Motorcycle Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
2005 Honda Rebel
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This site requests you introduce yourself as one of your first few posts so people know you are serious and not a hit and run type poster. Introductions found here ... https://www.motorcycleforum.com/forums/new-member-introduction.305/
Hi Guys!

I'm new here, and new to riding.

I recently passed my class, so I am endorsed. I also purchased my first bike, a little Honda Rebel 250. I would eventually like to move up to a sporty, but I'm petite and waiting until im totally comfortable.

Which leads me to why I'm here. I'm comfortable (for the most part) on my bike. I cruise all over my neighborhood, and my slow turns have gotten much better. But, I'm so nervous about taking it out on the road. I feel like every time I say I'm going to take it out, I get in my head. How the heck do you get over this fear? My neighborhood is small, and I can't really get past 3rd gear... So I want to go somewhere I can get more practice in.

I feel like I'm my worst enemy in this situation. So, any tips? I think it's the fear of making a stupid mistake with other cars around.

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,607 Posts
Welcome from Granite Falls, WA.

I totally get it. I even had the same feeling when I started riding again after taking a hiatus. I had logged several thousand miles on the freeway before I quit riding, yet the thought of getting up to speed was really worrisome for some reason.

My advice would be to take baby steps. Maybe there are some roads that you can get on that aren't QUITE so busy? A good 45mph back road would be a lot of fun for you.

Another thing you might try is to just pick a destination, go there, and come home. Maybe a quick trip to the store, and take the long way home? It may be a short trip but what you are after is success. One short trip to town and back will help build confidence.

I can tell you this for sure...once you go for it and do it, you will wonder what all the fuss was about. Best wishes and be safe. Ride your own ride, always.
 

·
On The Road Again!
Joined
·
3,405 Posts
The best advice I can give you is to take that bike out EVERYDAY and ride it a bit.
Practice makes perfect. The more you ride, the better you'll get.
And suddenly one day, you'll wonder why you were afraid at all!
Welcome to the club!
(and welcome to this forum!!)
 

·
Registered
2016 BMW F800 GT
Joined
·
6 Posts
I’ve been watching youtuber “motojitsu”. He has lots of parking lot drills, and great explanations of counter steering, and just in general lots of good info. As stated it’s good to ride every day for a while. I have ridden my bike every day for about a week, and I am starting to feel comfortable with it. One day I went to a parking lot and did a full start and stop over 100 times. I have zero question where the clutch threshold is now. And a full stop with a foot down is much easier. For me- having the start and stop down made me more confident in traffic, maybe it could help you too. Good luck and keep us posted.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
2018 Kawasaki NINJA 650 ABS KRT
Joined
·
153 Posts
Welcome!

Great choice for a first bike!(y) What you're feeling is normal. Keep practicing all that good stuff you learned in your BRC. I did a lot of riding around my quiet neighborhood at first, and then gradually branched a little further out. There was a 55mph highway nearby that had virtually no traffic on it after they put in a four-lane bypass and tore out an old bridge over the river. Eventually I ventured out there and I felt like I was going 1000 mph!!:eek: Just take your time; find times when traffic is light. It takes time for all that muscle memory to become automatic so you can focus more on all the factors around you. It's no different than when you first learn to drive a car; I remember being scared of being out in traffic back then. Eventually, you'll get used to it. Ride safe!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
let me speak as what Offcenter said,
The best advice I can give you is to take that bike out EVERYDAY and ride it a bit.
Practice makes perfect.
But one thing that you have to keep in mind is to maintain and manage the following distance accordingly to your capabilities of driving skills.
 

·
Registered
2009 HD superglide FXD.
Joined
·
47 Posts
Hi Guys!

I'm new here, and new to riding.

I recently passed my class, so I am endorsed. I also purchased my first bike, a little Honda Rebel 250. I would eventually like to move up to a sporty, but I'm petite and waiting until im totally comfortable.

Which leads me to why I'm here. I'm comfortable (for the most part) on my bike. I cruise all over my neighborhood, and my slow turns have gotten much better. But, I'm so nervous about taking it out on the road. I feel like every time I say I'm going to take it out, I get in my head. How the heck do you get over this fear? My neighborhood is small, and I can't really get past 3rd gear... So I want to go somewhere I can get more practice in.

I feel like I'm my worst enemy in this situation. So, any tips? I think it's the fear of making a stupid mistake with other cars around.

