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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone!! I’m a new girl rider! I’m having a hard time mastering my stopping. I don’t know why, i think I psyched myself into thinking I can’t. Any tips on how I can overcome this? I’m currently looking for a one on one instructor. Please feel free to reach out! I’m in Cali!
 

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Welcome from northeast Ohio.

What bike are you riding? What kind of instruction have you had so far? And what exactly are the problems you're having with stopping? There are plenty of folks here who can give sound advice.
 

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Welcome to the forum. The idea is to keep the bike upright when you stop. Can you flatfoot it? That helps a lot.
 

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Welcome from Arkansas. After a couple of medical issues, I also had trouble with my stops. More riding is what helped me because anytime you start, at some point you got to stop. An empty parking lot could be your friend.

There are some very good riders on here and you will get some good advice. I'll probably be checking back to see what they say! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Welcome from northeast Ohio.

What bike are you riding? What kind of instruction have you had so far? And what exactly are the problems you're having with stopping? There are plenty of folks here who can give sound advice.
Welcome from northeast Ohio.

What bike are you riding? What kind of instruction have you had so far? And what exactly are the problems you're having with stopping? There are plenty of folks here who can give sound advice.
Hello! I took a safety course, I have my license. I have a BMW G310R as my starter bike ☺. I was being told I was short which I am 5 feet tall. When I was practicing my significant other kept saying it was my shoes (I bough riding boots with some heel) to help me have a little more height, which I believe it helps a lot. I think I psyched myself into thinking I can’t stop to the point that now I feel confused as to how to stop and when to put my foot down. I can take off easily but when it comes to stopping I can’t seem to figure it out and end up tipping and falling 😬. Trust me when I say the falls don’t bother me (in a good way haha). Thanks for all your advice guys!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Welcome from Arkansas. After a couple of medical issues, I also had trouble with my stops. More riding is what helped me because anytime you start, at some point you got to stop. An empty parking lot could be your friend.

There are some very good riders on here and you will get some good advice. I'll probably be checking back to see what they say! ;)
yes! I’ve been going to a parking lot but with my husband who also rides however I feel like he is always getting on to me and frustrates me and I just end up quitting my practice. I thoughtit would be less pressure to practice with him but it’s more stressful.
 

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Do the brakes feel like they are grabbing when you put just a little pressure on the pedal or lever? Are you using both brakes or just one when you are stopping? If you're already not doing it, when you are in a parking lot, trying coming to a stop using just the rear brake. Get used to doing that and then start exploring how much front brake you can use.

Sorry your husband is like he is, as a husband I sometimes (sometimes?) don't communicate what I am trying to say to my wife very well, specially the third or forth time. This might be a situation in which a friend that rides might be better suited to helping you. But I don't know you or your husband and don't want to insinuate anyone is doing anything wrong.
 

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What is sequence of events that occurs and which stages are you having trouble with?

I'm 5'3" with 28" inseam and I ride bikes with 32" seat height. I even raised back end on my race Ninja 250 to 32" for more ground clearance. This is what I do coming to stop, varies slightly depending upon if it's traffic light and I plan on moving again, or it I'm stopping to park for good.

STOPPING AT LIGHT

1. See light turning yellow

2. release throttle, braking gently

3. downshift to lower gears as speeds decrease

4. by 5 mph, I shift into 1st gear and prepare to stop

5. squeeze clutch, let go throttle completely

6. gradually slow with front-brake

7. at 1 mph; I put out my left foot

8. at 0.5 mph, I scoot off left side with only right butt-cheek on seat

9. 0 mph, bike stopped, I INTENTIONALLY lean it slightly to left and put left foot down so I KNOW for sure which way bike will lean. Trying to tippy-toe both sides with bike vertical is EXTREMELY unstable because you don't have traction to push it with toes when it leans either way unpredictably. And you won't have enough time to get one foot or other flat on ground to have traction to push against bike to keep it from falling further.

