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Hi guys I got a Honda nighthawk 650. Looking at taking a trip cross country and wondering what the best gear to have. Safety first!! Helmets jackets gloves? Any good ideas? I see a lot of deals on amazon but I have no idea of the quality.
 

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A helmet is a must. Going from state to state, helmet laws change. It's just best to have and wear one. I like my helmet with a dark shield. I used to just wear sunglasses, and I still do fairly often, but on a long trip with just sunglasses, my face would tan all over except around my eyes. Looked kind of funny. Bad part is you have to have a clear shield for rainy weather and after dark, or park it.
If you're going to ride in the rain (best to prepare for it) you'll need a good rainsuit. I like the two piece suits. The bottom of the legs should have some straps that go under your boots to keep the legs from riding up. When the sky starts to look nasty, put the suit on. Don't wait until it starts pouring. There are some nice rainsuits with reflective stripes and whatnots, makes it easier for others to see you.
Some type of leather boot that is over the ankle for foot protection. Lace up boots are okay but be sure to tuck those laces in. They will wrap around brake pedals and gear shifters if not tucked in. Pulling up to a stop sign and falling over because you can't put your foot down, is not cool.
I like fingerless gloves, that's a personal choice, but I have a pair of gauntlets when it gets cool. On a cross country trip, you will run into some "cool" areas. Take a good jacket and layer up if necessary. A rainsuit jacket over your regular coat can really help hold body heat in. A jacket with a zip in liner can be used over a wider temperature range. I like leather but I also have a textile jacket with built in armour.
For cross country travel, you may want to consider adding a windshield to your 650. It makes a lot of difference.
 

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Congratulations on your new purchase!!! :) :)
Well about the gear, I used to shop my gear from the ski bum Coupons.
They have very good collections of bike gears available at discounted price.
Of course, safety should be your top priority
 

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Best thing I ever bought was a full face helmet with a flip down dark visor, it saves so much time and swapping shields when the lighting changes or the sun rises or sets. This makes a big difference on a long ride. Pinlock shields are good too, working like a double pane window they help keep your visor from fogging.

I like to wear water resistant textile gear, I carry real rain gear to wear on the days it's pouring but for showers and sprinkles of rain the textile stuff keeps me dry enough.
 

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Yeah, I have a drop down on my half helmet which plain ruined me. Had to buy another modular with one as well. They work great when your ride changes from sun to your side then head-on into the sun. Or cloudy days where it's dark as can be then bright as can be. Best thing they ever came out with without a doubt.
 

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I forgot about those helmets and my old one has the drop down visor. In my old helmet I could move the visor down just a little bit to block out the sun, but not have to look through it. Left it in the shop and a rat got to it. ?
That's why I got a "new" helmet, (a couple years ago). ?
It never stays in the shop and, couple years ago now, we got a cat that's an excellent mouser! Too bad Mickey!?
 

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My new helmet didn't have the internal visor, no Snell rated helmet does as far as I know. I accepted that when i got it but missed the internal drop down that my old $$50 helmet had. A couple of months later Arai came out with an external dark shield setup, that rotates back over the clear shield, it was the best $100 that I ever spent, I literally use it every day, riding in the dark and if I'm late right into the sunrise going east every morning and into the awful glaring setting sun heading west in the afternoon.
 

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Make provisions to carry lots of water.

Be prepared for bad weather at any time.

Start with new or near new tires.

Keep a good cell phone with great coverage.

If your helmet has a dark insert, make sure you have a clear or yellow one for night riding.

I suggest making motel/ hotel arrangements at realistic mileages so you won't be surprised with the 'No Vacancy' sign when you are dead tired.

Make very sure that you gas up 'early' because stations can be few and far between in rural areas and even on the Interstates.

Have fun and be careful.

Sam:grin:
 

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On a trip to Utah, I was advised to fuel up any time I got near 1/2 tank. I took this advice serious and never had a problem. Well, I did get sick and came back early but I think that was more from not eating as well as I should have. There's a tip! ?
 

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Thanks for the tip! I’m curious though how far I could go on a full tank!
Only safe way to know that is to carry a couple of quarts of fuel and run it till it quits. But that really rather dangerous because you could pick up any trash in the bottom of the tank. Next best is to use math skills and get a good estimate based on you fuel mileage.:nerd: That is a much safer way. Who cares if you can get another 2 miles. I'd rather ride to a gas station versus walk to one and then walk back to the bike that ran out of fuel. Always leave yourself a good buffer.:wink2:
 

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Thanks for the tip! I’m curious though how far I could go on a full tank!
I keep forgetting how far each bike goes. So I stick a piece of masking tape somewhere, and write the numbers on it. The one that goes the least distance, has a broken trip OD. But a red light does come on when it is low.

UK
 

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Honda nighthawk 650 + taking a trip cross country = I'd rethink that plan son...

That is not a "Cross Country" cycle. When I was in my 20's, I took my Nighthawk 550 on a 350 round-trip run....BRUTAL! Every part of me was sore...just terrible..and rain...OMG...nope, nope, nope...

Really, really suggest you start with some small trips...try riding it, at highway speeds, 75 miles out and back and see how you feel. Put your rain (and crash) gear on and go ride it in the rain around your city to get the feel of it; that 550 was super squirrely in the rain.
 

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Ride as long as it's enjoyable. If you're only a few hundred or a thousand miles from home, and each day starts feeling like a terrible chore, just turn around. It's okay to change your mind.
 

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I didn't go cross-country to start with but did make several 1,000 loops traveling around 500 miles then head back home. On a Honda 185 Twinstar. That little bike taught me plenty. I considered going further but decided it was time to step up a size.
 

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The law is changeable state to state, so it is not easy to maintain everything. But you need to a helmet, hand gloves, jacket, shoes, etc. Either you can also use a motorcycle riding earplugs. Best of luck, happy journey.
 

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I agree a 650 is not the best bike to go touring on or traveling cross country, but it can be done and you can have a good time doing it. I traveled cross country, with my wife, on a Kawasaki CSR 650 back in the mid 80's. I've also traveled cross country on a 750 Honda Shadow. I think a lot of it is just mental attitude. If you think its going to be tough, it probably will be. If you think you're going to have fun, you probably will.
We're blessed to live in such a beautiful country, and to me, seeing it from the seat of a motorcycle is one of the best ways to see it. But I also think seeing it from a small plane would be great too! :)
 

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Congrats! Helmet...buy the best you can afford and make sure someone with a tape measure fits it properly to your head. So many riders I see as students of mine are wearing helmets that are ill fitting and most often too large.

Another helpful pice of equipment is a camel back to help keep you hydrated while riding. I noticed that this made a huge difference to my long distance riding in that a sip of water here and there really helped to re-focus as riding can be very dehydrating. Electrolytes can help as well as frequent rest breaks and snacks. Good gear is incredible as well, something that is breathable, waterproof and has vents so that you can layer up and keep a handle on your temperature and comfort level. Sometimes a heated vest/gloves come in very handy :)

Ride safe!!
 
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