Thanks!

im new to. bike is a harley davidson dynaglide, 2009. ill put some stuff that helps me get moving. you already mentioned turning. when i started riding my turns were always wide. really wide. also do u-turns until you are sick of it. what i did was ride up to the local highschool and practaced in the massive parking lot. i also had it reall good on the street because everyone was shut in from covid. just work on the turns in a place where you dont have to worry about getting hit. at some point, maybe on a hollyday or on sunday when everyone is in church or at home in the AM hit the highway and get up to speed. just go one o ramp to the next exit and see how you do. also, have decent gear. nothing wrecks a nice morning ride like a dragon fly in the mouth at 70 mph, and in my opinion as a fellow newber, it sets you back in trainning your self to be a good rider. never push it. if you feel weird riding, go home and rest. after a bit it all just comes to you, then give it all a shot in some traffic. other then that, have fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,728 Posts
Lots of good advice here and the 250 Rebel is, IMHO, an excellent bike to learn on and apply your skills as you learn them. Lots of riding and lots of practice will build your confidence every day. It will get easier with seat time. :)
 

·
Retired twice: Navy and as a govt contractor
Joined
·
13,146 Posts
Like UK says "practice, practice, practice. Rinse and repeat. Ride everyday and as time goes on so will you
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
I learned during COVID and went out early.. 5 am..and had the streets to myself more or less. That helped. Now I have 8k miles under my belt. Doesn't make me an expert at all but I can relate to those early feelings of uncertainty. I rode almost every day as others have said and I practiced at least every other day, bought cones etc. At first I remember I'd look in my mirror and I'd see cars behind me. It felt like they were unfriendly and chasing me. Ha, my mindset at the time. They felt like predators to me!

It gets easier. Get up early and go! Also, slow speeds are often around tricky surfaces. Like I'd pull into a gas station and the pavement at the entrance was angled. Tricky. Look for those situations which can make you drop your bike. I was about to do a U turn the other day and noticed some of the pavement was chewed up so I did it a few feet later. If you try to avoid predicaments as much as possible you'll ease into it. Good luck!
 

·
On The Road Again!
Joined
·
3,405 Posts
SteveShadow has a good point. Go out EARLY!
My favorite time to ride has always been 5 or 6 am on a Sunday morning.
Everyone is still in bed. You'll have the roads all to yourself.
The sun is just coming up and the air is fresh.
You can ride for HOURS on a Sunday morning, go anywhere you want, and
hardly see a car.
Try it! You'll like it!
 

·
Registered
2009 HD superglide FXD.
Joined
·
47 Posts
I learned during COVID and went out early.. 5 am..and had the streets to myself more or less. That helped. Now I have 8k miles under my belt. Doesn't make me an expert at all but I can relate to those early feelings of uncertainty. I rode almost every day as others have said and I practiced at least every other day, bought cones etc. At first I remember I'd look in my mirror and I'd see cars behind me. It felt like they were unfriendly and chasing me. Ha, my mindset at the time. They felt like predators to me!

It gets easier. Get up early and go! Also, slow speeds are often around tricky surfaces. Like I'd pull into a gas station and the pavement at the entrance was angled. Tricky. Look for those situations which can make you drop your bike. I was about to do a U turn the other day and noticed some of the pavement was chewed up so I did it a few feet later. If you try to avoid predicaments as much as possible you'll ease into it. Good luck!

thats pretty much how i did it. when i felt the way you mentioned feeling, it was break time. full disclosure, i layed my bike down twice. first time was because i panicked in a turn going to slow, second time was becaused i used to much front break at a stop signe.
SteveShadow has a good point. Go out EARLY!
My favorite time to ride has always been 5 or 6 am on a Sunday morning.
Everyone is still in bed. You'll have the roads all to yourself.
The sun is just coming up and the air is fresh.
You can ride for HOURS on a Sunday morning, go anywhere you want, and
hardly see a car.
Try it! You'll like it!

me to. from where i live i can ride all the way to Galveston with only a few cars here and there in I-45 south. and during the beginning of covid, one would be hard pressed to see any cars other then police and DPS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
367 Posts
Practice. Start with one technique at a time and focus on practicing that one thing for a while- don't try and fix or work on too many things at once. Listening to the voice in your head and knowing when to ride, when to try something new, when to call it quits for the day. Also, you might want to look into some form of advanced rider training. I'm a riding coach with the California Superbike School and I truly believe that training courses and constantly working on improving your own riding can literally save your life :) Let me know if you have any specific questions about certain riding techniques or riding skills. Good luck and safe riding!
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top