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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Alright guys and gals I have no motorcycle mechanical experience but have had lots working on my jeep. My Mother bought what she tells me is a 1997 Suzuki vz800 Marauder with I forget how many miles. She got it for $800 off her friends friend who needed it out his garage. I'll be doing all the work to it for her. Let me start off by saying the bike has sat up for atleast a year and his dog chewed the front brake line and broke it. So today we brought the bike to the house and I replaced the brake line with one she ordered online but haven't added fluid yet. Their is alittle gas left in the tank, any tips of removing it as I'm sure it's really bad after sitting up for a year. What I want to know is what and how do I replace everything? I know and want to replace all fluids on the bike. Is there anything else I need to replace while I'm at it? Also how do I clean the carburetor? I'm sure it needs a cleaning. She does need to order tires for it soon at these are starting to dry rot and split. thanks for all the help guys!
 

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You can connect a small diameter tube to the rear carb drain and open the drain screw to let the fuel out, with the petcock set to reserve. It will be slow, but nearly all will come out, and you don't need to disconnect anything. While you're at it, drain the front carb. All that may be needed for cleaning them is to set the petcock to off, put fuel system cleaner in the tank to make a strong mixture, fill with gas, and rock the bike. Then open the petcock to fill the carbs with the mix and let soak a couple days. I use Seafoam for this, but there are others just as good. If the passages are just gunked up, but not really blocked, starting and running the tank through should clean them up; a second tankful with cleaner would be a good follow-up.

Make sure the clutch is adjusted properly, and check the brake pads and wear indicator on the rear brake. This engine runs on battery power, so make sure those connections are clean and tight; always disconnect the negative first, and connect it last, so no shorts on the plus side. Maybe have the battery load tested.
 

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Also pay attention to the engine. If it is unused for a year, better to flush the oil and replace it with a fresh one. Check the SP, fuel line and the battery.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
You can connect a small diameter tube to the rear carb drain and open the drain screw to let the fuel out, with the petcock set to reserve. It will be slow, but nearly all will come out, and you don't need to disconnect anything. While you're at it, drain the front carb. All that may be needed for cleaning them is to set the petcock to off, put fuel system cleaner in the tank to make a strong mixture, fill with gas, and rock the bike. Then open the petcock to fill the carbs with the mix and let soak a couple days. I use Seafoam for this, but there are others just as good. If the passages are just gunked up, but not really blocked, starting and running the tank through should clean them up; a second tankful with cleaner would be a good follow-up.

Make sure the clutch is adjusted properly, and check the brake pads and wear indicator on the rear brake. This engine runs on battery power, so make sure those connections are clean and tight; always disconnect the negative first, and connect it last, so no shorts on the plus side. Maybe have the battery load tested.
thanks bud I'll try to get on that this weekend if I have time. I'll bring the load tester home from work to test it. I know I need to change the oil just I know when it was done, add brake fluid, and maybe flush the radiator.
 

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Might be better to draw all the brake fluid from the reservoir - don't move the lever so you don't put air in the lines - then fill with fresh and bleed the fresh fluid down to the caliper. It should be changed every two years, and probably hasn't been.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Might be better to draw all the brake fluid from the reservoir - don't move the lever so you don't put air in the lines - then fill with fresh and bleed the fresh fluid down to the caliper. It should be changed every two years, and probably hasn't been.
their is no brake fluid in it as I had to put a new brake line on since the old one was chewed up by a dog
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
well now that I have seen the bike in person my mother was wrong and the bike only had 16,508 miles not 16,000.
 

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I apologize for doing that. I needed to start a new post and for some reason i needed to post 3 times. doesnt make much sense to me...
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
hahaa it's all good gives my thread a bump and I agree that's totally stupid you need to post 3 times.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
going to change the chain and sprocket tomorrow and I need to know how you guys lift your bikes! needs to be lifted enough to take the rear tire off the bike
 

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That's what I use. But if you have the money, a Pit Bill or J & S brand are top of the line. Some folks use a lift table. I'm considering adding one but having trouble justifying more money for just occasional use.
 

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Probably to late with this info, but when ever I have an engine thats been setting for a while I add a shot of ATF (automatic transmission fluid) to each cylinder. May or sometimes not let it then set for a few days depending on the engine. That will help remove carbon from the rings and add lubricant to the top end. You will want to turn the engine over a few time to before replacing the plugs to prevent any chance of Hydro lock.
 
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