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As stated I'm new all around. I just got my first bike about a month and a half ago. I love it! It's a 2005 Suzuki GS500f.

Like in the title though, I do have a problem though. A few weeks ago, I was riding home from work and the bike starts to sputter then stalls. I've only been riding about 2 weeks at this so it took me a minute to pull myself together and think for a moment. It seemed like I was running out of gas and it didn't seem likely but I put the fuel to reserve and it worked just fine. I made it to the gas station to fill up and the tank was half full at least.

This past Thursday, on my way to work, and the same thing happens. Still about a half tank. Works fine on reserve. Sputters and stalls as I'm out of fuel. Any ideas or points would be helpful and very appreiated.

-IM
 

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Id check your fuel line and fuel filter first. Could be clogged. Since its an 05 Im guessing you bought it used. What kind of shape did the old owner keep it in? Did they have regular maintinences recorded?
 

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I don't suppose you could have water in the tank, could you? I had a similar problem when a Chevron station locally watered down their gas to try to get more profit out of it. I read about it in the paper and didn't put 2 and 2 together until my bike died that night. It ran pretty well off of a watery tank of gas until it got to about 1/2 tank and the mixture got to the point where it was just ridiculous.

If it isn't fuel line and/or carbs, drain some of the tank into a clear plastic bottle like a bottled water bottle and let it settle. Gas and water will separate like vinegar and oil salad dressing and you'll be able to see if there is a problem pretty easily.
 

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Gas stations won't intentionally add water to their tanks. That will cause a lot of expensive car repairs as well as EPA problems that they are liable for. Water will drop to the bottom of the storage tank and literally be pumped 100% through the pumps if it reaches deeper than 8 inches or so. Cars that fill up with this will die before they get out of the lot. A leaking storage tank can get water in it and it's a major and costly concern for station owners. Lots of precautions are put in place to avoid this because the legal ramifications are many, many times more expensive than any profit that could be made by adding water.

The reserve stem usually sticks up a couple inches into the tank. If the fuel level starts falling below that mark, such as when gas is sloshing around from turns or stops and starts, air will get sucked in instead. This usually isn't a problem with a 1/2 full tank, but much more common with one that is 1/4 full.
 

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Gas stations won't intentionally add water to their tanks. That will cause a lot of expensive car repairs as well as EPA problems that they are liable for. Water will drop to the bottom of the storage tank and literally be pumped 100% through the pumps if it reaches deeper than 8 inches or so. Cars that fill up with this will die before they get out of the lot. A leaking storage tank can get water in it and it's a major and costly concern for station owners. Lots of precautions are put in place to avoid this because the legal ramifications are many, many times more expensive than any profit that could be made by adding water.

The reserve stem usually sticks up a couple inches into the tank. If the fuel level starts falling below that mark, such as when gas is sloshing around from turns or stops and starts, air will get sucked in instead. This usually isn't a problem with a 1/2 full tank, but much more common with one that is 1/4 full.
This one did. It was all over the papers here. They tried to claim they didn't, but they ended up paying for some pretty expensive repairs. The cars were making it out of the lot and then dying, and you're right - the legal ramifications pretty much ended their business. Chevron denied everything and put it on the individuals who owned the station - I think it was a franchise, but I don't remember. Obviously run by geniuses. As I recall, even after denying that they had any responsibility, Chevron ended up quietly writing a lot of checks to make it go away.

I also can't remember what is there now. It's still a gas station, but they had to pump everything out and start from scratch. it might be a Shell now.

At any rate, my bike ran like crap, but considering it was running on watered down gas, the fact that it ran at all was pretty impressive. I told the whole story in the Yamaha forum here, in the thread about being happy with your dealer.
 

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These guys must not have been too smart. The two liquids do not mix. Any water added would just sink right to the bottom. There's really no way to "just mix a little water in" to rip off the customers at the pump. What will come out at the dispenser is all water until the added water is gone from the storage tank.

The outlet from the underground storage tanks to the dispensers is about 8-10 inches from the bottom of the tank, to keep any moisture or condensation from getting sucked through. The general practice is to check for water in the tanks daily using a special paste that will change color if exposed to water on the bottom of the tank measuring stick. Newer systems have automatic water monitoring.

(I used to work for an oil company during the 90's) :D
 

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OP - how did you fill the tank? You plugged the hose in all the way and stopped when it auto-stopped? Because if that's the case you'd get only half tank each time.
Welcome to the forum btw :)
 

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These guys must not have been too smart. The two liquids do not mix. Any water added would just sink right to the bottom. There's really no way to "just mix a little water in" to rip off the customers at the pump. What will come out at the dispenser is all water until the added water is gone from the storage tank.

The outlet from the underground storage tanks to the dispensers is about 8-10 inches from the bottom of the tank, to keep any moisture or condensation from getting sucked through. The general practice is to check for water in the tanks daily using a special paste that will change color if exposed to water on the bottom of the tank measuring stick. Newer systems have automatic water monitoring.

(I used to work for an oil company during the 90's) :D
Yeah - as I recall, their statements in the paper didn't exactly make them sound like Rhodes scholars. It was a stupid, greedy move, and I guess they paid for it, because they no longer have the gas station.

I've always used Chevron gas and never had a problem with it other than this one time. It wasn't Chevron - it was this particular gas station's owners.

At any rate, the problem the OP has sounds similar to what happened when my bike had it's problem, so I thought I'd throw it out there.
 
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