that only come out at night.
Not scared of the dark...

S F
 

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I just got back into riding last year on a 1983 Maxim 750. The headlight is not the best and I hated riding at night. I live in a small town surrounded by farm land with few street lights, it gets real dark. I found that it is amazing what a properly aimed headlight can do. Most people adjust brakes, tire pressure, suspension ect but never think about the headlight. The proper adjustment makes a HUGE difference and must be done with your weight on the bike. Proper adjustment and use of the high beam more often than I would ever use it in a car has made all the difference to my comfort level with night riding. Still enjoy day riding more but I don't hate night riding anymore.
 

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Being concerned with night riding is certainly not unusual. Its easy to notice that there are a lot more bikes on the road in the daytime than there are at night. I do find that as I am getting older, my night vision is not as good as it once was, so I avoid night riding as much as possible. If I am on a long road trip, I try to stop for the night before it is actually dark. And if it is raining, then I do not ride at night at all. Not only is visibility dangerously compromised during a night ride in the rain, but my being visible to car and truck drivers is also greatly compromised. Years ago I lost a friend who was riding home from work on a rainy night and it seems try to ride right through what he thought was a dark puddle on the road, which turned out to be a big pothole filled with water. He lost control and was killed in the impact. My advice to you is to ride only when you feel comfortable doing so. Over time you will feel more comfortable with night riding, but it will never be as safe as daytime riding.
 

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I like riding at night and have done a lot of all-night rides.
In the summer its cooler and of course a lot less traffic. Going through Vegas at midnight and going through Chicago or Atlanta at 3:00 am is less stressful and saves a lot of time.
A good headlight helps, I have been using HID and LED headlights for the past 10 years.
 

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I had LED headlights on both bikes and it makes a world of difference. That being said I prefer to ride in the daylight. If I need to I will ride in the dark and in the rain.
 

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I think anyone that has flown in to Atlanta at night would agree. It's the darkest city you have ever seen.
We don't need no stinkin' street lights
 

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Like others here, I rode more at night in my younger, better vision days. One thing I suspect hasn't changed is night time riding will get you more bug splatters than day time riding.

Maybe I should add, if you ride outside of town at night you'll get more bug splatters. I don't know about bigger towns, in my younger, night time riding days (days?), a cross town ride was only 2 or 3 miles long. :)

(But it was twice that distance just getting to town.)
 
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