10. Bike is stopped, left foot firmly and fully planted on ground with knee slightly bent (or knee locked if that's more stable for you).

Bike angle controlled by left-leg and right butt-cheek . I can push left leg to adjust bike angle, but it's always leaning to left slightly. Forms stable triangle with left leg on one side and bike on right side. I KNOW it won't tip over other way unexpectedly because I MADE it lean to left intentionally.

Some people feel more comfortable putting their foot on ground between steps 8-9 when bike is barely moving and dragging foot alightly. That way they don't have to do too many things at once when bike comes to complete stop.

You may also want to try shifting into neutral instead of 1st to not have to worry about keeping clutch squeezed. In which case reverse sides and slide off right side of bike with left butt-cheek on seat and leaning bike to right. That way you can shift into 1st gear to get moving again.

Either way, what's important is:

A. one foot or other firmly planted with weight on it so you can push off that foot to control bike

B. bike INTENTIONALLY leaned in direction YOU choose so you can control it with foot on ground.

Try different things, mix it up in different orders. you'll find something that works! Good luck! :)

Nothing's worse than bike falling away from you and nothing you can push against to stand it up. I usually lean bike against my hip to move around in garage. One time, it was too vertical and started leaning away from me. I hung on and trying pulling on it to prevent fall. Nope, it was going over and ended pulling me over with it! Flipped me over and tossed me halfway across garage!!! :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Do the brakes feel like they are grabbing when you put just a little pressure on the pedal or lever? Are you using both brakes or just one when you are stopping? If you're already not doing it, when you are in a parking lot, trying coming to a stop using just the rear brake. Get used to doing that and then start exploring how much front brake you can use.

Sorry your husband is like he is, as a husband I sometimes (sometimes?) don't communicate what I am trying to say to my wife very well, specially the third or forth time. This might be a situation in which a friend that rides might be better suited to helping you. But I don't know you or your husband and don't want to insinuate anyone is doing anything wrong.
I'm trying to use both brakes, I will do as you advice, thank you. Yes for some reason getting taught by my husband is too much pressure for me. Im hoping that a friend my husband and I have will be able to help me. I agree that sometimes that is easier which I am glad my husband is okay with someone else helping me.

I've heard that is better to try to stop with your left foot, is that true? and if so, will it make it difficult for me to take off again since i have to change gears? or do I just switch feet after i stop to be able to take off and change gears? What is your advice?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
What is sequence of events that occurs and which stages are you having trouble with?

I'm 5'3" with 28" inseam and I ride bikes with 32" seat height. I even raised back end on my race Ninja 250 to 32" for more ground clearance. This is what I do coming to stop, varies slightly depending upon if it's traffic light and I plan on moving again, or it I'm stopping to park for good.

STOPPING AT LIGHT

1. See light turning yellow

2. release throttle, braking gently

3. downshift to lower gears as speeds decrease

4. by 5 mph, I shift into 1st gear and prepare to stop

5. squeeze clutch, let go throttle completely

6. gradually slow with front-brake

7. at 1 mph; I put out my left foot

8. at 0.5 mph, I scoot off left side with only right butt-cheek on seat

9. 0 mph, bike stopped, I INTENTIONALLY lean it slightly to left and put left foot down so I KNOW for sure which way bike will lean. Trying to tippy-toe both sides with bike vertical is EXTREMELY unstable because you don't have traction to push it with toes when it leans either way unpredictably. And you won't have enough time to get one foot or other flat on ground to have traction to push against bike to keep it from falling further.

10. Bike is stopped, left foot firmly and fully planted on ground with knee slightly bent (or knee locked if that's more stable for you).

Bike angle controlled by left-leg and right butt-cheek . I can push left leg to adjust bike angle, but it's always leaning to left slightly. Forms stable triangle with left leg on one side and bike on right side. I KNOW it won't tip over other way unexpectedly because I MADE it lean to left intentionally.

