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Hello!
I'm Katelyn and i'm 19 yrs old. Owning a motorcycle has always been a dream of mine. I plan on getting my permit and license/ endorsement this summer. Bike wise I have no idea! So please share your advise on anything that will help me! I am looking at a Harley XL883N- Iron 883. I have heard this is great bike for beginners if you have any insight on that as well it would be much appreciated! Thank you!
 

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Swamp Rat Rider
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I really don't think a Sportster is the best choice for a Beginner Bike but if it's what you want go for it .. Was the First Ride I purchased in 1970 a 1969 XLCH .. Back then was no Motorcycle Permit/Endorsement just have a Drivers License and the Cash and Ride it off the Lot ..
 

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Hello!
I'm Katelyn and i'm 19 yrs old. Owning a motorcycle has always been a dream of mine. I plan on getting my permit and license/ endorsement this summer.
Welcome!

Bike wise I have no idea! So please share your advise on anything that will help me! I am looking at a Harley XL883N- Iron 883. I have heard this is great bike for beginners if you have any insight on that as well it would be much appreciated! Thank you!
Don't be in any hurry to buy a bike. Try a few for size. Buy one that is the right size and is
suitable for your intended purpose. Touring, commuting, weekend rides...... Cars have a
huge range of adjustment to suit the individual driver. Seat position, tilt, height, steering wheel
height and so on. Regardless of what size you are, I could probably drive your car and you
could drive mine. Most bikes have little or no adjustment to suit the individual rider.
You need to get one that fits you.

The best advice I can offer is that you invest in rider training. Basic training when you start
riding and more advanced training in the months and years ahead.
 

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Welcome to the Forum:grin:

A Harley Davidson 883 in any model, is a great bike to start on for many reasons, if you feel confident and have the riding skills to handle the little bike.

They are mildly tuned and won't get you in trouble with their easily controlled power band. They are absolutely reliable and the 883 holds its value very well.

My last one was a black 2005 883R, the special series with dual front disks and some other cool features. Mine came from the dealer with the 'Stage 1' Screaming Eagle 'HOP UP' kit installed and it ran very well and sounded like a bike should, like a HARLEY:smile_big:

There are many very clean ones available on the used market, just GOOGLE: "Used Harley Davidson Sportster's for sale" and many bikes will show up.:wink2:

Be careful and get the proper training and practice and ride on rural roads if possible and have fun:smile_big:

Sam:nerd:
 

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Welcome! Lots of people start on an 883 - no worries there.

My personal opinion is to start on something used though as you're likely to drop your bike once or twice while learning. (Everyone does - darn those cones!)

Have fun!
 
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Welcome.
First off get some training, take a class, that's what is most important.
I never rode a Sportster but plenty of people start on them, it's a good choice if it fits you and that's what you want to ride, there are other choices that are just as good and quite possibly less expensive but that's your call. If you find any others that you like ask about them.
Sit on a lot of bikes before you make the purchase if you can, if you have a friend that rides get them involved in your shopping. I suggest that you buy used, you may well dent or scratch your first bike, this hurts less on a used one.
 
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Hello Katelyn Lanz. I am Herrick. Welcome to the Forum. I'm also a new rider. I took a MSF Beginner Rider's Course then bought a Honda Shadow Phantom. It weighs about 542 pounds. I'm 5'8" and somewhere between 160 and 170 pounds. The bike felt like a freakin' tank when I first sat on it but after a while it didn't feel too heavy or powerful. It's been 5 months since I bought it and it looks kinda small now.

I hear those 883s are suitable for beginner riders. Like others said, it's a good idea to try to sit on as many bikes as you can before deciding what to buy. Good luck!
 

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Hi Katelyn it can be very confusing to buy a bike there are so many to choose from and buying second hand is the way to go, a riders course is mandatory I feel if you have never ridden before some people have it others dont and have lots of road rash to prove they cannot ride.
You have to think twice as fast as the average car drive because they do not give a toss about m/cycle riders and as far as push comes to shove they will win every time.
There is a good degree of coordination involved in even getting the bike moving, releasing the clutch whilst giving the bike rev's not to much lifting your foot when you start to move and keeping balance whilst the bike is at low speed as thats when they are most unstable.
Have a friend help you with the bike you want sit on it get them to get ready to stop the bike tipping and take the bike to its tipping point to feel the weight of it to see if you could really stop it falling over (The dealer will probably go grey here)

We have all seen u-tubes novice riders take of with a zillion revs and freeze at the controls I told my wife when teaching her if at any point when your taking off and it gets out of control shut the throttle down so many pour on more revs and just go balistic with terror.
Get good gear a helmet that fits correctly, leather jacket, Kevlar jeans, top notch gloves & riding boots why because bitumen tears your skin off better that an angle grinder trust me when I was 19 riding my Z900 I learnt what happens to squids when the flesh meets the tar.