Some people feel more comfortable putting their foot on ground between steps 8-9 when bike is barely moving and dragging foot alightly. That way they don't have to do too many things at once when bike comes to complete stop.

You may also want to try shifting into neutral instead of 1st to not have to worry about keeping clutch squeezed. In which case reverse sides and slide off right side of bike with left butt-cheek on seat and leaning bike to right. That way you can shift into 1st gear to get moving again.

Either way, what's important is:

A. one foot or other firmly planted with weight on it so you can push off that foot to control bike

B. bike INTENTIONALLY leaned in direction YOU choose so you can control it with foot on ground.

Try different things, mix it up in different orders. you'll find something that works! Good luck! :)

Nothing's worse than bike falling away from you and nothing you can push against to stand it up. I usually lean bike against my hip to move around in garage. One time, it was too vertical and started leaning away from me. I hung on and trying pulling on it to prevent fall. Nope, it was going over and ended pulling me over with it! Flipped me over and tossed me halfway across garage!!! :eek:
Let me start off by saying I wish i was 5'3! I want to believe my riding would be so much easier haha.. Im 5 feet, I lowered my bike 2 inches, Im starting with a BMW G310R. Wow thank you so much for the step by step tutorial. I will definitely be trying again until Im able to stop comfortably. This definitely helps me know that i can master my stops :)

I naturally stop with my right, another thing that is bothering me is, like you say come to 0mph and lean the bike, I feel like i don't know which side is going to lean so thats why i end up tipping and falling, do you lean it to the side you want it to lean? or do you wait and see which way its going to lean? Thank you so much for your advice and tips!!!

So far I've fallen 3 times trying to stop so I hope that was it haha .. I'm glad it doesn't stop me from wanting to ride :)
 

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You're most welcome! You're doing awesome getting back on!! Great attitude!!

No need to wonder about which way IT is going to lean. You MAKE it do what you want. By sticking your foot out and scooting your butt off one side, you shift centre-of-gravity of bike+rider system to that side and it with lean that way.

So be intentional:

1. Think to yourself, "I'm going to make it lean to RIGHT at his stop damnit!" Then make it happen with ...

2. stick out your right foot, preparing to touch down.

3. slide butt to right, leaving only left butt cheek on seat as bike stops

4. bike will lean to right, your right foot touches down, yay!!!

If's your body-weight off to one side that pulls bike that way. You can practice #2 & #3 riding around in parking lots without even stopping. Relax arms and wiggle elbows, you don't have to be locked to bike & seat. Get used to relaxing on bike and moving around.

Maybe do exercises where you stick out one foot. Then pull it back in and stick out the other one. Then slide one butt cheek off for couple seconds, then slide back on and then slide to other side. Finally finish the sequence with actual stop:

1. put foot out
2. slide butt off that side as well
3. lean bike over gently so foot touches
4. touchdown!!!


BTW, did you get bike with 30.3" seat height? Then lowered bike 2" more? That makes it 4" lower than my bikes, so we should have similar experience with climbing on and off. :)
 

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I'm 5' 7" so have no problems flat footing or stopping my bike and can't really relate; but just in reading this I wonder wouldn't it make more sense to purposefully lean your bike to the left when you're stopped? Danno's step by step makes a lot of sense and he mentioned being in first gear when completing the stop. If you do that, no worry about changing gears when you're first pulling away from a full stop, so you don't need your left foot up on the peg. But if you're taking your right foot off preparing for a stop when you're going to lean to the right, you're losing the ability to use that rear brake as part of the stopping process. Just a thought.
I started riding again this year after a 30 year break, so I've had my share of awkward stops and starts and corners. It really helped to practice slow in a parking lot to get the old skills back. I second the recommendation to find one and put in some practice time. Alone, if you can pick up your bike without your husband's help. That way you can concentrate on your process without distraction. Good luck!
 

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Welcome! We have (had? ) a bike like yours a training fleet where I teach occasionally. The regular coaches suggested saving that bike for more experienced students, but I don't remember why. I vaguely remember riding it and it wasn't as beginner-friendly as the other bikes. I seem to recall it being in the wide side because of the tank. That could be the issue moreso than the height. (I'm 5'2" in boots, 28" inseam.) Narrower bikes make it easier to touch the ground.
I second the "tripod" technique described above, with your left foot. That's how I've had to stop most of the bikes I've owned. You need to be in first gear in case you have to make a quick getaway.
 

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Regarding husbands (or wives) as trainers ... in NRA rifle coaching school and other shooting coaching training I took the coaching teachers always insist that the husband is the worst choice as a trainer - too much other interpersonal stuff gets in the way. Find a coach you are not married to. Heck, try several until you find one that connects with you well.

It is not that either are flawed, but student and teacher is a special relationship. You need to find one that fits you.

I prefer to stop in first gear, clutch in, leaning to the left. It is so ingrained I doubt I could put my right foot down even if I decided to try it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Welcome! We have (had? ) a bike like yours a training fleet where I teach occasionally. The regular coaches suggested saving that bike for more experienced students, but I don't remember why. I vaguely remember riding it and it wasn't as beginner-friendly as the other bikes. I seem to recall it being in the wide side because of the tank. That could be the issue moreso than the height. (I'm 5'2" in boots, 28" inseam.) Narrower bikes make it easier to touch the ground.
I second the "tripod" technique described above, with your left foot. That's how I've had to stop most of the bikes I've owned. You need to be in first gear in case you have to make a quick getaway.
yes.. I think you’re right about the tank, maybe I end up feeling intimidated by the size of it and somehow believe I won’t be able to stop?It could be. I’m going again to practice this week so please wish me luck! I’m stuck with this bike for now but I don’t think it’s the gas tank is somewhere between “not knowing when to bring the foot down” “do I wait for the bike to lean? What if I don’t know which way it’s going to lean? Or maybe I’m forgetting the process of stoping. Can you remind me the proper technique when coming to a stop. I press the clutch while breaking slowly with both brakes??
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Regarding husbands (or wives) as trainers ... in NRA rifle coaching school and other shooting coaching training I took the coaching teachers always insist that the husband is the worst choice as a trainer - too much other interpersonal stuff gets in the way. Find a coach you are not married to. Heck, try several until you find one that connects with you well.

It is not that either are flawed, but student and teacher is a special relationship. You need to find one that fits you.

I prefer to stop in first gear, clutch in, leaning to the left. It is so ingrained I doubt I could put my right foot down even if I decided to try it.
Is the foot more of a preference thing? I naturally bring my right foot down.
 

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If it feels good, do it. I am stuck having to switch sides if I decide I want to move the gear selector into or out of neutral. Your habit eliminates the use of the rear brake, but at slowing to a stop speed that is no loss. Right foot is a good choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I'm 5' 7" so have no problems flat footing or stopping my bike and can't really relate; but just in reading this I wonder wouldn't it make more sense to purposefully lean your bike to the left when you're stopped? Danno's step by step makes a lot of sense and he mentioned being in first gear when completing the stop. If you do that, no worry about changing gears when you're first pulling away from a full stop, so you don't need your left foot up on the peg. But if you're taking your right foot off preparing for a stop when you're going to lean to the right, you're losing the ability to use that rear brake as part of the stopping process. Just a thought.
I started riding again this year after a 30 year break, so I've had my share of awkward stops and starts and corners. It really helped to practice slow in a parking lot to get the old skills back. I second the recommendation to find one and put in some practice time. Alone, if you can pick up your bike without your husband's help. That way you can concentrate on your process without distraction. Good luck!
i want to practice on my own but I’m not able to pick up my bike on my own unfortunately, that’s what’s keeping me from trying to practice more in my own. I’m currently looking to hire someone for one on one. I hope to find one ASAP. Thank you for sharing and I’m glad you’re riding again!
 
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