I hope you get what you want I do not dispespect any bike rider or their chosen m/cycle we are all the same just trying to stay alive amongst mobile lounge rooms whilst enjoying the freedom of riding.
Its horses for courses me I like High performance based machines which I will admit are a pain for touring on (Thats why I have a 1100XX as backup) but get into the twisties and get cranking there is nothing like it.

All the best to you and your future.
 

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Hello and welcome to the forum and to the world of motorcycles!

I will pile on about the value of the MSF course in helping you and your bike survive. It's fun, it gets you a license in most states, and it may well save your life.

The 883 is an awesome bike. Great to start on, great to ride for a long time. As your preferences evolve, it can be modified into just about anything. Or, it is simply great as as stock motorcycle.

I would wait to complete the riding course before buying the bike. The pressure of a brand new motorcycle waiting for you to pass can make the class less fun. Also, many HD dealers will likely give you the class for free if you are serious about buying a bike, so that's a win.
 

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Harley has long had a 're-buy' program for their Sportster line, that assures purchasers of a new Sportster, that within a specified mileage and time limit, the Dealer will take the bike back in trade on a 'Big twin' Harley for the same price that was paid for it originally. I'm sure the caveat is that the bike has to be almost perfect, etc but it's worth looking in too.:grin:

Sam:nerd:
 

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--

A lot of good comments above. Important is taking the riding course before buying a bike, I think. Keep in mind that most all major bike manufacturers make fairly reliable bikes.

One big thing on price is the cool factor. Don't buy your first bike based on how you will look on it or how you think others will think you look on it. That means don't get a Harley unless you want to spend a little more for the name. Since you should be buying used, get a bike based on fitting, age, condition, mileage and prior ownership. You should also take (or have the owner take) the bike to a shop you trust where you will pay for a mechanic to give the bike a thorough go-over before buying.

Better to spend $75. than be sorry for a year or two as most bikes will need some stuff done like oil service or new tires, etc. That way you'll know up front what the real cost will be.

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Hello! I'm Katelyn and i'm 19 yrs old. Bike wise I have no idea! So please share your advise on anything that will help me!
Hi Katelyn, by the age of 19, I'd crashed a bike maybe 50 times...in the grass and dirt...you learn a lot about riding via crashing...but you don't want to learn about crashing/riding on cement and around cars:smile:

I've ridden for 40 years now, and those ~50 crashing lessons in the dirt/grass have kept me alive and well on the streets.

My advice, buy an on/off bike of at least 150cc...fyi, and "on/off" bike is one that's made for both the dirt and streets....ride it carefully on the street to an old gravel pit, the woods, anywhere you can ride and develop the skills to handle two wheels like a pro. An on/off bike is light, fast, and easy to handle; there's just no better way to build the skill you need for the streets.

One the street, on a large bike, I had a car pull right out in front of me from a stop sign. Most people would have t-boned the car and probably died..not me, I instinctively put the bike into a sideways skid and slid sideways right into the side of it. Put a big dent in the car, but I was uninjured...had I hit it head-on? Yikes, I would have been thrown over the car...that life saving skid stop came from all that dirt experience.

Not only is riding off road a great skill builder, it's a TON-O-FUN! Way more of an adrenaline rush than the streets.

Great video on skidding to a stop:

 

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I really don't think a Sportster is the best choice for a Beginner Bike but if it's what you want go for it .. Was the First Ride I purchased in 1970 a 1969 XLCH .. Back then was no Motorcycle Permit/Endorsement just have a Drivers License and the Cash and Ride it off the Lot ..
Scary, ain’t it?! (lol)
 

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"It's a miracle we survived!" Mike quote:smile_big:

I remember teaching owners of Kawasaki 3 cylinder 500's and 750's, how to do 'burn-outs,' right on city streets:grin:

Impressive but in retrospect, Mucho Stupido:surprise:

Sam:angel:
 

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Hearing older tunes makes me wonder just where did music makers get derailed. I wont even listen to stuff being produced today. But I suppose my parents felt the same. Time marches on. Take the good with the bad.
 
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